Stillborn Barber

b. 1896, d. 1896
FatherWilliam Barber b. 16 Jan 1874, d. 2 Nov 1952
MotherAda Morris b. 27 Aug 1874, d. 25 May 1963
     Stillborn Barber was born in 1896 at Brighton, Sussex, England.
Stillborn Barber died in 1896 at Brighton, Sussex, England. Stillborn. He was the son of William Barber and Ada Morris.
Uncle Bob (Douglas Robert Barber) said he was strangled by his umbilical chord during birth.

Stillborn Barber

b. 21 November 1845, d. 21 November 1845
FatherRobert Barber b. 6 Jul 1802, d. 4 Feb 1867
MotherJane Holden b. 17 Oct 1802, d. 28 Oct 1882
     Stillborn Barber died on 21 November 1845 at Brighton, Sussex, England.1
Stillborn Barber was born on 21 November 1845 at Brighton, Sussex, England.1 He was the son of Robert Barber and Jane Holden.

Citations

  1. [S272] Copy of Letter from Victoria and Albert Griffiths, to Rita and Fred Barber, dated 1 June 1980 (GG Barber Private Archives, Perth, W. Australia) ""Brothers and Sisters of Grandfather Barber" attached to letter."

stillborn Barber

b. 1886, d. 1886
FatherHerbert Wells Barber b. 20 Apr 1847, d. 16 Nov 1915
MotherSarah Postlethwaite b. 1 Apr 1849, d. 6 Aug 1917
     Stillborn Barber died in 1886 at New Jersey, United States.
Stillborn Barber was buried in 1886 at Brookside Cemetery, Englewood, New Jersey, United States.
Stillborn Barber was born in 1886 at New Jersey, United States. She was the daughter of Herbert Wells Barber and Sarah Postlethwaite.

stillborn Barber

b. 1 September 1896, d. 1 September 1896
FatherHerbert Wells Barber b. 20 Apr 1847, d. 16 Nov 1915
MotherSarah Postlethwaite b. 1 Apr 1849, d. 6 Aug 1917
     Stillborn Barber died on 1 September 1896 at New Jersey, United States.
Stillborn Barber was born on 1 September 1896 at New Jersey, United States.
Stillborn Barber was buried after 1 September 1896 at Brookside Cemetery, Englewood, New Jersey, United States. He was the son of Herbert Wells Barber and Sarah Postlethwaite.

Susannah Barber

b. 25 April 1826
FatherRobert Barber b. 6 Jul 1802, d. 4 Feb 1867
MotherJane Holden b. 17 Oct 1802, d. 28 Oct 1882
     Susannah Barber was born on 25 April 1826 at 111 Jermyn St, St James, Westminster, London, England; a twin, born at 5 minutes after 6 o'clock in the morning.1 She was the daughter of Robert Barber and Jane Holden.
Susannah Barber was baptized on 2 August 1829 at St Nicholas, Brighton, Sussex, England.2
On 7 June 1841 Susannah Barber lived at Gardiner St, Brighton, Sussex, England, with her parents and family.3

Citations

  1. [S272] Copy of Letter from Victoria and Albert Griffiths, to Rita and Fred Barber, dated 1 June 1980 (GG Barber Private Archives, Perth, W. Australia) ""Brothers and Sisters of Grandfather Barber" attached to letter."
  2. [S156] Baptisms, Marriages & Burials of St Nicholas Church, Brighton, Sussex, England, (ESRO: PAR 255/1).
  3. [S67] 1841 Census for England "HO107 piece 1121 folio 6/40 page 23."

Susannah Barber

b. 12 June 1804
FatherStephen Barber b. 1762
MotherLydia Best
     Susannah Barber was baptized on 12 June 1804 at Leigh, Kent, England.1 She was the daughter of Stephen Barber and Lydia Best.

Citations

  1. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) "GS Film number: 992527."

Thomas Barber

b. 7 June 1822, d. 4 July 1823
FatherRobert Barber b. 6 Jul 1802, d. 4 Feb 1867
MotherJane Holden b. 17 Oct 1802, d. 28 Oct 1882
     Thomas Barber was born on 7 June 1822 at 7 Portland St, Brighton, Sussex, England; born at 7 minutes after 7 o'clock in the evening.1 He was the son of Robert Barber and Jane Holden.
Thomas Barber was baptized on 14 July 1822 at Brighton, Sussex, England.
Thomas Barber died on 4 July 1823 at Brighton, Sussex, England, at age 1.1
Thomas Barber was buried on 8 July 1823 at St Nicholas, Brighton, Sussex, England.

Citations

  1. [S272] Copy of Letter from Victoria and Albert Griffiths, to Rita and Fred Barber, dated 1 June 1980 (GG Barber Private Archives, Perth, W. Australia) ""Brothers and Sisters of Grandfather Barber" attached to letter."

