Flora Ward

b. circa 1874
FatherArthur Ward
MotherJane Wickens b. 1851
     Flora Ward was born circa 1874 at Hastings, Sussex, England.1 She was the daughter of Arthur Ward and Jane Wickens.

Citations

  1. [S70] 1881 Census for England, "RG11 piece 1065 folio 19 page 17."

Florence Amelia Ward

b. 9 January 1869, d. 14 May 1909
FatherThomas Ward b. 6 Apr 1831, d. 25 Dec 1881
MotherJane Little b. 26 Aug 1831, d. 21 Nov 1893
     Florence Amelia Ward was born on 9 January 1869 at High St, St Kilda, Victoria, Australia. She was the daughter of Thomas Ward and Jane Little.
Florence is said to have come from a Quaker family. She was good at sewing and crafts. She did tatting, bobbin lace, drawn threadwork, tapestry and richelieu work amongst other things. She played the piano and there exists sheet music with her name on them. Julitha has her Victorian jewellery box and several items of jewellery. She was well educated. A book, Alfred Lord Tennyson's complete works, is inscribed with her name and dated 1896. It contains the course outline for a Melbourne University Extension School programme on Tennyson which she must have attended.
In 1901 Florence Amelia Ward lived at 609 Murray Street, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
Florence Amelia Ward married George McKay, son of Duncan McKay and Ann Hall, on 5 February 1901 at The Presbyterian Church, Havelock St, West Perth, Western Australia, Australia. Witnesses: Norman Sinclair Ward and Clara L Ward.1
Both of Florence Ward's parents were deceased when she was married.
It is not known how George and Florence came to be in Western Australia given that their origins were in Victoria. The gold boom may have brought George to Western Australia in banking. George McKay and the WARD family were at Coolgardie and Kalgoorlie and the goldfields at the turn of the century.
George and Florence were foundation members of the Christian Science Church in Western Australia. The first Sunday service was held on 9.2.1908 in a small dressmaker's room in Hay St. Rose OCKLEY (who George married after Florence died) was also in this group. George become a second reader, first reader and finally a trustee of the Church. He bid for, and bought the block of land in St George's Place (near the Barrack's Arch) where the Church was built in 1939.
Florence Amelia Ward died on 14 May 1909 at Perth, Western Australia, Australia, at age 40.2,3
Florence died of TB although the family was told it was the flu because of the stigma associated with TB (consumption). Daughter Valmai died one month later and was buried in the same grave as her mother.
George McKay purchased burial plots BA 69,70 for himself and Florence. The cost was 3 pounds 3 shillings. He was living at 39 Outrim St, Perth at the time.
The following death notice appeared in the Western Mail on the 22 May 1909:
McKay - On the 14th inst., at 39 Outram-street, Florence Amelia, dearly beloved wife of Geo.McKay, and sister of N. S. Ward, Park-road, Mount Lawley.4
Florence Amelia Ward was buried after 22 May 1909 at Grave BA 70 (Presbyterian), Karrakatta Cemetery, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.3

Family

George McKay b. 16 Sep 1872, d. 28 Sep 1953
Marriage*
Florence Amelia Ward married George McKay, son of Duncan McKay and Ann Hall, on 5 February 1901 at The Presbyterian Church, Havelock St, West Perth, Western Australia, Australia. Witnesses: Norman Sinclair Ward and Clara L Ward.1 
Children

Citations

  1. [S301] Index to Births, Deaths & Marriages, http://www.bdm.dotag.wa.gov.au, 1841-1971, compiled by Deaths & Marriages, WA Registry of Births, Level 10, 141 St Georges Terrace, Perth WA 6000 "Registration No 1116 in Year 1901."
  2. [S301] Index to Births, Deaths & Marriages, http://www.bdm.dotag.wa.gov.au, 1841-1971, compiled by Deaths & Marriages, WA Registry of Births, Level 10, 141 St Georges Terrace, Perth WA 6000 "Registration No 296 in Year 1909."
  3. [S418] Website "Metropolitan Cemeteries Board, WA" (http://www.mcb.wa.gov.au/).
  4. [S327] Webpage Western Mail (http://trove.nla.gov.au/) "1909 'Family Notices.', Western Mail (Perth, WA : 1885 - 1954), 22 May, p. 31, viewed 14 March, 2013, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37579526."

Florence Mabel Ward

b. circa 1874
FatherEdwin Ward b. c 1840
MotherMargaret Richards b. c 1851
     Florence Mabel Ward was born circa 1874 at Calcutta, India.1,2 She was the daughter of Edwin Ward and Margaret Richards.
On 5 April 1891 Florence Mabel Ward lived at 2 Braemar Vill, Tottenham, Middlesex, England, with her mother Margaret and brother Alfred.2
On 29 April 1899 Florence Mabel Ward and Frank Muller lived at 346 City Rd, Islington, Middlesex, England.
Florence Mabel Ward married Frank Muller, son of Henry Arthur Muller, on 29 April 1899 at Islington, Middlesex, England, witnesses Percy Couch and Mary Ann Luck. Fathers Edwin Ward, engineer, and Frank Muller, stationer.3
On 31 March 1901 Florence Mabel Ward and Frank Muller lived at 68 Fernhead Rd, Paddington, London, England.1
On 2 April 1911 Florence Mabel Ward and Frank Muller lived at 20A Lynn Street, Balham, Wandsworth, London, England.4
In 1930 Florence Mabel Ward and Frank Muller lived at 8 Northcote St, Rose Bay, New South Wales, Australia.5

Family

Frank Muller b. c 1877
Marriage*
Florence Mabel Ward married Frank Muller, son of Henry Arthur Muller, on 29 April 1899 at Islington, Middlesex, England, witnesses Percy Couch and Mary Ann Luck. Fathers Edwin Ward, engineer, and Frank Muller, stationer.3 
Child

