Mary Barber alias Nynne

b. 29 March 1598, d. 1633
FatherGeorge Barber alias Nynne b. c 1558, d. 1627
MotherElizabeth Godsell b. 21 Dec 1561, d. 1638
     Mary Barber alias Nynne was baptized on 29 March 1598 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England, surname recorded as Ninne.1 She was the daughter of George Barber alias Nynne and Elizabeth Godsell.
Mary Barber alias Nynne witnessed the will of Henry Aderoll alias Skinner dated 6 July 1612 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.2
Mary Barber alias Nynne witnessed the will of George Barber alias Nynne dated 18 January 1617 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.3
Mary Barber alias Nynne died in 1633 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
Mary Barber alias Nynne was buried on 14 December 1633 at St Denys, Rotherfield, Sussex, England, recorded as Barber alias Nunne.4
Admon: 1635: Appeared personally Mr. William Aweret, notary public and procurator for John Barber als Nyn natural and legitimate brother of Mary Barber als Nyn late of Retherfield deceased and renounced administration of the goods and chattels of the said deceased .5

Citations

  1. [S103] Transcript of the Parish Register of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, (ESRO: PAR 465/1/1/1).
  2. [S361] Will of Henry Aderoll alias Skynner of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 6 Jul 1612, proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 2 Nov 1613. (TNA: PROB 11/122/389).
  3. [S113] Will of George Nynne als Barber of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 18 Jan 1617, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 26 May 1627. (ESRO: PBT/1/1/20/40A).
  4. [S443] Rotherfield St Denys, Burials and MIs, undated, Rotherfield, Sussex (http://www.stdenysrotherfield.org.uk/familyhistory.htm).
  5. [S362] Letters of administration of the estate of Mary Barber of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, granted by the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 1635 (ESRO: W/B6/219).

Origins of Nynne Barber alias Nynne

      The Origins of the Surname NYNNE (in southern England at least)

The use of "Nynne" in the surname (and its many variant spellings) was first encountered in a marriage licence dated 1672 between Thomas "Barber alias Nin" and Mary Rootes, both of Tonbridge. As the focus of my research turned to Rotherfield in Sussex I discovered a number of generations of families with the "Barber alias Nynne" surname.
Although Barber, Nynne and Barber alias Nynne have been used interchangeably throughout the records, the trend has been for Nynne to predominate in the early 1500's, then Nynne alias Barber going into the 1600s and then just Barber after the move to Kent. Interestingly, my 12xg grandfather was recorded as "John Nynd" when he was appointed a churchwarden at the end of 1531 and then "John Barber" in the first entry for the churchwarden's accounts for 1532, and then John Nynde in the same accounts later that year. If I was to speculate I would say that it seems like he knew his real surname was Barber but everyone else referred to him as Nynne, at least in their early years in Rotherfield. Perhaps that is why Barber won out in the end. Unfortunately I have not been able to discover why two surnames were used, although it was not an uncommon practice for those times. One possibility is that he (or someone in an earlier generation) had a wife whose maiden name was Nynne and because her family had higher status he was called by that name. A possible connection based on this line of thought is discussed at the end of this section. It could also have been because he was a child from a previous marriage and was known by his mother's previous married name (his true patrilineal surname) as well as her subsequent married name. Or he may have been illegitimate in which case there is a chance that neither Barber nor Nynne is the true patrilineal name.