Thomas Barber

b. 29 March 1775, d. 2 July 1857
FatherThomas Barber b. 20 Oct 1752, d. Aug 1821
MotherMary Lipscomb b. 8 Dec 1756, d. 5 Dec 1841
Brighton c1830 - Marine Parade and Chain Pier (opened 25 Nov 1823)
     Thomas Barber was born in 1775 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.
Thomas Barber was baptized on 29 March 1775 at Tonbridge, Kent, England. He was the son of Thomas Barber and Mary Lipscomb.
Sometime before 1802 Thomas left Tonbridge and moved to Brighton in Sussex. This may have had something to do with an inheritance from his grandfather Robert Lipscombe in 1799/1800. Although Robert Lipscomb's will has not been found, Thomas's mother Mary Barber mentions in her will made in 1838 that Robert Lipscombe's will (probated in December 1799) made special provision for her two eldest sons, Thomas and Robert, and as a result were excluded from the future distribution of the monies and property held in trust for Mary from her father's will. This may have prompted Thomas to move to Brighton to start his business as a cabinetmaker/undertaker.
In those days the cabinet maker who made the coffins also acted as the undertaker. Thomas's grandson, Thomas Ashhurst, is recorded in the 1851 census as a 14 year old coffin maker suggesting that he worked for his grandfather.1,2
Thomas would probably have served an apprenticeship in order to become a cabinet maker. Since 1563 it was illegal for anyone to enter a trade if they had not served an apprenticeship and this remained the case until 1814. Most apprenticeship agreements have not survived because they were simply personal contracts (indentures) between two parties. However from 1710 stamp duty was payable on these indentures at a rate of 6d for every £1 the master received for taking on the apprentice (with some exceptions). It is these records which have survived. A search for Thomas Barber showed only one possible entry: 29 August 1791 (the date the duty was paid) where Richard Shoobridge of Tenterden, Kent, cabinetmaker, took on a Thomas Barber as an apprentice.3
Tenterden is about 25 miles away from Tonbridge and so one has to be cautious in accepting that this is the correct Thomas Barber. Thomas's brother James was apprenticed as a cordwainer to Thomas Skinner in Tonbridge on 30 Jun 1808. A cordwainer (or cordovan) is a shoemaker/cobbler who makes fine soft leather shoes and other luxury footwear articles. James married in 1820 in Salehurst in Sussex and worked there as a cordwainer before his death in 1826. While James did his apprenticeship in Tonbridge, he married and worked in Salehurst, Sussex about 20 miles away. Given that most of Thomas's siblings did move a reasonable distance away from Tonbridge the apprenticeship in Tenterden may indeed be for our Thomas although we cannot be sure.
Thomas Barber married Mary Lane on 4 February 1802 at St Nicholas Church, Brighton, Sussex, England.4
Thomas and Mary lived at 4 Regent Row in Brighton for most of their lives (1836 Brighton voters list, 1841 and 1851 census). Mary died on 21 June 1841 aged 72 years, and sometime after 1851 Thomas moved to Keymer with his widowed daughter Rebecca Ashurst and her family.5,6,7
Thomas Barber witnessed the will of Mary Lipscomb dated 17 April 1838 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.1
Thomas' mother Mary Barber died in Tonbridge, Kent on 5 Dec 1841.1
In the 1851 census, Thomas is still living at 4 Regent Row in Brighton with his widowed daughter, Rebecca, and her children. It is this census record that gives Thomas Barber's place of birth as Tonbridge in Kent, providing the important connection to earlier generations of Barbers. Soon after 1851, the family moved to St John's Common in Keymer. The death of Rebecca's eldest son, Robert Ashurst, in 1851 may have been a factor.2
Rebecca had a lot of misfortune in her life. In 1828 she married Robert Lewis Ashhurst, a school master, teacher of languages and a stationery dealer. He is reported in the London Gazette on 15 November 1833 as financially insolvent and appears to have been held in a debtor's prison. He died in 1839 leaving Rebecca with three young children. She then lived with her parents and remained with her father until he died in 1857. Her three children died before her in 1851, 1858 and 1870 and only one grandchild, Annie Rebecca Ashhurst, survived. Annie also had misfortune as shown in the 1871 census where she was only 9 years old and living at 22 Wood St, Brighton with her maternal grandmother Sarah Funnell as both her parents and her brother had died.
Rebecca married for a second time in 1859 to Charles Shaw who was aged 65 years and who died only five years later. She died a widow in 1886 age 75 years.8
Thomas Barber left a will made on 10 February 1855.9
Thomas Barber died on 2 July 1857 at Albert Villas, St John's Common, Keymer, Sussex, England, at age 82. He died of natural decay. His death certificate states that he is a retired undertaker.10
"This is the last Will and Testament of me, Thomas Barber, of Brighton in the County of Sussex, cabinet maker. I give and bequeath all my ready money furniture goods chattels and effects now in and about my dwelling house where I now reside unto my Daughter Mrs Rebecca Ashurst for her absolute use and benefit. And as to all Monies due to me on Mortgage or otherwise I give and bequeath the same unto and equally between my said Daughter and my son Robert Barber. And I give devise and bequeath all the estates which at my death shall be vested in me upon any trusts or by way of Mortgage unto Charles Henry Smith of Hurst Green Sussex Auctioneer and George Attree of Brighton Auctioneer their heirs executors and administrators respectively according to the nature thereof respectively Upon the Trusts and subject to the Equity of Redemption which at my death shall be subsisting or capable of taking effect therein respectively but so that the money secured on such Mortgage be taken as part of my personal Estate And I appoint the said Charles Henry Smith and George Attree Executors of this my Will. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand this tenth day of February One thousand eight hundred and fifty five THOS BARBER signed by the said Testator as and for his last Will and Testament in the presence of us who in his presence and in the presence of each other hereunto set our names as witnesses Chas Chalk Solr, Brighton, Hy Llewellyn his clerk.
The Will of
Thomas Barber late of Brighton within the Archdeaconry of Lewes Cabinet Maker deceased was proved the tenth day of July in the year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and fifty seven Before the Reverend Richard Burnet Clerk Surrogate and so forth Upon the oaths of Charles Henry Smith and George Attree the Executors in the said Will named To whom was committed the administration of the goods etc. They being first sworn well and faithfully to administer the same and so forth Sworn also that the Goods Chattels and Credits of the said deceased did not amount in value unto four hundred and fifty pounds. Died at Keymer on or about the 2nd July 1857."
Thomas Barber was buried on 8 July 1857 at St Nicholas Church, Brighton, Sussex, England, of Hurstpierpoint in this County, 82 years old, John Ellerton, curate.11
The family were recorded on a monumental inscription at St Nicholas Church, Brighton, Sussex, England, which was transcribed as: "In memory of Thomas son of Thomas and Mary Barber who died August 14th 1830 in the 29th year of his age. Also Mary wife of Thomas Barber who died June 21st 1841 in the 73rd year of her age. Also Thomas Barber who died July 2nd 1853 aged 73 years". When I visited the church in 1988 the headstones in the churchyard were almost indecipherable and they had been removed from the graves and placed around the perimeter. I could not find the headstone mentioned above. The transcription was probably recorded some years ago and has a number of errors. The death date for Thomas son of Thomas and Mary should be August 14th 1836 as per burial records for St Nicholas Church (i.e. not 1830). The age at death ("in his 29th year") would then fit the baptism date for Thomas (15.11.1807). Also, the death date for the father, Thomas, should be 2nd July 1857 (not 1853). His age at death is also wrong and should be 82 years (not 73 years). Monumental transcriptions are notoriously difficult to transcribe due to weathering of the gravestone and mistakes like this are very common.
His estate was probated on 10 July 1857 at Archdeaconry of Lewes, Sussex, England.

Family

Mary Lane b. c 1769, d. 21 Jun 1841
Marriage*
Thomas Barber married Mary Lane on 4 February 1802 at St Nicholas Church, Brighton, Sussex, England.4
Children

Citations

  1. [S342] Will of Mary Barber of Tonbridge, Kent, England, made 17 Apr 1838, proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 17 Jan 1842. (TNA: PROB 11/1956/36).
  2. [S16] 1851 Census for England "Brighton, HO107 piece 1646 folio 528 page 3."
  3. [S268] Register of duties paid for apprenticeship indentures, 1710-1811. (TNA: IR1).
  4. [S156] Baptisms, Marriages & Burials of St Nicholas Church, Brighton, Sussex, England, (ESRO: PAR 255/1) "ESRO PAR255/1/1/10."
  5. [S4] Death certificate of Mary Barber, died 21 Jun 1841, registered 26 Jun 1841 in the Registration District of Brighthelmstone, Sussex, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 7 Page 175).
  6. [S67] 1841 Census for England "HO107 piece 1122 folio 9/10 page 12."
  7. [S16] 1851 Census for England "HO107 piece 1646 folio 528 page 3."
  8. [S258] Webpage The London Gazette (http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/) "Gazette Issue 19102 published on the 15 November 1833. Page 28 of 30."
  9. [S131] Will of Thomas Barber of Brighton, Sussex, England, made 10 Feb 1855, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 10 Jul 1857. (ESRO: PBT 1/1/85/963).
  10. [S5] Death certificate of Thomas Barber, died 2 Jul 1857, registered 7 Jul 1857 in the Registration District of Cuckfield, Sussex, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 2b Page 73).
  11. [S156] Baptisms, Marriages & Burials of St Nicholas Church, Brighton, Sussex, England, (ESRO: PAR 255/1) "PAR 255/1/5/11."

Thomas Barber

b. 15 November 1807, d. 14 August 1836
FatherThomas Barber b. 29 Mar 1775, d. 2 Jul 1857
MotherMary Lane b. c 1769, d. 21 Jun 1841
     Thomas Barber was born on 15 November 1807 at Brighton, Sussex, England. He was the son of Thomas Barber and Mary Lane.
Thomas Barber was baptized on 3 April 1808 at Chapel, Countess of Dissentarian Brightonants, Brighton, Sussex, England.
Thomas Barber died on 14 August 1836 at Brighton, Sussex, England, at age 28.
Thomas Barber was buried on 19 August 1836 at St Nicholas, Brighton, Sussex, England.