Citations

  1. [S72] 1901 Census for England "RG13 piece 5 folio 78 page 14."
  2. [S71] 1891 Census for England "The National Archives of the UK (TNA); Kew, Surrey, England; Census Returns of England and Wales, 1891; Class: RG12; Piece: 1075; Folio: 38; Page: 6; GSU roll: 6096185."
  3. [S324] Marriage certificate of Florence Mabel Ward and Frank Muller, married 29 Apr 1899 in the Registration District of Islington, Middlexex, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 1b Page 510).
  4. [S73] 1911 Census for England "Class: RG14; Piece: 2305."
  5. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "Source Information:
    Ancestry.com. Australian Electoral Rolls, 1903-1980 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010.
    Original data: Australian Electoral Commission. [Electoral roll]"

Frances Margaret Ward

b. circa 1863, d. 7 September 1934
FatherEdwin Ward b. c 1840
MotherMary (?) b. 1841, d. 22 Sep 1867
Frances Margaret Brown (nee Ward) c1918
     Frances Margaret Ward was born circa 1863 at India; death certificate has place of birth as Raja Mahore, India. The birth certificate of her son Hugh Toronto has something different. She was the daughter of Edwin Ward and Mary (?)
A baptism record for Frances has not been found. Her year and place of birth come from her death certificate. At the time of her marriage on 22 Dec 1879 she was residing in Assensole, India and her age was 17 years. Only her father Edwin (no occupation given) and her sister Catherine are named on the marriage certificate.
On Hugh Toronto (Philip) Brown's birth certificate, Frances Margaret Brown (the mother) has her place of birth recorded as Raja....(?), India. Could it be Rajarbagan near Howrah? All this needs further investigation.
In 1879 Frances Margaret Ward and Hugh Brown lived at Asansole, India.
Frances Margaret Ward married Hugh Brown, son of John Hone Brown and Margaret McMillan, on 22 December 1879 at St John's Church, Calcutta, India, witnesses were E Ward, Catherine Ward and E Hindhaugh.1
The family moved from NSW to Western Australia c1900.2
Frances Margaret Ward was a witness: Hugh Philip Brown's wife Eva reported that c1913 (when child Hugh was a baby) that there were family meetings concerning the Ward family. Hugh Philip Brown would go off to see his family and tell her "it was none of her business". This was possibly concerning Hugh's mother's sister, Jane Mary Skelton (nee Ward) whose husband mysteriously left her on 2 September 1914 and disappeared. He withdrew all his money from their bank accounts but mailed her a bank book with 150 pounds deposited for her. She received no further communication from him and the courts finally pronounced him dead in 1927. The family meetings may have been about helping Jane, either financially or in some other way. Interestingly, Jane died in Toronto, NSW in 1947 which was Hugh Philip Brown's birthplace in 1891.
In July 1914 Frances Margaret Ward lived at Kenny St, West Guildford, Western Australia, Australia.3
Frances was referred to as "Nurse Brown" in the funeral notice for her daughter Florence Mabel Brown:
VAUGHAN.-Tho Friends of Nurse Brown, of Kenny-street, West Guildford, are respect fully invited to follow the remains of her late daughter, Florence Mabel, to the place of interment, the Anglican Cemetery, Karrakatta. The Funeral is appointed to leave Messrs. Bowra and O'Dea's Private Mortuary, 195 Pier-street. Perth, at 9.45 o'clock TO-MORROW (Wednesday) MORNING. per road. Friends wishing to attend the Funeral may proceed by the 10.30 train leaving Perth. BOWRA and O'DEA, Undertakers, 195
Pier-street, Perth. Tel. 308.3

Hugh and Frances Brown never divorced but did not live together. Frances lived in the house in Mt Lawley and Hugh lived on a boat on the river. He used to caretake boats for a shipping company (torpedo boats, fair sized, wooden, moored near the Raffles Hotel). Frances parents had not sanctioned the marriage and she would have left after a couple of years but had a child and no options. Hugh was also considered to be a bit of a drinker. His behaviour, combined with that of his son Leonard Percival, was why his other son Hugh Philip Brown was a fervent teetotaller.
Frances Margaret Ward died on 7 September 1934 at 109 Third Avenue, Mt Lawley, Western Australia, Australia. She died of senility and myocardial degeneration cardiac failure. Age given as 70 years.2
Frances Margaret Ward was buried on 7 September 1934 at Anglican section, Karrakatta cemetery, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.2
Death notices that appeared in the newspaper for Frances Margaret Brown can be seen by clicking here.
Frances Brown's death certificate states that she lived in NSW for 20 years and Western Australia 34 years.

Family

Hugh Brown b. 11 Jan 1857, d. 15 Jul 1931
Marriage*
Frances Margaret Ward married Hugh Brown, son of John Hone Brown and Margaret McMillan, on 22 December 1879 at St John's Church, Calcutta, India, witnesses were E Ward, Catherine Ward and E Hindhaugh.1 
Children

Citations

  1. [S296] Marriage certificate of Hugh Brown and Frances Margaret Ward, married 22 Dec 1879 in the Registration District of Calcutta, India (Ref no: Vol N/1/170 Folio 158 No 4222).
  2. [S294] Death certificate of Frances Margaret Brown, died 7 Sep 1934, registered 14 Sep 1934 in the Registration District of Perth, Western Australia (Reference no: 1555/34).
  3. [S305] Webpage The West Australian (http://trove.nla.gov.au/) "1914 'Family Notices.', The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954), 14 July, p. 1, viewed 20 July, 2012, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article26910750."