Origin of Surnames in England

Although this is a complex subject the following points provide some useful background:

1. Kennett (2012) explains that surnames started to develop in Western Europe from the 11th century onwards. It began with the nobility and then spread to the rest of society so that by the 15th century fixed hereditary names (i.e. surnames) were common although they did emerge in different areas at different times, some much later.
2. Redmonds et al (2011) states that before the Norman Conquest no one in England possessed surnames and that it began with the Baron's wanting to identify with their estates in Normandy or their new lands in England. By the year 1200 most knights in southern England had surnames but it took much longer in the north. By 1250 the fashion for surnames spread among the ordinary folk, especially in southern England and East Anglia. The period 1300-1350 was a particularly formative time and by the early 15th century few English families were without a (hereditary) surname, although some continued to evolve. Most surnames today go back no earlier that the 14th century.
3. The adoption of surnames was driven by the increasing use of written records during the 12th - 14th centuries and the need for a more precise means of identification for such purposes as to prove ownership of land and property for inheritance and to identify debtors and creditors of various feudal dues and taxes. According to Reaney (1997) it was a process that was, in general, driven more by officials than the individual, although the actual choice of a surname appears to have been made more by neighbours (as would a nickname) than by clerks. Eventually everyone came to accept that a surname was a normal requirement of society.
4. Of relevance to the Nynne surname is the work by Redmonds et al which show that uncommon surnames often have just one origin, suggesting a common ancestor.
The approach to the study of surnames has changed fundamentally in recent years due to the computerisation of historic surname data (e.g. census returns, hearth tax, subsidy rolls, church records, registrations of births, marriages and deaths), better analytical tools (geographical information systems) and cheaper DNA analysis. In the early 20th century the approach was based on finding the earliest occurrence of a particular surname and then looking for the meaning of the name through an understanding of old languages and place names. The availability of better tools now enables this work to be conducted in greater detail by identifying the geographical concentrations of a particular surname and then studying how it evolved by using individual family histories (genealogy) and DNA.1,2,3

The Use of an Alias

The use of an alias was very common and was used to connect the different names of a person in order to be more precise about their identity, especially in the written records. A person may acquire different names due to remarriage in the family, illegitimacy or for simply being given a name by others (e.g. a nickname). There are a number of situations which can give rise to the use of an alias. Some examples are:
1. A man marrying an heiress or socially superior woman and adopting her family's surname to gain advantage;
2. An illegitimate child might be known by two surnames - his mother's maiden name (under which he was born) and her married name (i.e. his step-father's name);
3. A person may want to clarify entitlement to property recorded in the manorial rolls under another name. His current surname may be different due to family re-marriage.
4. Two or more people with the same name in the village and other villagers giving them a nickname based on where they lived or even their appearance.
In all the above cases the use of an alias served to better identify that person. Its use diminished over time and became obsolete by the mid 19th century. By the 20th century it became associated with fraudulent activity (i.e. by people wanting to disguise their real identity) and had negative connotations. This was certainly not the case in earlier times.
It is not known when the Barber alias Nynne surname was first used but it was at least from 1530 in Rotherfield in Sussex. John was recorded as both John Nynne and John Barber between 1530-32 and as John Nynde when he was buried in 1548. His widow was buried as Joan Nynne alias Barber in 1577. His son John's children were baptised as Nynne but their children were baptised Nynne alias Barber and by 1640 the children are baptised just Barber. We can therefore make the following observations: firstly, that the use of the alias persisted for four generations while the family lived in Rotherfield suggesting it was important; secondly, that it was usually written "Nynne alias Barber" (i.e. Nynne first) in the 16th century; and thirdly, that Barber won out in the end. Could this suggest that his legal name was Barber but that he grew up in a Nynne household? This would occur if he was born illegitimate where the mother's maiden name was Barber and she subsequently married a Nynne, or if he was born as a result of his mother's first marriage to a Barber and who, upon being widowed, later married a Nynne. Another scenario would be that the mother's maiden name was Nynne and she married a Barber but they used both surnames because Nynne was better known or had higher status.
In 1672 the family had moved to Tonbridge, but it was still important for Thomas Barber to state his name as "Barber alias Nin" [sic] on his marriage licence, probably because he had inherited property in Rotherfield which was held under that name in the manorial records. The sale of his parent's cottage in Rotherfield village in 1677 is the last known instance of its use. Living in Tonbridge, Thomas used only the surname Barber on his children's baptisms and the surname Nynne never appears again.