Thomas Barber

b. 20 October 1752, d. August 1821
FatherThomas Barber b. 8 Sep 1713, d. 1754
MotherElizabeth Waite b. 14 Feb 1715/16, d. Oct 1798
Thomas & Mary Barber signatures, 1801.
     Thomas Barber was born in 1752 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.
Thomas Barber was baptized on 20 October 1752 at Tonbridge, Kent, England. His father died two years later in 1754. He was the son of Thomas Barber and Elizabeth Waite.
On 19 October 1758 the Datchurst manorial court posthumously confirmed the succession of Thomas's father to the property held by his uncle who had died in 1749, and that the infant Thomas would be his heir. The delay of a number of years between one tenant dying and his successor being admitted to the property was not uncommon, and probably due to the courts not being held every year.1
At the manorial court held on 23 October 1764, the infant Thomas Barber (that is, aged under 21 years) came to the court with his mother Elizabeth and prayed to be admitted to that messuage or tenement, garden and two orchards, previously held by his father Thomas Barber who had died. This is their property in Hildenborough which was part of the manor of Datchurst.1
Thomas Barber married Mary Lipscomb, daughter of Robert Lipscomb and Elizabeth Webb, on 24 May 1774 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.
After Thomas's death in 1754 Elizabeth had received her right under common law to one third of her husband's property (or its money equivalent) and this was known as dower. Some twenty years later on 29th January 1776 Elizabeth released her dower to her 23 year old son Thomas for the nominal sum of 2 shillings. With Thomas's marriage in 1774 and Elizabeth approaching her 60th birthday she must have thought it was an appropriate time to do this. The release document survives and has Elizabeth's signature, showing that she could write. It clearly mentions the Draper's property in Sussex, Finches and Widow Mary Barber's house then divided into two dwellings. The document reads:
Indenture 29 January 1776 between Elizabeth Barber of Tonbridge, kent, widow, and relict of Thomas Barber late of the same place, malster, deceased, of the one part and Thomas Barber of Tonbridge aforesaid, son and heir of the said Thomas Barber deceased of the other part. Whereas the said Thomas Barber deceased was in his lifetime and at the time of his death seised in his demesne as of fee of and in all that messuage or tenement with the malthouse, barn, stable, yard, backside, garden and ground thereunto belonging or appertaining therewith now or late demised, letten, used, held, occupied or enjoyed containng by estimation one acre more or less, with appurtenances, lying at or near the lower end of the town of Tonbridge in Tonbridge aforesaid and heretofore in the tenure or occupation of the said Thomas Barber deceased, since of the said Elizabeth Barber and now or late of the said Elizabeth Barber and Thomas Barber, party hereto, or their or one of their assigns or undertenants, and those two pieces or parcels of land commonly called or known by the name of the Finches or howsoever called or known by containing by estimation four acres more or less, with its appurtenances, situated and being at or near Lodge end in the parish of Tonbridge heretofore in the tenure oroccupation of the said Thomas Barber deceased, since of the said Elizabeth Barber and now or late of the said Elizabeth Barber and Thomas Barber, party hereto, or their or one of their assigns or undertenants, and also of and in all that messuage or tenement now divided into two several habitations or dewellings with the yards, backsides, gardens and orchards thereunto respectively apportioned and belonging or therewith now or late severally demised, letten, used, held, occupied or enjoyed containing by estimation one [?] acre of ground more or less, with appurtenances, situated, lying and being in Hildenborough in Tonbridge aforesaid and now in the tenure or occupation of Widow Kemp and John Wells or one of them, their or one of their assigns or undertenants. The said Thomas Barber deceased dying intestate the said messuages, lands, tenements and hereditaments being of the nature and tenure of gavelkind in the County of Kent descended and came by and upon his decease, according to the tenure of gavelkind for Gavelkind Lands in the County of Kent, to the said Thomas Barber, party hereto, the only son and heir of the said Thomas Barber deceased, subject to the dower of the said Elizabeth Barber, his widow and relict, therein, being an interest in one moiety thereof during her widowhood according to the said custom. And whereas also the said Thomas Barber deceased was in his lifetime and at the time of his death seised in his demesne as fee of and in those several pieces or parcels of land arable, meadow, pasture and woodland commonly called or known by the name of Drapers, or howsoever otherwise called or known by, containing by estimation 24 acres more or less, with appurtenances, situated in the parish of Rotherfield in Sussex now in the tenure or occupation of William Peerless, his assigns or undertenants, and the said last mentioned lands and premises by and upon the decease of the said Thomas Barber descended and came to the said Thomas Barber, party hereto, as his only son and heir subject to the dower of the said Elizabeth Barber, being an interest in one third part thereof during her natural life according to the Common Law of England. Now this indenture witnesses that the said Elizabeth Barber in consideration of the natural love and affection which she hath and beareth to and towards the said Thomas Barber, party hereto, her son, and of the sum of 2s of lawful money of Great Britan to the said Elizabeth Barber in hand before the sealing and delivery of these presents paid to her by the said Thomas Barber, party hereto, and for divers other good causes and considerations her the said Elizabeth Barber thereunto especially moving, hath remised, released and for ever quitclaimed to the said Thomas Barber, party hereto, in his actual possession and to his heirs all the estate, right, title, interest, dower, right and title of dower either by the Common Law or cusom of gavelkind, claim and demand whatsoever of her the said Elizabeth Barber of and in the said several messuages, tenements, pieces or parcels of land, hereditaments and premises herein before mentioned and described, with their appurtenances, so the said Elizabeth Barber or any person claiming under her shall not nor will at any time hereafter have claim, challenge, or demand any right, title or interest of, in or to the said several messuages etc. or any part thereof or the rents, issues and profits thereof in respect of her dower either at the Common Law or by the custom of gavelkind but of and from the same and every part thereof she shall be absolutely excluded and debarred for ever by these presents.
[signed] Eliz Barber.
(Transcribed by Gillian Rickard, March 2013, for Geoffrey Barber.)2
The next day, in a deed dated 30 Jan 1776, Thomas Barber agreed to pay his mother Elizabeth Barber, widow, a £20 annuity for life out of the properties he had inherited, and on which Elizabeth had agreed to a release of dower. Although this deed has not been sighted, it is mentioned in a mortgage taken out on these properties in 1788.3
Between 1786 and 1793, Thomas and Mary appear to have lived in the nearby village of Ightham as they had children who were baptised there. The move to Ightham must have been associated with a business opportunity, as it resulted in some major financial transactions described below.
In 1787 Thomas sold the Drapers property in Rotherfield, Sussex to William Peerless. The property had been held in the family for nearly two hundred years. Although a contract of sale has not been found, the change of ownership is recorded in the Rotherfield land tax records. These records show that the Drapers property in Sussex had been leased to a John Parsons during the period 1750-1764 (the records start at 1750 so it may have been earlier) and then to William Peerless 1765-1787 which is the last year that "Mr Barber" is recorded as the owner.4
Thomas Barber was recorded as a maltster of Ightham, Kent in 1788.3
On 10 Oct 1788, Thomas and Mary Barber mortgaged their three properties - one acre of land at the lower end of Tonbridge, Finches and two dwellings and an acre of land in Hildenborough - to George Children of Tonbridge for the sum of 500 pounds. Thomas agrees to free the properties from claims for dower by his wife Mary and any entails on the property and he and Mary will record this at the Court of Common Pleas in London, which court dealt with property disputes etc. Thomas also says that he is lawfully seized of the property in fee simple - so there are no entails or claims on it by anyone else - and he has the right and power to mortgage the properties. The 500 pounds plus interest at 4.5% per annum is to be repaid to George Children at his house in Tonbridge on 10 April next and until this is done Thomas has the right to occupy the properties and to take the rents, profits etc.. If he does not repay these sums on the day fixed then George Children can occupy the properties and receive the rents etc. However, the right of Elizabeth Barber, widow, to take a 20 pound annuity for life out of the properties, conferred on her by a deed dated 30 January 1776, is preserved. Thomas Barber is to keep the premises insured for at least 400 pounds and if the properties are damaged by fire then the insurance money is to go towards paying off the mortgage money. (Gillian Rickard, Oct 2013.)3
The sale of the property Drapers and the mortgage of their remaining properties (Finches, the Tonbridge town site malthouse and land, and the Hildenborough House) to raise£500 soon after the family moved to Ightham suggests that Thomas may have needed the funds to purchase or build a malt house in Ightham or for some other related activity, as his occupation is stated as a "malster of Ightham" on the 1788 indenture. There is not much information available about the history of Ightham, but discussions with David Williams, a local historian who is co-writing a book on the history of Ightham, indicated that the 1780-1800 period was one of relative prosperity as it was a time of peace when the country houses were doing well. People from London were buying property in the area and the opening of turnpike (toll) roads was increasing the amount of travel.5
In 1790 Thomas Barber lived at Ightham, Kent, England.6
In 1790 Thomas is listed in the Poll for Knights of the Shire for Ightham as owning freehold house and land in Tunbridge occupied by William Jewhurst. William Jewhurst is mentioned on the 1788 indenture as the occupier of Finches. Perhaps he was also a malster who ran the Barber's malt house and hops field (Finches) after Thomas's father died unexpectedly in 1754?6
After 1793 the children's baptisms return to Tonbridge suggesting that they moved from Ightham back to Tonbridge.
Thomas is recorded in the 1798 national land tax assessments as owning and occupying a property in Tonbridge Town which was assessed for 2/- tax. He also owned and occupied a property in Hildenborough assessed at 4/- and another property in Barden at 8/-. Both Hildenborough and Barden are just outside Tonbridge. Thomas's father-in-law, Robert Lipscombe, also occupied a property in Barden owned by Geo. Children Esq. which was rated at £1. He also owned a property in Tonbridge Town which was occupied by John Latter and rated at 1/-.7
By 1801 the mortgage that Thomas and Mary had arranged in 1788 for £500 had not been repaid and interest had accrued. On 13 October 1801 the Hildenborough property was sold to George Children for £150. The property that the Widow Mary Barber acquired in 1691 finally passed out of the Barber family. It was not registered with the Datchurst manorial court until 12 November 1813 where it was still described as a "messuage or tenement, garden and two orchards".8,1
It is worth noting that the Tonbridge Bank collapsed on 7 December 1812 having a devastating effect on George Children and the other partners, with George declared bankrupt by 1817 and losing all his property. The late registration of the transfer with the Datchurst manor in 1813 was probably a case of George getting his affairs in order. Apparently he was a much loved figure in the town and there is a memorial to him in the Tonbridge parish church where he was buried in 1818. Six months after the collapse creditors were paid a quarter of what they were owed and possibly received more later. Many other single-branch country banks collapsed at this time caused by a monetary crisis brought about by Britain's foreign wars. Thomas and Mary appear to have had a long term relationship with George Children and it is possible that there was a link between the Hildenborough property transfer and the bank collapse, given George Children's involvement in both. This is an area for future research.
An indenture dated 26 December 1801 states that Thomas Barber had recently sold part of the mortgaged properties - it does not say which part - to William Wingate of Tonbridge, yeoman, for the sum of £425, leaving at the date of this indenture £360 4s 6d still owing on the mortgage to George Children. This indenture is a deed of sale to John Cheesman of the Finches property for the sum of £590, of which £360 4s 6d will be paid by John direct to George Children to completely discharge the mortgage and the balance of £229 15s 6d will be paid to Thomas Barber. Thomas and Mary state that they have full power and authority to sell Finches and neither they nor anyone connected to them or to Thomas Barber, the great-uncle of the present Thomas, or Thomas Barber, father of the present Thomas can have any further claim on the property being sold. (Gillian Rickard, Oct 2013.)9
The William Wingate mentioned in this document is likely a family relative, as the Wingates are mentioned in great uncle Thomas Barber's will of 1749. He is probably the son of William Wingate and Ann Jeffery, with Ann Jeffery being the daughter of William Jeffery and Elizabeth Barber (daughter of Thomas Barber and Mary Rootes).10
The property sold earlier to William Wingate can only be the town site lands, including the malt-house, as the other properties are accounted for. However, it also appears that part of this property was retained by the Barbers as the 1838 tithe map shows Mary Barber owing town site property where one would expect the malt-house. The original property was said to have about 1 acre of land (as stated on the 1788 mortgage) and the 1838 tithe map shows clearly that Mary Barber has 37 perches which is just under a ¼ acre and which appears to be a row of four shops on the High Street.
Thomas Barber witnessed the probate of the estate of Elizabeth Waite on 11 May 1808 at Consistory Court of Rochester, Kent, England.11
We do not know how the funds raised from the sale of Drapers and the 1788 mortgage were used, but it would appear that it involved a business venture in Ightham which was not particularly successful. The family moved back to Tonbridge c1793, and the repayment of the mortgage in 1801 resulted in the loss of the Finches property and some of the Tonbridge townsite land in addition to Drapers which had been sold in 1787. The only gain in assets appears to be some land in Barden near Tonbridge. The later sale of the house at Hildenborough in 1813 less than a year after the Tonbridge bank collapse raises further questions. Overall, one is left with the impression that a significant part of the family assets were lost during their life time. On the positive side, we do know from the will of Mary Barber (1838) that they had helped their two eldest sons financially to get established (although Mary's will indicates that this came from the estate of her father who died in 1798 - an estate valued at £1000), and that Mary was left with some properties in High St, Tonbridge (probably the remnants of the original malthouse complex) as well as some trust funds held under her late father's will, both of which which would have provided her with an income in old age.12
In considering the sale of these properties one must also be aware of the decline of the independent malster which occurred towards the end of their lives. Transport improvements removed the protection afforded by poor roads to the small inland breweries who used locally produced malt. The early 19th century also saw the decline of the publican brewer who was reliant on local malt-houses (or who had their own malt-houses) as commercially brewed beer became competitively priced and reliable. The smaller brewers began to disappear and ultimately, through amalgamation, larger and more centralised brewers, with their own large scale malt-houses, supplied the alehouses by rail or the improving roads. By the later 19th century the independent malster had all but disappeared.13
Thomas Barber died in August 1821 at Tonbridge, Kent, England, at age 68.
Thomas Barber was buried on 10 August 1821 at Tonbridge, Kent, England, aged 68 years.
Mary was to remain a widow for another 20 years.
Postscript: I recently purchased a copy of Wadmore's "Some Details of the History of the Parish of Tonbridge" which he published in 1906 and which contains the transcript of the last Court Baron for the manor of Tonbridge held on 5 November 1849. It mentions a parcel of land called "Wordsland" in the possession of James Alexander Esq., formerly Barber's, since John Jewhurst's; formerly in the occupation of William and John Jewhurst. James Alexander is also mentioned as having possession of "Fenches" [Finches], late Snellings, before Cheeseman's, formerly Barber's in the occupation of John Snelling. The Wordsland property is mentioned in John Jewhurst's will made 1839 and proved 1840. It describes the property as five acres more or less, in his own occupation, and at or near Lodge Oak in the parish of Tonbridge. This information allows the property to be located using the 1838 Tonbridge Tithe map and schedule, where it is identified as Plot 1747.14,15