Harrison Ward

b. 8 January 1840, d. 13 July 1923
FatherThomas Ward b. c 1797
MotherElizabeth Harrison b. c 1799
     Harrison Ward was born on 8 January 1840 at Attercliffe, Sheffield, Yorkshire, England.1 He was the son of Thomas Ward and Elizabeth Harrison.
Harrison Ward was baptized on 21 June 1840 at St Mary's, Handsworth, Yorkshire, England.2
On 30 March 1851 Harrison Ward lived at Low Green School, Rawdon, Otley, Yorkshire, England, a pupil at the school.3
The information about Harrison Ward going to Australia and marrying Mary Maria Perigo has been collected from family trees contributed to Ancestry.co.uk and has not been verified. It needs to be treated with some suspicion until it has been checked.
The New South Wales Police Gazette dated 1 Feb 1865 mentions the recovery of "a portmanteau, containing wearing apparel, etc (portmanteau and portion of contents recovered), the property of Harrison Ward". The theft was reported in the Police Gazette on 11 Jan 1865. Was this the year he arrived in Australia?4,5
Harrison Ward married Mary Maria Perigo on 14 July 1870 at St George, New South Wales, Australia.6
They had eight children.
On 4 November 1914 Harrison Ward lived at Blaxlands Ridge, New South Wales, Australia.7
Harrison Ward died on 13 July 1923 at Blaxlands Ridge Post Office, Blaxlands Ridge, New South Wales, Australia, at age 83. Age 84 years.8

Family

Mary Maria Perigo b. 28 Sep 1848, d. 28 Oct 1920
Marriage*
Harrison Ward married Mary Maria Perigo on 14 July 1870 at St George, New South Wales, Australia.6 

Citations

  1. [S419] Birth certificate of Harrison Ward, born 8 Jan 1840, registered 21 Jan 1840 in the Registration District of Sheffield, Yorkshire, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 22 Page 551).
  2. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) "GS Film number: 990889."
  3. [S16] 1851 Census for England "HO107 piece 1333 folio 2/28 page 20."
  4. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "State Records Authority of New South Wales; Police Gazettes 1862-1930; Roll: 3130; Year: 1865; Page: 41."
  5. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "State Records Authority of New South Wales; Police Gazettes 1862-1930; Roll: 3130; Year: 1865; Page: 15."
  6. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "Australia Marriage Index, 1788-1950 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. (Marriage Reg. No. 1444)."
  7. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "State Records Authority of New South Wales; Police Gazettes 1862-1930; Roll: 3598; Year: 1914; Page: 531."
  8. [S298] Webpage The Sydney Morning Herald (http://trove.nla.gov.au/) "1923 'Family Notices.', The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), 14 July, p. 12, viewed 24 April, 2013, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article16080611."

Jane Ward

b. 26 November 1820
FatherThomas Ward b. c 1797
MotherElizabeth Harrison b. c 1799
     Jane Ward was baptized on 26 November 1820 at St Mary's, Handsworth, Yorkshire, England, from Bishop's Transcripts for Handsworth, 1598-1874. Church of Engalnd. Parish Church of Handsworth, Yorkshire.1 She was the daughter of Thomas Ward and Elizabeth Harrison.

Citations

  1. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) "GS Film number: 990889."

Jane Ward

b. 17 January 1725/26, d. 1804
FatherJoseph Ward b. 9 Jan 1686, d. 1746
MotherJane (?) d. 1735
     Jane Ward was born on 17 January 1725/26 at Mollington, Oxfordshire, England; "Labourer."1 She was the daughter of Joseph Ward and Jane (?)
Jane Ward was baptized on 23 January 1725/26 at Mollington, Oxfordshire, England, ""Jane ye daughter of Joseph Ward (Labourer) by Jane his wife was born on 17th day of Janry 1725/6 and was baptised on ye 23rd day of ye same month."1
Jane Ward married William Lines, son of Benjamin Lines and Grace Hall, on 14 June 1747 at Eydon, Oxfordshire, England, both of Chipping Warden, by banns.2
Jane Ward died in 1804 at Chipping Warden, Northamptonshire, England.
Jane Ward was buried on 30 March 1804 at Chipping Warden, Northamptonshire, England, "Jane LINNES wife of William LINNES the Elder."2

Family

William Lines b. 6 Nov 1726, d. 1807
Marriage*
Jane Ward married William Lines, son of Benjamin Lines and Grace Hall, on 14 June 1747 at Eydon, Oxfordshire, England, both of Chipping Warden, by banns.2 
Children

Citations

  1. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "Ancestry.com. England & Wales, Christening Index, 1530-1980 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2008."
  2. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "Northamptonshire Record Office; Northampton, England; Register Type: Bishops Transcripts."