The Surname Nynne

The surname Nynne is quite rare, particularly in Sussex, although it does appear to become more common in Kent as one goes back into early manorial records (13th-15th centuries) where the surnames "atte Nynne", "de la Nynne" and "Nynne" appear in various documents. It is even rarer in the combination "Nynne alias Barber" (or vice versa) as this is found in only two parishes in Sussex: Rotherfield (primarily) and nearby Ticehurst. I would suggest that anyone with this surname in Sussex is on the same family tree.
A starting point in determining the origin of a surname is to look at its distribution across Britain. This information is available for the 1881 census and the distribution map for the 32 occurrences of Nynne, Nynn, Ninn and Nin is shown here.
The map clearly shows the name to be rare, possibly even close to extinction, and probably a single origin surname. The highest concentration was in Ashford, Kent where there were 14 occurrences (all spelt Ninn). The next highest was 5 occurrences in Middlesbrough, North Yorkshire (all spelt Nynne) and 3 in Newcastle Upon Tyne (all spelt Nynn).
The author conducted a survey of the occurrence of the surname Nynne (and variants) in the on-line catalogue of documents held by The National Archives in England between c1250 and 1500 and found the name occurred mostly in the in the Kent parishes of Egerton and, in particular, Great Chart suggesting that this could be where the surname originated. Both of these parishes are within the Ashford area mentioned above.
The subsidy rolls (lists of taxpayers) provide valuable data for surname distribution studies although they do not include everyone, only the taxpayers. The Kent Lay Subsidy Roll of 1334/5 has only one occurrence of the Nynne surname and that is William atte Nynne in the Hundred of [Great] Chart who paid 4s/0¾d. This was a tax based on the value of moveable goods (one fifteenth for rural areas and one tenth for urban areas) with the poorest inhabitants exempt.4
One of the earliest occurrences of the name is in April 1259, also at Great Chart in Kent, where a Simon atte Nynne is one of a number of witnesses on a document concerning an annual payment made at the manorial court. The names of some of the other witnesses are interesting in the context of surname study: Thomas the smith, William of Upton, Henry son of Matthew, Benjamin the bedel. Some of these names may have evolved into hereditary surnames and others not. For example Thomas "the smith" may not have been a hereditary name at this stage and may simply be a descriptor reflecting his occupation, in which case the name "smith" would be termed a byname. It is only called a surname when it is shown to have become hereditary and passed from father to son. We can be sure though that "atte Nynne" was indeed a surname in 1259 as the name occurs thereafter in Great Chart and so had become hereditary. This would mean that Nynne became a surname fairly early and is therefore older than most which, according to Redmonds et al, only date back to the 14th century.5
Further investigation of the area around Great Chart reveals the likely connection to a local place name, Ninne House manor. The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent, Volume 7, by Edward Hasted published in 1798 mentions this manor in Great Chart:
NINNEHOUSE is a manor, situated on the northern side of the quarry-hill, not far from the river Stour, which was antiently [anciently] the residence of John at Nin, whose figure, in armour, was with those of other eminent men formerly in the north window of the north chancel of this church; in whose descendants it continued till the reign of Henry VI. when it was alienated to Sharpe; one of whom, William Sharpe, of this place, died possessed of it in 1499, and lies buried in the middle isle of this church, with his five wives, as does his descendant William Sharpe the elder, who died in 1583.
The location of Ninn(e) House is shown here.
A Ninn farm and Ninn Lane survive there today but unfortunately the lead light windows in the church are long gone, possibly removed during the time of Oliver Cromwell in the mid 1600's.
Following the publication of an article I wrote for the Sussex Family Historian a member of the Sussex Family History Group gave this explanation for the surname Nynne.6