Family

Mary Lipscomb b. 8 Dec 1756, d. 5 Dec 1841
Marriage*
Thomas Barber married Mary Lipscomb, daughter of Robert Lipscomb and Elizabeth Webb, on 24 May 1774 at Tonbridge, Kent, England
Children

Citations

  1. [S410] Court books of the manor of Datchurst, Lamport, Martin Abbey and Nizells, in Kent, England, 1718-1884 (KHLC: U55 M378).
  2. [S406] Indenture: Release of Dower between Elizabeth Barber and Thomas Barber, 29 Jan 1776, Tonbridge (KHLC: U1109 T17) Finches (4 acres) at Lodge Oak and other land, Tonbridge, 1716-1776.
  3. [S430] Indenture: Mortgage between Thomas Barber and George Children, 10 Oct 1788, Tonbridge (KHLC: U642/T/20).
  4. [S129] Will of William Peerless of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 9 Feb 1799, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 7 Nov 1800. (ESRO: PBT 1/1/68/507).
  5. [S548] Jean Stirk and David Williams, "Ightham at the Crossroads", Red Court Publishing, First Edition (2015) unknown isbn.
  6. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "Ancestry.com. UK, Poll Books and Electoral Registers, 1538-1893 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012."
  7. [S271] Inland Revenue, Land Tax Redemptions, 1798, United Kingdom (TNA: IR23,38).
  8. [S549] Indenture: Lease & Release (Hildenborough property) between Thomas and Mary Barber and George Children, 12 Oct 1801, Tonbridge, Kent (Tonbridge Library: TU1/M2/1).
  9. [S449] Indenture: Mortgage of Finches, Tonbridge Townsite Land & Hildenborough property between Thomas & Mary Barber and George Children, 26 Dec 1801, Tonbridge (KHLC: U642/T/20).
  10. [S341] Will of Thomas Barber of Tonbridge, Kent, England, made 16 May 1749, proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 16 Jun 1749. (TNA: PROB 11/770/346).
  11. [S1] Letters of administration of the estate of Elizabeth Barber of Tonbridge, Kent, England, granted by the Consistory Court of Rochester, 11 May 1808 (KHLC: DRb/Pa29).
  12. [S342] Will of Mary Barber of Tonbridge, Kent, England, made 17 Apr 1838, proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 17 Jan 1842. (TNA: PROB 11/1956/36).
  13. [S595] James Preston, "Malting and Malthouses in Kent", Amberley Publishing, First Edition (2015).
  14. [S631] Will of John Jewhurst of Tonbridge, Kent, England, made 19 Dec 1839, proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 3 Aug 1840. (TNA: PROB 11/1932/264).
  15. [S632] Beauchamp Wadmore, "Some Details of the History of the Parish of Tonbridge", M. Stonestreet, First Edition (1906) "p57."