Jane Mary Ward

b. circa 1866, d. 26 February 1947
FatherEdwin Ward b. c 1840
MotherMary (?) b. 1841, d. 22 Sep 1867
     Jane Mary Ward was born circa 1866 at India. She was the daughter of Edwin Ward and Mary (?)
Jane's death certificate confirms that her father was Edwin Ward, Engineer. It states she was born in India and had spent 55 years in NSW.
She died in 1947 at age 87 years which would put her birth c1860. However, the death certificate also says that she married at age 16 years, which would put her birth c1866 if her marriage was in 1882. Her sister Frances married in 1879 at age 17 years, so Jane Mary is likely to be born after Frances.1
Jane Mary Ward married Philip Henry Skelton on 31 January 1882 at Calcutta, West Bengal, India, from probate of Will of P H Skelton in the NSW Court 1927. In the IGI individual record it has the marriage as 1881 Assensole India.
Jane Mary Ward witnessed the will of Philip Henry Skelton dated 3 October 1886 at Asansol, West Bengal, India.
On 30 October 1887 Jane Mary Ward and Philip Henry Skelton lived at 16 Newman St, Marylebone, Middlesex, England.
Jane Mary Ward and Philip Henry Skelton emigrated in 1892 to Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, arriving 18 Apr 1892 on the Nevasa with three children and one infant.
In 1903 Jane Mary Ward and Philip Henry Skelton lived at Hall St, Merrewether, New South Wales, Australia, (1903 Electoral Roll.)
In 1909 Jane Mary Ward and Philip Henry Skelton lived at Port Maitland Inn, Plaistowe St, Maitland West, New South Wales, Australia, (1903 Electoral Roll).
The 2nd September 1914 was the last day that Jane Mary Skelton saw her husband, Philip Henry Skelton, as he mysteriously left her and disappeared. He withdrew all his money from the bank but mailed her a bank book with 150 pounds deposited for her. She received no further communication from him and the courts finally pronounced him dead in 1927. According to Barry Brown, a descendant of Jane, the story from his family was that Philip Henry Skelton ran off with a barmaid as he used to manage a few hotels, the last one being in Richmond NSW.
Hugh Philip Brown's wife Eva reported that c1913 (when child Hugh was a baby) that there were family meetings concerning the Ward family. Hugh Philip Brown would go off to see his family and tell her "it was none of her business". This was possibly concerning Jane Mary Skelton (nee Ward) who was Hugh's mother's sister. The family meetings may have been about helping Jane, either financially or in some other way. Interestingly, Jane died in Toronto, NSW in 1947 which was Hugh Philip Brown's birthplace in 1891.
Jane Mary Ward was a witness: On 6 September 1927 the probate court granted leave to swear to the death of Philip Henry Skelton as having taken place on or since September 3, 1914.2
In 1937 Jane Mary Ward lived at Margaret Street, O'Brien's Estate, Cessnock, New South Wales, Australia.
Jane Mary Ward died on 26 February 1947 at Coal Point Rd, Coal Point, Toronto, New South Wales, Australia. Jane Mary Skelton death cert shows the informant as a A Gracie, grandson, of Coal Point Rd, Coal Point, Toronto NSW she was 81 when she passed away born in about 1866 in India she married Philip Henry Skelton at 16 years of age in about 1882 in India at the time of her death Jane Mary Skelton had been in NSW for about 55 years the same amount of time as her son Alfred Edwin John Skelton. Jane Mary was buried on the 28 February 1947 at the Church of England Cemetary Toronto NSW.1
Jane Mary Ward was buried on 28 February 1947 at Church of England Cemetery, Toronto, New South Wales, Australia.1

Family

Philip Henry Skelton b. 24 Jun 1858, d. a 3 Sep 1914
Marriage*
Jane Mary Ward married Philip Henry Skelton on 31 January 1882 at Calcutta, West Bengal, India, from probate of Will of P H Skelton in the NSW Court 1927. In the IGI individual record it has the marriage as 1881 Assensole India. 
Children

Citations

  1. [S315] Death certificate of Jane Mary Skelton, died 26 Feb 1947, registered 28 Feb 1947 in the Registration District of NSW (Reference no: 1947/002325).
  2. [S298] Webpage The Sydney Morning Herald (http://trove.nla.gov.au/) "1927 'IN PROBATE.', The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), 6 September, p. 8, viewed 23 July, 2012, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article16401840."

John Ward

Family

Child

Joseph Ward

b. 9 January 1686, d. 1746
FatherJoseph Ward
MotherAnne (?)
     Joseph Ward was baptized on 9 January 1686 at Mollington, Oxfordshire, England, "Labourer."1 He was the son of Joseph Ward and Anne (?)
Joseph Ward married Jane (?) circa 1720 at Oxfordshire, England.
Joseph Ward married Kathleen Howes on 25 October 1736 at Mollington, Oxfordshire, England.2
Joseph Ward died in 1746 at Mollington, Oxfordshire, England.

Family 1

Jane (?) d. 1735
Marriage*
Joseph Ward married Jane (?) circa 1720 at Oxfordshire, England
Child

Family 2

Kathleen Howes
Marriage*
Joseph Ward married Kathleen Howes on 25 October 1736 at Mollington, Oxfordshire, England.2 

Citations

  1. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "Ancestry.com. England & Wales, Christening Index, 1530-1980 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2008."
  2. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "Oxfordshire Family History Society; Oxford, Oxfordshire, England; Anglican Parish Registers; Reference Number: PAR176/1/R1/3."

Joseph Ward

     Joseph Ward married Anne (?) circa 1685 at Oxfordshire, England.

Family

Anne (?)
Marriage*
Joseph Ward married Anne (?) circa 1685 at Oxfordshire, England
Child

Loloma Amy Ward

b. 1906
FatherNorman Sinclair Ward b. c 1866, d. 1 Jan 1916
MotherAnnie Eliza Buchanan b. c 1867, d. 29 Nov 1942
     Loloma Amy Ward was born in 1906 at Perth, Western Australia, Australia. She was the daughter of Norman Sinclair Ward and Annie Eliza Buchanan.

Lorna Winifred Ward

b. 1901
FatherNorman Sinclair Ward b. c 1866, d. 1 Jan 1916
MotherAnnie Eliza Buchanan b. c 1867, d. 29 Nov 1942
     Lorna Winifred Ward was born in 1901 at Perth, Western Australia, Australia.1 She was the daughter of Norman Sinclair Ward and Annie Eliza Buchanan.
In 1925 Lorna Winifred Ward lived at Claremont, Western Australia, Australia.2
Lorna Winifred Ward married William H L Walker in 1925 at Perth, Western Australia, Australia.3

Family

William H L Walker
Marriage*
Lorna Winifred Ward married William H L Walker in 1925 at Perth, Western Australia, Australia.3 

Citations

  1. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "Australia Birth Index, 1788-1922 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. (Registration No 4371 in Year 1901)."
  2. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "Australia, Electoral Rolls, 1903-1980 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010."
  3. [S301] Index to Births, Deaths & Marriages, http://www.bdm.dotag.wa.gov.au, 1841-1971, compiled by Deaths & Marriages, WA Registry of Births, Level 10, 141 St Georges Terrace, Perth WA 6000 "Perth, Registration No 948 in Year 1925."

Mary Ward

     Mary Ward married Edward Holton, son of John Holton and Alice (?), circa 1670 at England.