The online A2A section of the National Archives holds all the clues you need to unlock the story of the name. You've already quoted one significant clue in your article - the name 'de la Nynne'. Nynne clearly falls into the group of surnames which derive from a place or specific location. If you search further in the above records you'll find that the name in Great Chart also appears as 'de la hinne', 'de la Inne' and 'atten Inne' in the mid to late 1200's. A reputable Middle English dictionary (or similar online info) will reveal that hinne, hin, ynne, ine and inne all meant the same thing in medieval times - a lodging house or rooms for guests (i.e. an inn). The word 'inn' also existed in Saxon times and has never changed. When 'atten' is placed in front of a locative name beginning with a vowel such as 'inne', you'll find that when spoken out loud the last letter of 'atten' transfers across. Try this yourself and see! Any words which were not in Latin were written down phonetically at this time, so the clerks wrote down exactly what they heard - which was ninne. This also happened to other locative words which became surnames, such as ash and oak. 'Atten' gradually became atte, resulting in the name 'atte Nynne' or 'atte Ninne', masking its original form entirely. The records in A2A chart every step of this interesting process. Only once the surname had become fixed and hereditary (this happened at different times in different areas) would 'de la' and 'atte' have been dropped, leaving just Nynne, Ninne, Nin, Nenne etc. Ninnehouse simply meant the inn house at Great Chart manor. You may know that Great Chart (owned by Christchurch Priory, Canterbury) was just one of numerous manors the priory held in Kent. There were others elsewhere. Inns became increasingly common in 12th and 13th century England and because manors were more important than villages, these would have been the location for the earliest inns. Ninnehouse would have been one of several farms on Great Chart manor and the one which specifically provided food and overnight accommodation for visitors, travellers and pilgrims and stabling for their horses. A John atte Nynne does appear in the archives, as a witness to a grant. You will find him in 1349 in the A2A records. Hasted's record (copied from elsewhere) saying that John was depicted in armour should be taken with a pinch of salt I think. There are no records of any knight with the name of Nynne or Ninne.
The surname Nynne would therefore be categorised as a locative surname being derived from a place-name. It is likely to be a single origin name (at least in southern England) meaning it would go back to just one ancestor who was the first to start using Nynne as a surname. Given its early occurrence as a surname (at least c1250) we could also speculate that the person of origin is more likely to be someone with a hereditary connection to the manor/farm rather than someone who just worked there, as otherwise the name would probably have been used just as a byname.
The surname Barber, on the other hand, is clearly an occupational, multi-origin surname and the Oxford "A Dictionary of English Surnames" (1997) states that the barber was formerly a regular practitioner in surgery and dentistry. This would have included bone setting, bloodletting and leeching, fire cupping, enemas, and the extraction of teeth; earning them the name "barber surgeons".
The surname Nynne has been spelt various ways (i.e. has many variants) - Nynne, Nyne, Ninne, Nynde, Nynder, Nynd, Nin, Ninn and Nyn with the most common spelling being Nynne prior to c1600. From 1700 onwards, the name is spelt Ninn in Kent. A list of Ninn births in England between 1950 and 2006 contains just nine names, eight in Kent and one in Sussex, highlighting the rarity of the name today. Interestingly, five of these are in Ashford, Kent which is adjacent to Great Chart, the likely ancestral home of the name.
The surname would have almost certainly been pronounced "Ninn". In Kent, the surname was most commonly spelt "Nynne" up to about c1600 and then "Ninn". This is just a peculiarity of spelling of those times, where "i" was usually replaced by "y" and often an "e" put on the end to confirm the pronunciation as "ninn" and not "nine" or "ninny".
At present it is not known where John and Joan, the first Barber alias Nynnes in Rotherfield, were born or married. They appear in the manorial records in 1530 and there is no mention of either Barber or Nynne before then. The burial of a Robert Nynder [sic] on 1 Nov 1548 in Rotherfield is of interest as although there is no information to place him in any family, he could be a son of John and Joan, or a brother of either, or even an uncle or father. This is potentially significant because of a relationship between a Robert Nynne and the Nevill(e) family in Kent. The Neville family became lords of Rotherfield manor as a consequence of a marriage in 1450 and it remains with them to this day. In 1542 Thomas Neville, brother of the then Lord Bergavenny (lord of Rotherfield manor) and a lawyer and Speaker of the House of Commons, died at Mereworth castle, Kent and his will leaves bequests to his servants among who is a Robert Nynne who also acted as an executor of the will. Robert Nynne also appears as a witness in the will of John Godden of nearby Ryarsh in 1546 and was described as a yeoman of Maidstone in 1537. It is possible that John and Joan were linked to the family of this Robert Nynne who obviously had significant status in the Neville family. This could explain why the surname Nynne was favoured in the 16th century in Rotherfield if, for example, a daughter of the Nynne family married a Barber.7,8,9