Thomas Barber

b. 8 September 1713, d. 1754
FatherRichard Barber b. c 1673, d. 1722
MotherMargaret Wigzell b. 18 Jul 1688
     Thomas Barber was born in 1713 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.
Thomas Barber was baptized on 8 September 1713 at Tonbridge, Kent, England. He was the son of Richard Barber and Margaret Wigzell.
Thomas was only 9 years old when his father died in 1722.
Thomas worked with his uncle Thomas and became a malster. He was 29 years old when in 1743 they together purchased a property in Tonbridge Town (comprising a dwelling, malt-house, barn, etc.) and the four acre property Finches for £300. His uncle had occupied these properties and used them for his malting business since c1710. It is evident that they were in business together and the purchase of the property set up Thomas Barber the nephew to inherit from his unmarried uncle, which he did in 1749.
Thomas was the executor and main beneficiary of his uncle's will. He received all the "Messuages, Lands, Tenements and Hereditaments whatsoever and wheresoever in the Counties of Kent and Sussex" which would have included the town site property, Finches, Whites, the house in Hildenborough and the Drapers property in Rotherfield. Thomas married just months after receiving his inheritance, at the age of 36 years.1
Thomas Barber witnessed the will of Thomas Barber dated 16 May 1749 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.1
At the Datchurst manorial court held on 12 October 1749 he was admitted to the Hildenborough property:
"The Homage aforesaid upon their oaths present that Thomas Barber a customary tenant of the Manor of Datchurst dyed [died] seized [possessed] of a customary messuage, garden and two orchards lying by the King's highway to the east and lands by then held of [blank] Wickenden and [blank] Whitaker to the south, held by the said manor by copy of court roll by will of the lord according to the customs of the said manor and the yearly rent of six pence. And that he Devised the same to Thomas Barber".
This is the property previously owned by his uncle and before that his grandmother, the widow Mary Barber.2
Thomas Barber married Elizabeth Waite, daughter of John Waite and Elizabeth Low, on 12 November 1749 at Morden College, Charlton, Kent, England.3 Although the marriage was at Charlton, about 25 miles from Tonbridge, it contained the important information that Thomas was "of Tunbridge". People from all parts of the County were married at Morden College and it was similar to Gretna Green, which was known as a place where many people eloped to be married. Morden College was founded and richly endowed in 1700 by Sir John Morden for wholesale traders, master merchants and manufacturers of good character who, from misfortune or accident, became distressed. Sir John Morden, in founding the College, decreed that it should be run so that all the residents should live as comfortable as possible and "that having lived like gentlemen they might so die". It still survives today at 19 St Germans Place, Blackheath, London and continues to help the elderly suffering financial hardship.
The marriage states that Elizabeth is "of Lee". Lee is a parish very close to Charlton but there are no Waites in the Lee parish registers so it is almost certain that "Leigh" was intended, as it is adjacent to Tonbridge and has many Waite families.
The Tonbridge Overseers of the Poor rating assessment of 2 August 1754 indicates that Thomas Barber occupied properties called Finches, Whites, other lands in Tonbridge Town area (the malt-house, etc.) and Edmund's in Southborough West.4
The 1754 Poll for the Knights of the Shire, Kent (a list of people entitled to vote) records Thomas Barber owning freehold land in Tunbridge consisting of a house and land which he occupied. He was the only Barber listed for Tunbridge. The earlier 1734 poll lists no Barber's in Tonbridge as the freehold properties in Tonbridge were not purchased until 1743.5
Thomas Barber died in 1754 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.
Thomas Barber was buried on 17 December 1754 at Tonbridge, Kent, England, he was 41 years old.6
The grant of administration on Thomas' estate indicates that he died intestate (i.e. without a will).
His estate was probated on 4 February 1755 at Consistory Court of Rochester, Kent, England: 'On the Fourth day power was Granted to Elizabeth Barber widow the Relict of Thomas Barber late of the Parish of Tonbridge in the County of Kent Deceased to Administer the Goods & chattels of the said Deceased being first sworn duly to Administer.' It required her to exhibit an inventory of his goods and chattels in the court on or before the last day of July next ensuing (1755) and also to render an account of her administration to the court on or before the last day of January 1756.7
Although Thomas died intestate, control of the properties passed to his widow Elizabeth. The Overseers of the Poor rate assessments of 1756 and 1762 record them in her name. In 1776 she passed them to her son Thomas (at age 23 years) when she signed a "Release of Dower" to his benefit. In return, Thomas agreed to pay his mother an annuity of £20 p.a.8
The Rotherfield Land Tax records show that the Drapers property in Sussex was leased to a John Parsons during the period 1750-1764 (the records start at 1750 so it may have been earlier), and leased to William Peerless between 1765-1787, which is the last year that "Mr Barber" is recorded as the owner. Elizabeth released Drapers to her son Thomas Barber in 1776 and he must have sold the property in 1787 as thereafter, the owner is William Peerless. William died in 1800 leaving a will dated 9 Feb 1799 in which he states his occupation is a glover and fellmonger, and that the Drapers property is to go to his son Henry Peerless of Speldhurst, Kent. His occupation of "fellmonger" is interesting, as in 1605 the then owner of Drapers, George Barber alias Nynne, is noted in manorial court records as being a "searcher of raw tanned leather", or fellmonger ("fell" means skins and "monger" means dealer), and indicates one of the possible uses of the Drapers land in addition to it's coppice or forestry value mention in Thomas Barber's 1683 will, and the pigs and husbandry mentioned in George Barber's 1617 will, and possibly even for corn (wheat) growing as mentioned in John Barber's will of 1589.9,10
According to the Tonbridge Overseers of the Poor rate assessment books, Elizabeth (or "Widow Barber") is recorded as the owner or occupier of Thomas' properties after 1756. By July 1762 she had given up using the property in Southborough herself and Samuel Mills appears to have been using it. The 1762 assessment shows that the annual rental value for Finches was £6, for Whites and other lands £8 and for Edmunds £13 10s, in all £27 10s. This was a modest sum and although they were not rich people, they were probably reasonably comfortable. The occupation of property worth £10 a year in rent was one of the ways in which legal settlement in a parish could be gained, and few people managed that amount.4

Family

Elizabeth Waite b. 14 Feb 1715/16, d. Oct 1798
Marriage*
Thomas Barber married Elizabeth Waite, daughter of John Waite and Elizabeth Low, on 12 November 1749 at Morden College, Charlton, Kent, England.3 
Children

Citations

  1. [S341] Will of Thomas Barber of Tonbridge, Kent, England, made 16 May 1749, proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 16 Jun 1749. (TNA: PROB 11/770/346).
  2. [S410] Court books of the manor of Datchurst, Lamport, Martin Abbey and Nizells, in Kent, England, 1718-1884 (KHLC: U55 M378).
  3. [S151] Index to West Kent Marriages, KFHS CD-ROM36, 1538-1812, compiled by Sydney Smith, 59 Friar Road, Orpington Kent BR5 2BW, England.
  4. [S126] Tonbridge Overseers of the Poor Rating Assessments, 1670-. (KHLC: P371/12/1-4).
  5. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "Ancestry.com. UK, Poll Books and Electoral Registers, 1538-1893 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012."
  6. [S133] Transcript of the Parish Register of Tonbridge, Kent, England, 1547-1730 (KHLC: TR 2451/20).
  7. [S2] Letters of administration of the estate of Thomas Barber of Tonbridge, Kent, England, granted by the Archdeaconry court of Rochester, 4 Feb 1755 (KHLC: DRa/Pa5).
  8. [S406] Indenture: Release of Dower between Elizabeth Barber and Thomas Barber, 29 Jan 1776, Tonbridge (KHLC: U1109 T17).
  9. [S124] Land tax of the manor of Rotherfield, Sussex, 1750-1779 (ESRO: XA31/34).
  10. [S129] Will of William Peerless of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 9 Feb 1799, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 7 Nov 1800. (ESRO: PBT 1/1/68/507).

Thomas Barber

b. 23 November 1750, d. circa 1751
FatherThomas Barber b. 8 Sep 1713, d. 1754
MotherElizabeth Waite b. 14 Feb 1715/16, d. Oct 1798
     Thomas Barber was born in 1750 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.
Thomas Barber was baptized on 23 November 1750 at Tonbridge, Kent, England. He was the son of Thomas Barber and Elizabeth Waite.
Thomas Barber died circa 1751 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.
Thomas Barber was buried circa 1751 There are no Barber burials from November 1750 to October 1752. It is considered that this first Thomas died and either the burial record was omitted from the register by mistake, or he was buried elsewhere. The age at death (69 years) on the burial record of the surviving Thomas BARBER supports the later baptism in 1752.