Family

Edward Holton b. 1642, d. 1676
Marriage*
Mary Ward married Edward Holton, son of John Holton and Alice (?), circa 1670 at England
Child

Mary Ward

     Mary Ward married James Breach, son of William Breach and Elizabeth Chatfield, on 21 June 1836 at St Mary in the Castle, Hastings, Sussex, England, James a widower.1

Family

James Breach b. 14 Apr 1799, d. 1858
Marriage*
Mary Ward married James Breach, son of William Breach and Elizabeth Chatfield, on 21 June 1836 at St Mary in the Castle, Hastings, Sussex, England, James a widower.1 

Citations

  1. [S24] Index to Sussex Marriages, 1538-1837, Compact Disc SFHGCD003, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, 2008.

Noel Sinclair Ward

b. 1907, d. 16 February 1986
FatherNorman Sinclair Ward b. c 1866, d. 1 Jan 1916
MotherAnnie Eliza Buchanan b. c 1867, d. 29 Nov 1942
     Noel Sinclair Ward was born in 1907 at Perth, Western Australia, Australia.1 He was the son of Norman Sinclair Ward and Annie Eliza Buchanan.
In 1931 Noel Sinclair Ward lived at Claremont, Western Australia, Australia.2
Noel Sinclair Ward married Dorothy Gladys Warwick in 1941 at Perth, Western Australia, Australia.3
In 1972 Noel Sinclair Ward lived at Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia.3
Noel Sinclair Ward died on 16 February 1986 at Daglish, Western Australia, Australia. Age 78 years.4
His body was cremated after 16 February 1986 at Karrakatta Cemetery, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.4

Family

Dorothy Gladys Warwick b. 1910, d. 17 Oct 2004
Marriage*
Noel Sinclair Ward married Dorothy Gladys Warwick in 1941 at Perth, Western Australia, Australia.3 

Citations

  1. [S301] Index to Births, Deaths & Marriages, http://www.bdm.dotag.wa.gov.au, 1841-1971, compiled by Deaths & Marriages, WA Registry of Births, Level 10, 141 St Georges Terrace, Perth WA 6000 "Perth, Registration No 1597 in Year 1907."
  2. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "Australia, Electoral Rolls, 1903-1980 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010."
  3. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "Australia Marriage Index, 1788-1950 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010."
  4. [S418] Website "Metropolitan Cemeteries Board, WA" (http://www.mcb.wa.gov.au/).

Norman Sinclair Ward

b. circa 1866, d. 1 January 1916
FatherThomas Ward b. 6 Apr 1831, d. 25 Dec 1881
MotherJane Little b. 26 Aug 1831, d. 21 Nov 1893
     Norman Sinclair Ward was born circa 1866 at St Kilda, Victoria, Australia.1 He was the son of Thomas Ward and Jane Little.
Norman Sinclair Ward married Annie Eliza Buchanan on 16 April 1900 at Perth, Western Australia, Australia.2,3
The following Marriage Notice appeared in The West Australian newspaper on 10 May 1900:
WARD-BUCHANAN. - On April 16th, at St. Mary's Church of England, Colin-street, Perth, by the Rev. T. E. Peters, NORMAN SINCLAIR, second son of the late Thomas Ward, of Taviuni, Fiji, to ANNIE ELIZA, younger daughter of Mrs. E. Buchanan, of East Melbourne.
In 1903 Norman Sinclair Ward and Annie Eliza Buchanan lived at West Perth, Western Australia, Australia.4
Norman Sinclair Ward was a clerk with the WA Bank. circa 1910.
In 1910 Norman Sinclair Ward and Annie Eliza Buchanan lived at North Perth, Western Australia, Australia.4
Norman Sinclair Ward and family lived in Alvan St, Mt Lawley, as did George and Florence McKay (nee Ward, sister to Norman). He married Annie Elisa ...? Contact was lost when the family returned to Melbourne where Norman died on 1st January, 1916. He is believed to be buried at Kew (Bundoorah) Cemetery, Victoria with Jane (mother) and Albert Ernest (brother). Norman worked as a clerk with the W.A. Bank. Children to Norman and Annie were: Noel Sinclair, Dudley Sinclair, Lorn and Alona.
Norman Sinclair Ward died on 1 January 1916 at Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Age 49 years.5

Family

Annie Eliza Buchanan b. c 1867, d. 29 Nov 1942
Marriage*
Norman Sinclair Ward married Annie Eliza Buchanan on 16 April 1900 at Perth, Western Australia, Australia.2,3 
Children

Citations

  1. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "Australia Birth Index, 1788-1922 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. (Registration No 24313 in Year 1866)."
  2. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "Australia Marriage Index, 1788-1950 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. (Registration No 1193 in Year 1900)."
  3. [S305] Webpage The West Australian (http://trove.nla.gov.au/) "1900 'Family Notices.', The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954), 10 May, p. 4, viewed 20 March, 2013, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23835092."
  4. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "Australia, Electoral Rolls, 1903-1980 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010."
  5. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "Australia Death Index, 1787-1985 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. (Registration No 2561 in Year 1916)."

Sarah Ward

b. 15 April 1827
FatherThomas Ward b. c 1797
MotherElizabeth Harrison b. c 1799
     Sarah Ward was baptized on 15 April 1827 at St Mary's, Handsworth, Yorkshire, England.1 She was the daughter of Thomas Ward and Elizabeth Harrison.

Citations

  1. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) "GS Film number: 990889."