© Geoffrey Barber 2015.

Citations

  1. [S561] T. King & D. Hey G. Redmonds, "Surnames, DNA & Family History", Oxford University Press, First Edition (2011) unknown isbn "pp. 2,3, 56,57."
  2. [S562] P.H. Reaney (Revised R.M. Wilson), "A Dictionary of English Surnames", Oxford University Press, unknown edition (1997) "pp. xiv-xlvi."
  3. [S563] Debbie Kennett, "The Surnames Handbook", The History Press, First Edition (2012) unknown isbn.
  4. [S564] Ed. H.A. Hanley and C.W. Chalklin ed. "Kent Lay Subsidy Roll of 1334/35", Kent Archaeological Society, unknown edition (2008).
  5. [S565] Court books of the manor of Great Chart in Kent, England, April 1259 (CCA-DCc-ChAnt/C/322).
  6. [S566] S. Paskins ed. "Sussex Family Historian", Sussex Family History Group, Vol 20 No 3 (September 2012) "Vol. 20, No. 3, pp. 101-106."
  7. [S567] L.L. Duncan ed. "Medieval & Tudor Kent P.C.C. Wills", n.pub., unknown edition (unknown publish date) "Book 15, p. 551."
  8. [S568] Will of Sir Thomas Neville of Kent, England, made 23 May 1542, proved in the Prerogrative Court of Canterbury, 23 Oct 1542. (TNA: PROB 11/29, ff. 82-3).
  9. [S569] Will of John Godden of Ryarsh, Kent, England, made 26 Jul 1546, proved in the Consistory court of Rochester, 5 Oct 1546. (unknown document ref).

Publications Barber alias Nynne

     
History of the Old House, (Originally Marden’s Farm), in Hildenborough, Kent. (2014.)

Barber alias Nynne - Five Hundred Years of Family History in Rotherfield, Tonbridge and Brighton. (2015).
See main page on how to purchase this book.

George Meek's Grandfather. (2016.)

Great-Grandmother’s Secrets Revealed! (2015.)

Harriet Gladman's Embroidery (2017.)

The AKEHURST Wills of East Sussex 1541-1858 (2018.)