Thomas Barber

b. 12 May 1675, d. 1749
FatherThomas Barber alias Nynne b. 3 May 1640, d. 1683
MotherMary Rootes b. c 1647, d. 1732
     Thomas Barber was born in 1675 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.
Thomas Barber was baptized on 12 May 1675 at Tonbridge, Kent, England, He was their second son and never married.1 He was the son of Thomas Barber alias Nynne and Mary Rootes.
Thomas Barber witnessed the will of Thomas Barber alias Nynne dated 28 October 1683 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.2
Thomas became a malster and appears to have learnt his trade from John Meopham, a malster who is recorded as the previous occupier of the malt-house that Thomas came to lease and eventually own in Tonbridge Town. Malt is commonly barley grain that has been germinated by soaking in water and then halted by drying with hot air. This generates the enzymes necessary to convert the grain's starch into sugars, and a malster is the expert person responsible for this process. Malted grain is primarily used to make beer and Thomas probably became a supplier to a brewery.
Thomas's mother, Mary Barber, would probably have arranged an apprenticeship for him with John Meopham. John was also one of the witnesses to Thomas's father's will in 1683 indicating that he would have known the family well. Thomas was the younger son and so an apprenticeship would have been an appropriate means of securing his future given that his older brother Richard would inherit the family property (and who consequently took up farming in Hildenborough). An apprenticeship would have bound the young Thomas to John Meopham for five to seven years from the age of about 14 years becoming an extra worker in his household and subject to his authority. Mary would probably have seen this as a positive given that he no longer had his father. In the 17th century the payment of a fee or "premium" became usual in order to obtain an apprenticeship. In a list of Cambridgeshire apprenticeships c1730 the fee for a malster was typically £5 and the term of the apprenticeship seven years. Apprenticeships were a popular means of securing employment for sons and daughters, even amongst the gentry. The fee for top professional apprenticeships could be substantial and Elizabeth Weller of Tonbridge (who married John Austen in 1693 but became a widow in 1704) paid £140 to apprentice her son as an attorney in London in 1714 after he had finished his education at Sevenoaks School.3,4
In the 1710 Overseers of the Poor assessments Thomas is rated for property in Tonbridge Town comprising a house and malt-house and also for a property called Finches. We know that he was leasing these properties (and was not the owner) as a contract exists showing that he later purchased them in 1743. It would appear that Thomas lived in the house in Tonbridge and was in business for himself working in the malt-house. The Finches property (about 4 acres) and later another property called Whites may have been used to grow hops or barley.5
The town site property was described in the indenture of 1743 thus:
one messuage or tenement wherein John Meopham lately dwelt and wherein Thomas Barber the uncle now dwells and the barn, stable, malthouse, outhouses, edifices and buildings and the closes, yards, backsides, gardens and ground with the appurtenances thereto belonging or appertaining situate lying and being at or near the Lower end of Tonbridge town in Tonbridge aforesaid on the west side of the town and now in the tenure or occupation of the said Thomas Barber the uncle or his assigns, bounding and abutting to the High Street leading through the said town towards the east, to the tenement and backside formerly Elizabeth Walters towards the south and to the lands of Robert Weller Esquire towards the west and north.
A later indenture estimates it to be 1 acre "more or less" in area.
It is possible (but debateable) that this property (or the remnants of it) is the same property mentioned in 1838 Tithe Award for Tonbridge as being in High St and belonging to Mary Barber, i.e. plot 1411 comprising 4 houses and yards in an area of 37 perches (i.e. just under a quarter of an acre). The location on the tithe map shows it to be almost opposite the Bull Tavern (which no longer exists), which means it would be just north of the Vale Rd roundabout today (and on the left hand side). However, there is other information in a (sort of) census of the High St in 1780 which could put it at the end of the High Street opposite the Angel Hotel (refer Appendix II, "The Tonbridge of Yesterday" by Arthur Neve (1932).6,7,8,9
On 11 Dec 1716, the property "Finches" which was occupied (but not owned) by Thomas Barber was sold. "Conveyance by Mr. James Tolputt of Milton next Sittingbourne, gent, to George Hooper the elder of Tonbridge, gent, one messuage or tenement wherein John Meopham late dwelt and Thomas Barber now dwelleth, now in the occupation of Thomas Barber. Price £165. 11 December 1716." It is interesting to note that John Meopham was a witness to the will of Thomas' father who died in 1683.
The involvement of George Hooper is of interest and worth noting as the name appears on many of the Tonbridge documents, including the will of Edmund Latter which was made in 1654 in Tonbridge. According to Saggers (2011) the Hoopers were a family of lawyers whose founder was Nicholas Hooper, born c1550 and vicar of Shipbourne, who offered his services in writing wills, charters and indentures for his congregation and so began a business that was taken over by his son John and was then followed by four generations of George Hoopers of Tonbridge, the last one dying without issue c1759. They were one of the wealthy gentry families whose names were prominent in Tonbridge in the 18th century.10,11
The location of Finches has been determined as plot 1744 on the 1838 tithe map for Tonbridge which indicated that the field was used for growing hops. The location was revealed when land known as Finches was bought by James Alexander in 1820 and became part of Relfs Farm, a farm that bordered on Lodge Oak Farm. We know that Finches was 4 acres and the tithe map shows only one 4 acre plot on Relfs farm and that is plot 1744. In addition, various deeds relating to Finches refer to "the right of road, lane or way leading to Wickenden" and there is a lane that runs alongside plot 1744 which still exists today. The tithe map of 1838 was made as the railway was preparing to come to Tonbridge and it shows the future rail track. The necessary railway land is designated by the number of the original piece of land followed by the letter 'a'. The corner of plot 1744 was needed for the railway and it is designated as 1744a. It was necessary to accommodate the existing lane and right of way when the railway was built, resulting in a bridge being erected over the lane. Its origin is still evident today as the road is narrow and can accommodate only one car at a time. Nowadays the road joins Vale Road but a foot path still exists which continues to Tonbridge Town.
The name Finches passed out of use after it ceased to be a self-contained parcel of land and became merely another field of Relfs farm. Today the area is built up and known as Strawberry Vale.
In 1730 Mary Barber transferred her cottage in Hildenborough to her son Thomas. In the court book for the manors of Datchurst, Lamport, Martin Abbey and Nizells, 1718-1884, at the court on 13 October 1730, presented that Mary Barber, a customary tenant of the manor, was seised (ie had ownership) of a messuage or tenement, a garden and two orchards lying to the Kings highway from Tonbridge to Sevenoaks to the east and to the land late of Francis Skeffington to the south, at the yearly rent of 6d, and she devised (gave) the same to Thomas Barber [her son, 1675-1749]. This was less than two years before her death. The cottage was held by the Barber family until 1801.
In 1730, two years before her death, Mary Barber transferred her house in Hildenborough to Thomas, now her eldest surviving son. At the Datchurst, Lamport, Martin Abbey and Nizells manorial court held on 13 October 1730:
presented that Mary Barber, a customary tenant of the manor, was seised [i.e. had possession] of a messuage or tenement, a garden and two orchards lying to the Kings highway from Tonbridge to Sevenoaks to the east and to the land late of Francis Skeffington to the south, at the yearly rent of 6d, and she devised [gave] the same to Thomas Barber [her son, 1675-1749].
This is the entry from the actual manorial court roll while the copy that was given to Mary (with slightly different wording) also exists. She may have also transferred the freehold Drapers property in Rotherfield to him at this time. In any event, he would have inherited Drapers after her death in 1732.12,13
In 1731 Thomas Barber is recorded as a member of the homage and jury at a Datchurst, Lamport, Martin Abbey and Nizells manorial Court Baron showing that as a property holder his obligations included "suit" (attendance) at the lord's court. It is interesting to see that there were also two people from the Children family as later generations of Barbers had financial dealings with George Children (c1742-1818) who was one of the founders of the Tonbridge Bank.12
In the Overseers of the Poor rating assessments of 1733, 1736, and 1739, Thomas was rated for himself (this would be the house and malthouse in the town) and for Finches, Whites and other lands. We know that he had occupied (leased) Finches since 1710 and purchased it in 1743 but nothing is known of Whites. The "other lands" probably refers to his mother's house in Hildenborough.5
The 1734 Poll for the Knights of the Shire, Kent (a list of people entitled to vote) lists no Barber's in Tonbridge indicating that Thomas did not qualify. The basic qualification was to be male and to own freehold land worth at least 40 shillings (£2) p.a. in rent. However he is recorded in the poll for Rotherfield, Sussex as "Thomas Barber, abode Tunbridge" which was based on his ownership of the freehold Drapers property.
On 23 June 1743 George Hooper senior sold the Tonbridge Town properties (comprising the house, malt-house, etc.) and Finches to Thomas Barber and his nephew for £300 by a conveyance method known as lease and release. The nephew Thomas was thus set up to carry on the business after his uncle.8