Thomas Ward

b. 6 April 1831, d. 25 December 1881
FatherThomas Ward b. c 1797
MotherElizabeth Harrison b. c 1799
     Thomas Ward was born on 6 April 1831 at Handsworth, Yorkshire, England. He was the son of Thomas Ward and Elizabeth Harrison.
Thomas Ward was baptized on 3 July 1831 at St Mary's, Handsworth, Yorkshire, England.1
On 7 June 1841 Thomas Ward lived at Canal Side, Attercliffe, Sheffield, Yorkshire, England, with his parents and family.2
Thomas Ward was a linen draper's apprentice to John Whiting. He was one of 8 apprentices living with John and Emma Whiting. on 30 March 1851.3
On 30 March 1851 Thomas Ward lived at 5 Leeds Bridge, Leeds, Yorkshire, England.3
Thomas Ward married Jane Little, daughter of William Little and Mary (?), on 9 June 1862 at All Hallows London Wall, London, England.4
Thomas Ward was a linen draper according to his marriage certificate in 1862.4
Thomas Ward and Jane Little emigrated circa 1862 to Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. The actual date of arrival has not been found. They were in London for their marriage in 1862 and then appear in Australia in 1864 for the birth of their son Albert Ernest in St Kilda, Victoria.
The death certificate of Jane Ward lists Clifford Blakey (deceased) as her first born, but no further reference has been found of him. He does not appear on the birth certificate of Florence Amelia. He possibly died at an early age, maybe on the voyage to Australia. The shipping records have been searched but nothing found. The family were quite well off and probably paid their own fare, rather than being assisted passengers (for whom much more information is available). Also, other Little's may have come out to Australia as George McKay is said to have referred to Ward and Little relatives in Melbourne.
An article on Taviuni was published in The Argus (Melbourne) on 19 October 1870, and an excerpt is given below:
The plantations of Vuna Point, the principal settlement on the island, are thickly clustered together. The community thus formed, and the immunity from native interference enjoyed through the presence of Tui Thakau, the most powerful chief in the group after Maafu and Thakombau, have made this a favourite district for settlers with families. There are over 100 planters on the island, and 13 white ladies. The land is very rich, the surface being composed almost entirely of scoriae and fine disintegrated rock. It requires very little cultivation, and none but the most primitive agricultural implements are in use. Fijian labour can also be used here, and a magistrate from Mbau lives on the island for the purpose of keeping them in order. They can be fed very cheaply, for the tivoli, or wild yam, grows in the woods, and one man out of every ten is sufficient to procure the necessary daily supply. As a set-off to these advantages, however, the land is very heavily timbered ; a huge spine of mountains, on the top of which there is said to be a fine lake, attracts an undue share of rain, to the occasional injury of the cotton, and the running streams are for the most part subterranean. Vuna Point has had direct shipments from and to Sydney for the last year. A substantial jetty has been erected by Messrs. Wilson, Hamilton, and Co., and there is also an hotel on the Point.5
Thomas Ward and Jane Little emigrated circa 1871 to Taveuni, Fiji. They had a copra plantation there. His occupation on daughter Florence Amelia Ward's marriage certificate is given as planter.
A hurricane struck Taviuni on the 19th and 20th March devestating the cotton crop on nearly all plantations.6
The census of Europeans resident in Taveuni was completed on 28 June 1875 and listed the Ward homestead in Qara Walu, Vuna, Taveuni under the name "Newell and Ward" suggesting that Thomas may have had a business partner living with them on the plantation. A separate list of individuals was completed 20 May 1875 and includes Thomas and Jane Ward, the children Albert, Norman, Florence and Clara, as well as James Newell. There is a James Edward Newell (1852-1910) of the London Missionary Society who became well known for his work in Samoa - maybe there is a connection (although this James Edward Newell, born in Bradford, Yorkshire and trained at the Lancashire Congregatinal College, reportedly left England in 1880, after the census date).
There is only one other family listed in Qara Walu in 1875 and that is the Cazaly family, whose head is Edward Cazaly. Qara Walu is near the southern tip of Taveuni Island, near Vuna Point. After returning to Melbourne c1888, the family named their house "Vuna".7
The 1889 will of Elizabeth Little, sister to Jane, also confirms their late place of residence in Fiji as Qara Walu. Jan Conroy, a descendant of Norman Sinclair Ward, writes:
"The name of the family plantation was “Naqarawalu”. The property now has a road called the Waimarere-Salialevue Road going through it and is in the Vuna district toward the south of the Island. There now appears to be a town called Naqarawalu and if you use Google Earth you can find it. Also from copies of the lease of the property after the death of my Grandfather in Melbourne, it is evident that it was a copra plantation."
Thomas Ward died on 25 December 1881 at Taveuni, Fiji, at age 50. He died of dysentry which he had suffered for ten days. His death certificate gives his occupation as draper and his wife Jane's residence as Tarim(?). His daughter Florence's birth certificate (1869) also gives his occupation as draper. Note that his death certificate gives date of death as 26 December, same day as his burial. However, his death notice in the newspaper gives the 25th which is more likely correct (given also that his death certificate is a modern transcription and not the original record and does appear to contain other mistakes).8
Thomas Ward was buried on 26 December 1881 at Taveuni, Fiji.8
The following death notice appeared in The Australasian Sketcher with Pen and Pencil (Melbourne, Vic.: 1873-1889):
WARD. —On the 25th ult., at Vuna-point, Taviuni, Fiji, Thomas Ward, in his 50th year.
It also appeared in The Argus (Melbourne) on 18 January 1882.9,10
After Thomas died in 1881, Jane and the children remained in Taveuni for about another six years. Her two sons Albert and Norman would have been nearly 18 and 16 years respectively, so they were probably able to manage in their father's absence given there was plenty of cheap labour available.
Daryl Tarte of Suva, Fiji is a descendant of the Tarte family who were the major landholders of the southern portion of Taveuni. Daryl writes: "The area known as Qarawalu is quite large and has now been subdivided. There would be no chance of the Ward home surviving, nor any graves being found. All this land was owned by my family and I would imagine that the witness (on Thomas' death certificate) would have been my great grandfather – J.V. Tarte" (incorrectly transcribed as J.L. Tartes on the typed copy of the certificate).
Thomas and Jane's daughter Florence Amelia Ward wrote an article called "Plantation Life in Fiji" sometime after she married George McKAY in 1901. Her address was Colin St, Perth, Western Australia. It is transcribed below:

"Plantation Life in Fiji" by F.A.McK.
Plantation life in Fiji is rather different to plantation life in other countries; Ceylon or India for instance; & yet in many respects it is very similar. A planters life in the South Pacific is free and easy, healthy & interesting. A picturesque spot with a good commanding view is always chosen in which to erect the homestead; often built bungalow fashion (the modern buildings of now-a-days are more like our cottages) in an enclosure of an acre or more ground. The fence around the homestead is generally one of "Moli" (lime or lemon trees). These trees are planted very closely together & are clipped
page 2
every year to keep them short & bushy. They are not allowed to grow more than four feet in height. This fence which is exceedingly pretty, being of a bright rich green, is also a very secure safeguard for the garden and the nearer surroundings of the homestead; as cattle, pigs, etc cannot force their way through on account of the thorns. In front of this "vali" (house) is a beautiful & most luxuriously grown garden full of sweet smelling flowers, croatous, vines & creepers of all discriptions intertwining amongst the shrubs & over rockeries. Then your eye rests on a smooth rich green carpet of couch grass which is used for either a tennis court or croquet lawn. These passtimes being much
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indulged in, in spite of the hot climate. A short distance away are the labour buildings or "Buries"; "Vali Mati" (hospital) (each plantation has by order of government a house set apart for the sick). Work on the plantation generally starts at 6 o'clock A.M., then the planter or overseer musters his men, calls the roll, has a horse brought up from the paddock and saddled, which he mounts & off they go to what-ever direction or directions the work of the day lay. There may be one gang of men planting or preparing land for one kind of product & another gang in another direction cultivating another kind, or perhaps erecting a shelter-shed for a crop of "sila" (maize) or "Uvi"(?) (yams) that is ready to
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be harvested. The planter starts one lot of men going with their days "caka caka" (labour or work) then he rides on to set the next lot to work & gives his instructions, & so on all around till he sees a good start made, riding around in the fresh morning air, his horse brushing the dew from the undergrowth which is very thick, & the dew generally very heavy, - wends his way home with his master lazily sitting in the saddle whistling & thinking about the inner man for it is getting breakfast time. A good substantial meal is put before him, & his family are all up by this time & gathered around the table with a black boy to wait on them. After breakfast there are usually a
page 5
few little things to see about the house, a little gardening to be done, some banana or guava trees to be seen to, or a grenadilla vine to be trained etc. A good deal of fruit is indulged in during the morning, - when one is going through a nice patch of "vundi" (bananas) with yellow bunches hanging here & there it is a great temptation just to try one or two, or a nice ripe pineapple, soursop, mango, or any other of these luscious tropical fruits. Then after a walk round his homestead a lounge in a hammock on the spacious verandah or a little odd job is done, the planter jumps on his horse again & takes another tour around the plantation to see how the work is progressing. Sometimes he has a great deal of trouble with the men, who are very fond of malingering. There
page 6
are different kinds of labour employed on plantations in Fiji, very few planters employ native labour; they generally work the land by Coolies or Polynisians, or, as they are called in Queensland, Kanakas. After he sees that all is going well & has had a good ride around (which is very pleasant, I can speak from experience as I have ridden around about a plantation myself many a time; being a planters daughter) and seen that each man is doing his alotted work, he finds his way home to dinner. After "Kakana" (partaking of food) is over, the planter generally finds he has some business to do at the sea-port or township, which will take him the best part of the afternoon, getting home just in time to see the labour "Knock off" work. Therefore on a
page 7
plantation the planter or overseer is in the saddle most of the day; but there are a great many days when the men have a "tavi" (set task), then the planter is not so much tied; the men know they have to do a certain thing & they put forth their energies to get through it, so the master goes off to enjoy himself, very often in the way of taking his wife, sister or daughter - as the case may be - to spend the afternoon with friends and have afternoon tea & a game of tennis or croquet, or join a riding party, or may be go shooting "songi" or "ruvi" (two different kinds of bush pigeons) which are most delicious eating, very like the English grouse in flavour. Saturday afternoon is often spent by young fellows in taking out the dogs for a pig hunt. This sport is a good deal
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indulged in, as there is plenty of fun & excitement to be got out of it, & sometimes it is very venturesome, I have known a wild boar with great white curling tusks, when bailed up by the dogs, make a desperate dart for liberty dashing between the legs of two young men upsetting them like ninepins; & while these sportsmen were picking themselves up and getting over their surprise, with feelings very much hurt at their undignified positions, the pig made good his escape. The dogs enjoy these hunts quite as much, if not more, than their masters. When the gun is taken down from its place, they dance about yelping, nearly mad with delight at the prospect of a good hunt, often they will go off by themselves & follow up the
page 9
trail of a pig & bail him up for hours in the bush, but if no one comes to their assistance they will wend their way home towards evening very much the worse for their outing, besmeared with blood & probably with a nasty flesh wound, or perhaps some more serious damage such as a broken rib, indeed often our canine members meet with their end in fearless combat with these wild animals. The Kanakas set traps for the "vuaka" (pig) by digging a very deep hole then covering it lightly over with twigs & leaves. The pig innocently enough walks over or endeavours to walk over what he thinks is solid ground; when to his surprise down he goes with a grunt, & there he stays till his trappers come and carry him to their "buri" (house) & enjoy him for supper.
page 10
There are some plantations on which little else but sugar cane is grown. It is a beautiful sight to see acres & acres under cane planted at different times, thereby you may see on one plantation - with a large area under cultivation - sugar cane in all its stages; in one direction a field of young green leaves waving too & fro in the wind, apparently as level as a table, each cane having grown almost to the same height. A little further on a field of what looks like swords held very erect & pointing straight up to the sky, this is cane coming into blossom; in another direction you see the cane in full bloom; this is, I think, the prettiest stage to look upon, the blossom is very light & feathery, very like that of pampas grass only tinged with a
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delicate purple hue - cane is very seldom allowed to grow to this stage as it is redy for crushing before it flowers.
There are other plantations abounding with cocoanut trees. The nuts of which are made into copra & exported. Cattle are bred more extensively on cocoanut plantations than on any other as the animals can roam about among the trees & feed on the undergrowth without damaging the trees. And there are other planters who go in for a little of everything such as maize, yams, bananas, pine-apples etc & often breed cattle, pigs, etc.
The busiest time of a planters life is when the
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crops are ready for gathering & he is exporting fruit or otherwise disposing of his products. Home life on a plantation in Fiji is perhaps a little monotonous. Apart from the family interests there is little else to occupy oneself with when the days work is over. There being no evening amusements except what may be got up by a few energetic people, such as a local concert & perhaps a dance afterwards, or a card & supper party, music evenings, and such like. There are no streets for the gentler set to parade in, & show off the latest fashion, or gaily decorated shop windows on which to flatten ones nose. A large general store is more
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to the purpose; which, from the outside appearance is a great barn, but the interior presents a more pleasing aspect, & you can purchase almost every thing you want, from a needle to an anchor.
Children on Plantations generally have a good long walk or ride to school; & if there is no school at a get-at-able distance then lessons are heard at home. The mother has plenty to do in looking after her house-hold duties & her children, as there are no European maids employed on the plantations, except perhaps a governess sometimes. The domestics are all Kanakas or Coolies, & make very good
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servants when well trained; but it is very trying and tedious work training them. A planters life in Fiji is on the whole one of ease and comfort, but I have not now space to expand on these advantages.
(Transcribed by Geoffrey Barber c1987, original held by Julitha Barber, great granddaughter of Florence McKay (nee Ward), Perth Western Australia.)