Richard Barber alias Nynne

b. circa 1540, d. 1603
FatherJohn Barber alias Nynne b. c 1500, d. 1548
MotherJoan (?) b. c 1500, d. 1577
     Richard Barber alias Nynne was born circa 1540 at England. He was the son of John Barber alias Nynne and Joan (?)
A baptism for Richard Nynne alias Barber has not been found. He first appears in Ticehurst on 25 Aug 1577 when his son Thomas is baptised. The connection to the Nynne alias Barber family in Rotherfield is highly likely, although it is pure speculation to identify his parents as John and Joan Nynne alias Barber. However, the name is so unique that there has to be a connection, and he has been placed here for convenience for now (GGB). The fact that he does not appear in the will of John Nynne alias Barber (c1530-1591) at Rotherfield would indicate that he is not his son but more likely to be his brother or cousin.
Richard Barber alias Nynne married Joan (?) circa 1575 at England.
Richard was obviously a respected member of the community in Ticehurst as he appears as a juror in a coroners' inquest on 3 Oct 1584 at Etchingham where the case concerned John Sovage of Ticehurst, who had hanged himself.1
Richard Barber alias Nynne died in 1603 at Ticehurst, Sussex, England.
Richard Barber alias Nynne was buried on 20 April 1603 at Ticehurst, Sussex, England, "Richard Nynn als Barber."2
His estate was probated on 5 May 1603 at Archdeaconry of Lewes, Sussex, England.3
5 May 1603 – admon of the goods of Richard Nyn late of Tiseherst, deceased, granted to Johanne, his relict, in the person of Robert Oteingham, notary public and procurator. Bonds William Nyn of Tiseherst, ‘paylemaker’, and Christopher Fowle of the same parish, husbandman, in £30. Inventory examined, value £15 15s 2d.
(East Sussex Record Office, XA 26/4.)
There are baptisms for two of Richard’s sons in the Ticehurst registers: Thomas (25 August 1577) and John (11 Oct 1584). Both were buried in 1584. The above grant of administration suggests that there is at least one surviving son, William, whose baptism has not been found. The burial entry for Richard's wife Joan on 24 May 1620 supports this by stating that she is "mother of William". There are also burials in Ticehurst of Silvester Barber alias Nynn on 20 November 1608 and Richard Barber alias Nynn on 19 March 1610 who could also be children of Richard and Joan.
Their son William married Elizabeth Fuller at Ticehurst on 21 August 1609 and the Ticehurst parish registers record the following baptisms of William's children: Susan (bap. 1611, bur. 1611), Ann (bap. 1615), Richard (bap. 1622, bur. 1631). The entry in the burial register for Richard in 1631 states that he is the son of William Barber alias Nynn and this is the last reference to the Nynn surname in Ticehurst. There is also a marriage in Ticehurst on 4 February 1638/39 of a Thomas Barber and Joan Primer and this Thomas is another son of William and Elizabeth (baptised at Burwash on 15 April 1610, "son of William Barber of Tishurst"). William was buried in Ticehurst on 13 January 1625 and the Barber surname does carry through the Ticehurst parish registers into the 1700’s.
Prior to the earliest Richard, the only Barber in Ticehurst is a Jhon (John) Barber, gent, and his wife Elizabeth who first get mentioned with the baptism of their son Wyllm (William) on 30 Aug 1562. Wyllm and Elizabeth are both buried in 1562. There are some Sussex Archaeological Society deeds relating to this family, and a brief inspection indicated that no males survived, that the name Nynne was never mentioned, that there were a number of daughters, and that a daughter Frances Barber was the main beneficiary.

Family

Joan (?) d. 1620
Marriage*
Richard Barber alias Nynne married Joan (?) circa 1575 at England
Children

Citations

  1. [S280] R F Hunnisett, "Sussex Coroners' Inquests 1558-1603", PRO Publications, First Edition (1996) "Inquest No 311, p70."
  2. [S25] Index to Sussex Burials, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.
  3. [S130] Letters of administration of the estate of Richard Nyn of Ticehurst, Sussex, England, granted by the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 5 May 1603 (ESRO: PBT 1/3/3/17F).

Richard Barber alias Nynne

b. circa 1581, d. 1610
FatherRichard Barber alias Nynne b. c 1540, d. 1603
MotherJoan (?) d. 1620
     Richard Barber alias Nynne was baptized circa 1581 at England. He was the son of Richard Barber alias Nynne and Joan (?)
Richard Barber alias Nynne died in 1610 at Ticehurst, Sussex, England.
Richard Barber alias Nynne was buried on 9 March 1610 at Ticehurst, Sussex, England.1

Citations

  1. [S25] Index to Sussex Burials, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.