INDENTURE 23 June 1743 between George Hooper of Tonbridge, gent, of the one part, and Thomas Barber of Tonbridge, malster, and Thomas Barber of the same place, malster, his nephew, of the other part. George Hooper for 5s to him in hand at or before the ensealing and delivery of these presents paid by Thomas Barber the uncle and Thomas Barber the nephew, or one of them, releases and discharges to Thomas Barber and Thomas Barber, the nephew, and their executors, administrators and assigns, and by these presents does bargain, sell and demise to Thomas Barber the uncle and Thomas Barber the nephew, and their executors, administrators and assigns, one messuage or tenement wherein John Meopham lately dwelt and wherein Thomas Barber the uncle now dwells and the barn, stable, malthouse, outhouses, edifices and buildings and the closes, yards, backsides, gardens and ground with the appurtenances thereto belonging or appertaining situate lying and being at or near the Lower end of Tonbridge town in Tonbridge aforesaid on the west side of the town and now in the tenure or occupation of the said Thomas Barber the uncle or his assigns, bounding and abutting to the High Street leading through the said town towards the east, to the tenement and backside formerly Elizabth Walters towards the south and to the lands of Robert Weller Esquire towards the west and north, and also one piece or parcel of land arable and pasture (now being divided into two severalls or parcels) called or known by the name of Finches, or howsoever otherwise called or known, containing by estimation four acres more or less lying in Tonbridge aforesaid likewise lately in the occupation of the said [Thomas – crossed out] John Meopham and now of the said Thomas Barber the uncle or his assigns, together with the lane thereunto leading and belonging, bounding and abutting to the lands called Wichenden [possibly should be Wickenden] now of David Polhill Esq. towards the east, north and south and to the lands of Jeffery Amhurst Esq. towards the west, together with all manner of houses, outhouses, edifices, buildings, trees, ways, passages, waters, watercourses, hedges, hedgerows, fences, rents, easements, profits, commodities, hereditaments and appurtenances whatsoever to the said messuage etc. belonging or appertaining, to have and to hold the said messuage etc. to Thomas Barber the uncle and Thomas Barber the nephew, and their executors, administrators and assigns from the date of these presents to the end of one year after, paying at the end of the said term the rent of one pepper corn if lawfully demanded, to the intent that Thomas Barber the uncle and Thomas Barber the nephew may be in actual possession of the said messuage etc.
(Also the corresponding indenture of sale, very large, not photographed, with receipt on back by George Hooper from Thomas Barber the uncle and Thomas Barber the nephew, both malsters, for £300.)
(Transcribed by Gillian Rickard, March 2013.)
Thomas Barber left a will made on 16 May 1749 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.14
The will was made only 12 days before he was buried suggesting that he knew his death was imminent.
"In the Name of God Amen I Thomas Barber of Tonbridge in the County of Kent Malster being sick and weak in Body but of sound and disposing Mind Memory and Understanding praised be God for the same Do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following First and Principally I commend my Soule into the hands of Almighty God my Creator hoping for Salvation through the Merits of Jesus Christ my Saviour and Redeemer and my Body I commit to the Earth decently to be Interred and Buryed at the Discretion of my Executor hereafter named Item I give devise and bequeath unto my Sister Elizabeth Jeffery one Annuity or Yearly Rent charge of forty shillings a Year for and during the Term of her natural Life to be paid quarterly out of the Messuage or Tenement and Land now in my own Occupation situate in Tonbridge aforesaid The first payment to begin and be made on the Quarter day which shall next happen after my decease And if it shall happen the Yearly Rent Charge or sum of forty shillings shall be behind or unpaid in part or in the whole by the space of Ten days after either or any of the Quarter Days on which the same ought to be paid That it shall and may be Lawfull to and for the said Elizabeth Jeffery and her Assigns into the said Messuage or Tenement Lands and Premises to Enter and to make Distress and Distresses for the same and the Distress and Distresses there taken to have take load and drive and Carry away and dispose of untill the said Annuity or Rent charge of Forty Shillings and all Arrears thereof together with all Costs and Charges in recovering the same shall be fully paid and satisfied Item I give and bequeath unto my Neices Elizabeth Barber Mary the now Wife of Francis Grassum of Lewisham in the said County of Kent Innholder Richard Barber of Foxbush my Nephew and Margarett Barber my Neice the sum of Ten pounds apeice of Lawfull Money of Great Britain to be paid to them respectively within one Year after my Decease by my Executor hereafter named Item I give and devise unto Ann the now Wife of William Wingate of Tonbridge aforesaid Yeoman the sum of Thirty pounds to be paid her within one Year after my Decease by my Executor hereafter named Item I give and bequeath unto William Wingate John Wingate Thomas Wingate Sarah Wingate and Ann Wingate the five Children of the said William Wingate by Ann his Wife the sum of Ten pounds apeice to be paid immediately after my decease to the said William Wingate their father for their respective Uses by my Executor hereafter named and that the Receipt of the said William Wingate their father shall be a full discharge to my Executor hereafter named for the same And I do hereby direct that the said William Wingate their father shall pay and be accountable for the said several sums of Ten pounds apeice by me bequeathed to the said William Wingate John Wingate Thomas Wingate Sarah Wingate and Ann Wingate to them respectively when they or either of them shall respectively attain to their Age or Ages of Twenty one Years Item I give and bequeath unto my Nephew John Jeffery Son of my Sister Elizabeth Jeffery the sum of Ten pounds to be paid to him within twelve Months after my decease by my Executor hereafter named Item I give devise and bequeath unto my Nephew Thomas Barber his Heirs Executors Administrators and Assigns All and every my Messuages Lands tenements and Hereditaments whatsoever and wheresoever in the Counties of Kent and Sussex and elsewhere in the Kingdom of Great Britain And all and singular my personal Estate ready Money Securities for Money Household Goods and Cattle and all other my Goods and Chattles whatsoever and wheresoever not before herein by me devised bequeathed and disposed of my Debts Legacies and Funeral Expences being first paid and satisfied Item I do hereby make ordain constitute and appoint my said Nephew Thomas Barber sole Executor of this my last Will and Testament hereby revoking and making void all former wills by me at anytime heretofore made In Witness whereof I the said Thomas Barber the Testator have to this my last Will and Testament contained in two sheets of paper sett my hand and Seal this sixteenth day of May in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and forty nine Tho Barber Signed sealed published and declared by the said Testator in the presence of us who in his presence and at his request have sett our hands as Witnesses hereunto the several Erasements being made between the third fourth fifth and sixth lines in the last sheet Geo Alchin Samll Burton Thos Landon
This Will was proved at London the Sixteenth day of June in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and forty nine before the Worshipfull
Robert Chapman Doctor of Laws Surrogate of the Right Worshipfull John Bettesworth also Doctor of Laws Master Keeper or Commissary of the Prerogative Court of Canterbury lawfully constituted by the Oath of Thomas Barber the sole Executor named in the said Will to whom Administration was granted of all and singular the Goods Chattels and Credits of the deceased being first sworn duly to Administer."
Transcribed by Rosie Ansell November 2012 from a downloaded copy supplied by Geoffrey Barber.
Thomas Barber died in 1749 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.
Thomas Barber was buried on 28 May 1749 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.
His estate was probated on 16 June 1749 at Prerogative Court of Canterbury, London, England.14
The will mentions no wife or children leaving one to conclude that he never married. He obviously had a very close relationship with his sister Elizabeth, who married William Jeffery, as he was very generous to her and her children in his will (especially daughter Ann who married William Wingate). It is possible that Elizabeth was a widow at the time the will was written as her husband is not mentioned and this could be another reason for his generosity. She may have even lived with Thomas at his house in Tonbridge.
Given the early death of his father in 1683 and his elder brother Richard in 1722, it is clear that Thomas played an important role in the family. One is left with the impression of a hard worker who prospered and cared for his family, ensuring an orderly transfer on his death. The family must have been very grateful to him.
All the property owned by Thomas (the malt-house in Tonbridge, Finches, the cottage in Hildenborough, etc.) was left to his nephew, Thomas Barber, who was the eldest son of his brother Richard Barber and wife Margaret. Their second son, Richard Barber, was left £10 possibly indicating that he had inherited by other means either through assistance in establishing himself earlier or by inheriting from his mother who we know was involved in farming at Foxbush in Hildenborough. Richard married Elizabeth Luffe on 30 January 1751 at Shipbourne and had a family of ten children, all baptised at the neighbouring village of Leigh. There is a conveyance of Nizell's Estate in Tonbridge and Leigh on 14 November 1848 showing lands occupied by a Richard Barber, likely a descendant of Richard and Elizabeth.14,15