Family

Jane Little b. 26 Aug 1831, d. 21 Nov 1893
Marriage*
Thomas Ward married Jane Little, daughter of William Little and Mary (?), on 9 June 1862 at All Hallows London Wall, London, England.4 
Children

Citations

  1. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) "GS Film number: 990889."
  2. [S67] 1841 Census for England "HO107 piece 1333 folio 2/28 page 20."
  3. [S16] 1851 Census for England "HO107 piece 2319 folio 141 page 21."
  4. [S399] Marriage certificate of Thomas Ward and Jane Little, married 9 Jun 1862 in the Registration District of All Hallows London Wall, London, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 1c Page 135).
  5. [S297] Webpage The Argus (Melbourne) (http://trove.nla.gov.au/) "1870 'THE FIJI ISLANDS.', The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), 19 October, p. 6, viewed 19 March, 2013, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5836433."
  6. [S405] Webpage The Empire (Sydney) (http://trove.nla.gov.au/) "1871 'LATER NEWS FKOM FIJI.', Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875), 4 May, p. 3, viewed 19 March, 2013, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60871701."
  7. [S404] Rondo B. B. Me, "Kaivalagi ni Viti: Census of Europeans Resident in Fiji 1874-5", Max Marketing and Publishing Ltd, First Edition (2003) unknown isbn.
  8. [S400] Death certificate of Thomas Ward, died 26 Dec 1881, registered 16 Jan 1882 in the Registration District of Levuka, Fiji (Reference no: 53/1881).
  9. [S403] Webpage The Australasian Sketcher (http://trove.nla.gov.au/) "1882 'Family Notices.', The Australasian Sketcher with Pen and Pencil (Melbourne, Vic. : 1873 - 1889), 28 January, p. 31, viewed 14 March, 2013, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60620654."
  10. [S297] Webpage The Argus (Melbourne) (http://trove.nla.gov.au/) "1882 'Family Notices.', The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), 18 January, p. 1, viewed 14 March, 2013, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article11529563."

Thomas Ward

b. circa 1797
     Thomas Ward was born circa 1797 at Yorkshire, England.1
Thomas Ward married Elizabeth Harrison, daughter of William Harrison and Sarah Littlewood, on 15 February 1818 at Sheffield, Yorkshire, England.
Thomas Ward was a book keeper on 21 June 1840.2
On 21 June 1840 Thomas Ward and Elizabeth Harrison lived at Canal Cottage, Attercliffe, Sheffield, Yorkshire, England, (from Sheffield Baptisms, Harrison Ward 21 Jun 1840.)
Thomas Ward was a collector on 7 June 1841.3
On 7 June 1841 Thomas Ward and Elizabeth Harrison lived at Canal Side, Attercliffe, Sheffield, Yorkshire, England, with children Jane, Elizabeth, Thomas, Edwin, Harrison and female servant Ann Westren.3
A possibility for Thomas Ward in the 1851 census is at Great Grimsby in Lincolnshire, where a Thomas Ward is a lodger, widower, age 54 (ie born c1797), a book keeper, place of birth is written as Yorkshire: Richmond Handsworth Woodhouse. Wikipedia notes that Richmond and Woodhouse are areas included in the Handsworth parish. This is probably the correct Thomas as his occupation was recorded as book keeper on Harrison Ward's baptism in 1840.4,1
Thomas Ward was a collector on 9 June 1862.5

Family

Elizabeth Harrison b. c 1799
Marriage*
Thomas Ward married Elizabeth Harrison, daughter of William Harrison and Sarah Littlewood, on 15 February 1818 at Sheffield, Yorkshire, England
Children

Citations

  1. [S16] 1851 Census for England "Class: HO107; Piece: 2113; Folio: 250; Page: 9; GSU roll: 87742."
  2. [S419] Birth certificate of Harrison Ward, born 8 Jan 1840, registered 21 Jan 1840 in the Registration District of Sheffield, Yorkshire, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 22 Page 551).
  3. [S67] 1841 Census for England "HO107 piece 1333 folio 2/28 page 20."
  4. [S137] Website "Wikipedia" (http://en.wikipedia.org/) "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Handsworth,_South_Yorkshire."
  5. [S399] Marriage certificate of Thomas Ward and Jane Little, married 9 Jun 1862 in the Registration District of All Hallows London Wall, London, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 1c Page 135).