Richard Barber alias Nynne

b. 8 September 1622, d. 1631
FatherWilliam Barber alias Nynne b. c 1580, d. 1625
MotherElizabeth Fuller d. 1625
     Richard Barber alias Nynne was baptized on 8 September 1622 at Ticehurst, Sussex, England.1 He was the son of William Barber alias Nynne and Elizabeth Fuller.
Richard Barber alias Nynne died in 1631 at Ticehurst, Sussex, England.
Richard Barber alias Nynne was buried on 8 February 1630/31 at Ticehurst, Sussex, England, "son of William als Nynn."2,3

Citations

  1. [S23] Index to Sussex Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.
  2. [S25] Index to Sussex Burials, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.
  3. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) "GS Film number: 001894292, Digital Folder Number: 004427686."

Susan Barber alias Nynne

b. 13 September 1611, d. October 1611
FatherWilliam Barber alias Nynne b. c 1580, d. 1625
MotherElizabeth Fuller d. 1625
     Susan Barber alias Nynne was baptized on 13 September 1611 at Ticehurst, Sussex, England.1 She was the daughter of William Barber alias Nynne and Elizabeth Fuller.
Susan Barber alias Nynne died in October 1611 at Ticehurst, Sussex, England.
Susan Barber alias Nynne was buried on 28 October 1611 at Ticehurst, Sussex, England, "Susan Barber."2

Citations

  1. [S23] Index to Sussex Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.
  2. [S25] Index to Sussex Burials, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.

Sylvester Barber alias Nynne

b. circa 1579, d. 1608
FatherRichard Barber alias Nynne b. c 1540, d. 1603
MotherJoan (?) d. 1620
     Sylvester Barber alias Nynne was baptized circa 1579 at England. She was the daughter of Richard Barber alias Nynne and Joan (?)
Sylvester Barber alias Nynne died in 1608 at Ticehurst, Sussex, England.
Sylvester Barber alias Nynne was buried on 20 November 1608 at Ticehurst, Sussex, England, "Sylvester Nynn als Barber."1

Citations

  1. [S25] Index to Sussex Burials, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.

Thomas Barber alias Nynne

b. 3 May 1640, d. 1683
FatherThomas Barber alias Nynne b. 1 Jan 1585, d. 1649
MotherAnne Latter b. 11 Dec 1608, d. c 1675
     Thomas Barber alias Nynne was born in 1640 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
Thomas Barber alias Nynne was baptized on 3 May 1640 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1 He was the son of Thomas Barber alias Nynne and Anne Latter.
Thomas's father died in May 1649 when he was only nine years old, and his mother was left a widow (again) to raise a young family.
Thomas Barber alias Nynne was a servant to Thomas Weller of Frant, Sussex on 7 January 1661/62.2
At some time between 1649 and 1662 Thomas's mother Ann Barber married Samuel Theobold. It is apparent from a lease document in Jan 1661/62 that her husband Thomas had foreseen this possibility and given her the right to hold all his properties by jointure and lease while she still lived, ensuring that she could provide for herself and her family in the event of his death, and also thus protecting his children’s inheritance in case Anne remarried (which she did). On 7 Jan 1661/62 at the age of 21 years, Thomas leased these properties from his mother and her third husband, Samuel Theobold, (i.e. the cottage in Rotherfield Town - this would be Bonnetts and Bachelands, and the 22 acres of land known as Drapers) and agreed to pay them a rent of £11/5s per year, with the term of the lease being for the life of Anne, his mother. This provided her with an annuity for the rest of her life. On Anne’s death the properties would pass to Thomas under the original jointure and lease agreement.
"7 Jan 1661/62 Lease by Samuel Theobold of Tonbridge, Kent, clothier and Ann his wife, to Thomas Barber alias Nine, of Frant, Sussex, then servant to Thomas Weller, gent., of a messuage or tenement, outhouse, barn and stall and a small piece of land lying near the said barn, together with all gardens, closes, backside, etc. in Rotherfield Town. Also, 4 pieces of land and wood containing 22 acres, called Drapyers in Rotherfield; all which premises the said Samuel held by right of An his wife made to her by jointure and lease from Thomas Barber alias Nine, her former husband, father of the above named Thomas. Term, the life of the said Ann Theobold party to the deed and mother of the said Thomas: rent yearly 11 pounds/5s. Signature of Samuel Theobold, and mark of Ann Theobold & seals. Witnesses: William Jeffrey, Ann Barber (mk)."
(Abstract by Sussex Archaeological Society.)2
Thomas Barber alias Nynne was a servant to Robert Stretfield of Westerham, Kent on 29 September 1663.
On 29 Sep 1663 Samuel Theobald, his wife Ann and her son Thomas Barber were grantors of a lease on Drapers for 21 years or the lives of the grantors at £7 p.a.
Counterpart lease for 21 years or the lives of the grantors from 29 Sep 1663 at £7
Date: 29 Nov 1663 (ESRO: AMS 6860/10/1)
Description: Samuel Theobald of Tonbridge in Kent, yeoman, and his wife Ann, and Thomas Barber of Westerham in Kent, servant to Robert Stretfield of Westerham, yeoman, to Richard Stretfield of Rotherfield, clothier
four pieces of arable and pasture with the shaws, coppices and underwoods (23 acres) called
Drapyers in Rotherfield, occupied by Richard Stretfield
reserved: timber and pollards of oak, ash and beech; lessee to pay the quitrent of 3s 8d; detailed husbandry covenants
Witnesses: Thomas Hosmer, William Stretfeild.