Citations

  1. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) "source film number     0845142, 0845143."
  2. [S3] Will of Thomas Barber of Tonbridge, Kent, England, made 28 Oct 1683, proved in the Archdeaconry of Rochester, 14 Dec 1683. (KHLC: DRa/PW4).
  3. [S487] C.W. Chalklin "The Rural Economy of a Kentish Wealden Parish 1650-1750" in the The Agricultural History Review Vol X, 1962, Part 1., 1962, "see Table A for John Meopham, malster, 22 May 1704."
  4. [S542] Margaret Wilson, "Jane Austen's family and Tonbridge", The Jane Austen Society, First Edition (2001) "pp. 14-17."
  5. [S126] Tonbridge Overseers of the Poor Rating Assessments, 1670-. (KHLC: P371/12/1-4).
  6. [S406] Indenture: Release of Dower between Elizabeth Barber and Thomas Barber, 29 Jan 1776, Tonbridge (KHLC: U1109 T17).
  7. [S195] Kent Archives Service, Tithe Map, 1838, Tonbridge, Kent (Compact Disc, now available https://www.TheGenealogist.co.uk/).
  8. [S543] Indenture: Lease and Release (Tonbridge Town property & "Finches") between George Hooper and Thomas Barber & Thomas Barber (nephew), 23 Jun 1743, Tonbridge, Kent (KHLC: U1109 T17).
  9. [S731] Arthur H. Neve, "The Tonbridge of Yesterday", Tonbridge Free Press Ltd, Revised Edition (1934) "Appendix II."
  10. [S407] Somerhill estate (Woodgate family) papers 1570-1919. Finches (4 acres) at Lodge Oak and other land, Tonbridge, 1716-1776. (KHLC: U1109 T17).
  11. [S544] J.G. Saggers, "The Life and Times of Warners Solicitors", Jester Books, First Edition (2011) unknown isbn "p. 2."
  12. [S410] Court books of the manor of Datchurst, Lamport, Martin Abbey and Nizells, in Kent, England, 1718-1884 (KHLC: U55 M378).
  13. [S534] Various Papers of the manor of Datchurst alias Hilden, Kent, England, 1608-1808 (KHLC: TU1/M2/1).
  14. [S341] Will of Thomas Barber of Tonbridge, Kent, England, made 16 May 1749, proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 16 Jun 1749. (TNA: PROB 11/770/346).
  15. [S545] Somerhill Estate deeds, maps and papers, Tonbridge, Kent, 1570-1919. (KHLC: U 1109).

Thomas Barber

b. 14 December 1755
FatherRichard Barber b. 9 May 1716, d. 1786
MotherElizabeth Luffe b. 4 Jun 1730
     Thomas Barber was baptized on 14 December 1755 at Leigh, Kent, England.1 He was the son of Richard Barber and Elizabeth Luffe.

Citations

  1. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) "GS Film number: 992527."

Thomas Barber

b. 24 March 1833
FatherRichard Barber b. 5 Dec 1790
MotherElizabeth (?) b. 1796
     Thomas Barber was baptized on 24 March 1833 at Sevenoaks, Kent, England.1 He was the son of Richard Barber and Elizabeth (?)

Citations

  1. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) "GS Film number: 1473692, Reference ID: yr 1813-1834 p 274."

Thomas Herbert Barber

b. 22 June 1917, d. 13 June 1996
FatherHerbert Frederic Barber b. 9 Sep 1884, d. 20 Feb 1977
MotherHelene Beatrice Espley b. c 1885, d. b 1977
     Thomas Herbert Barber was born on 22 June 1917 at Englewood, New Jersey, United States.1,2 He was the son of Herbert Frederic Barber and Helene Beatrice Espley.
Thomas Herbert Barber died on 13 June 1996 at 34481 Ocala, Marion, Florida, United States, at age 78.2,3

Citations

  1. [S704] 1925 State Census for New York, USA "New York State Archives; Albany, New York; State Population Census Schedules, 1925; Election District: 01; Assembly District: 21; City: New York; County: New York; Page: 4."
  2. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "Ancestry.com. U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015."
  3. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "Ancestry.com. Florida Death Index, 1877-1998 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004."

Victor Robert Barber

b. 1900, d. 1901
FatherRobert John Barber b. 1864
MotherElizabeth Austin b. 1858
     Victor Robert Barber was born in 1900 at Wandsworth, London, England.1 He was the son of Robert John Barber and Elizabeth Austin.
Victor Robert Barber died in 1901 at Wandsworth, London, England.2

Citations

  1. [S142] General Register Office: Indexes to Births, Sep 1837-2006, "Oct-Dec 1900, Wandsworth RD, Vol 1d Page 704."
  2. [S141] General Register Office: Indexes to Deaths, Sep 1837 - 2006, "Jul-Sep 1901, Wandsworth, Vol 1d Page 427, age 0."

Walter Barber

b. circa 1852, d. 27 October 1886
FatherHesketh Davis Wells b. 6 Aug 1806, d. 22 May 1873
MotherMary Esther Barber b. 15 Apr 1821, d. 26 Feb 1858
Photograph labelled "Uncle Walter". (Courtesy of Tyler S. Barber, 2014)
     Walter Barber was born circa 1852 at Deptford, Kent, England.1 He was the son of Hesketh Davis Wells and Mary Esther Barber.
On 7 April 1861 Walter Barber lived at 44 Douglas St, Deptford, Kent, England.2
Walter Barber was an underwriter's clerk on 2 April 1871.3
On 2 April 1871 Walter Barber lived at 72 Douglas St, Deptford, Kent, England, a lodger.3
Walter Barber married Marian Fleming, daughter of John Fleming and Catherine Buck, in 1875 at Greenwich, Kent, England.4
Walter and Marian Barber are buried in the same grave at Brockley cemetery. Also in this grave is a Herbert Horton Barber who died 1874 and who may be a son of Walter and Marian, born before they married. So far, no baptism for him has been found, suggesting perhaps a stillborn child (whose births were not registered until 1926). There is also a John Fleming buried in the grave in 1892 age 59 years, probably Marian's father. (Source: http://www.nwkfhs.org.uk/ladyw558.htm.)
Walter Barber was a commercial clerk shipping on 3 April 1881.5
On 3 April 1881 Walter Barber and Marian Fleming lived at 4 Endwell Road, Deptford, Kent, England.5
Walter Barber worked in shipping as a clerk but remained in south east London all his life. His son Herbert Frederick Barber emigrated to the States (perhaps he joined the Barber shipping line).
Walter Barber died on 27 October 1886 at 4 Endwell Road, Brockley, Kent, England.6
Walter Barber was buried on 2 November 1886 at Ladywell & Brockley Cemetery, Lewisham, Kent, England, Plot B 70, unconsecrated.
His estate was probated on 27 November 1886 at Kent, England.7
The probate record reads: The will of Walter Barber late of 4 Endwell Road, Brockley in the County of Kent, Accountant, who died 27 October 1886 at 4 Endwell Road was proved at the Principal Registry by Marian Barber of 4 Endwell Road, widow, the relict, the sole Executrix. Personal Estate £85.2s.6d.

Family

Marian Fleming b. c 1856, d. 22 Jun 1933
Marriage*
Walter Barber married Marian Fleming, daughter of John Fleming and Catherine Buck, in 1875 at Greenwich, Kent, England.4 
Children

Citations

  1. [S68] 1861 Census for England, "Class: RG 9; Piece: 395; Folio: 139; Page: 30;."
  2. [S68] 1861 Census for England, "RG 9; Piece: 395; Folio: 139; Page: 30."
  3. [S69] 1871 Census for England, "RG10; Piece: 743; Page: 24;."
  4. [S143] General Register Office: Indexes to Marriages, Sep 1837 - 2006, "Apr-Jun 1875, Greenwich, Vol 1d Page 1088."
  5. [S70] 1881 Census for England, "RG11; Piece: 716; Folio: 101; Page: 4."
  6. [S422] National Probate Calendar, England & Wales (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966. (https://www.ancestry.co.uk/).
  7. [S422] National Probate Calendar, England & Wales (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966. (https://www.ancestry.co.uk/) Personal Estate: 85 pounds 2s 6d.

Walter Barber

b. 1878, d. 25 September 1880
FatherHerbert Wells Barber b. 20 Apr 1847, d. 16 Nov 1915
MotherSarah Postlethwaite b. 1 Apr 1849, d. 6 Aug 1917
     Walter Barber was born in 1878 at Cheshire, England. He was the son of Herbert Wells Barber and Sarah Postlethwaite.
Walter Barber died on 25 September 1880 at Bebington, Cheshire, England. 17 months old.
Walter Barber was buried after 25 September 1880 at Bebington Cemetery, Bebington, Cheshire, England.

Warren Barber

b. May 1953, d. 2011
FatherJames Laurence Barber b. 13 Oct 1923, d. 29 Sep 1959
MotherJaqueline Perry Waite b. Apr 1924, d. 3 May 1994
     Warren Barber was born in May 1953 at United States. She was the daughter of James Laurence Barber and Jaqueline Perry Waite.
Warren Barber died in 2011 at United States.