Ann and Samuel appear to have moved to Tonbridge around 1662 when they leased the Rotherfield properties to their son Thomas. In 1663 and 1670 Samuel is recorded as a yeoman of Tonbridge.
In 1662 Anne’s son Thomas was already living away from Rotherfield working in Frant as a servant to Thomas Weller, gent. We have evidence that Thomas Barber's uncle, John Barber, was also living in Frant in 1662 as the burial of his wife is recorded there: 20 Jun 1662 buried Mary, wife of John Barber, Retherfield. John was the only brother of Thomas's father and probably played a role in the upbringing of the young Thomas.
The subsequent lease of 1663 records Thomas as servant of Robert Stretfield of Westerham. It is not known where Thomas lived as Robert Stretfield had inherited properties at Crockham Hill at Westerham and at Penshurst (Hoadleyes) near Tonbridge.
By the time of his marriage in 1672 Thomas had also moved to Tonbridge and in 1677 he sold the family home (Bonnetts and Bachelands) in Rotherfield village. This was almost certainly following the death of his mother who had a life interest in the property. Apart from retaining the Drapers property the family had now cut their ties to Rotherfield with Thomas now a husbandman at Hilden (now called Hildenborough), a hamlet within the parish of Tonbridge and a few kilometres away from the town.
Thomas Barber's appearance at Hildenborough may be connected to his earlier employment with the Weller family. The Wellers were primarily a family of lawyers and connections to them start in 1635 when Thomas Weller witnessed the will of William Heath, the first husband of Thomas Barber’s mother, Ann. This is likely to be the same Thomas Weller who took her son into service, which could have happened around the time that Thomas Weller was appointed steward of the manor of Rotherfield in 1653.
Thomas Weller of Frant may be the same person who played an important role in the Civil War around Tonbridge 1642-46. He wrote his memoirs and later moved away from Tonbridge and died at Eridge Green (in Frant) in 1670 age 68 years. Weller’s death and the fact that his son lived in Tonbridge and was appointed under-steward of the Honor of Otford in 1671 (which included the manor of Datchurst alias Hilden near Tonbridge) may be connected with Thomas Barber's to move to Hilden, an event which probably occurred before his marriage 1672 when he states that he is "of Tonbridge" (Hilden is in the parish of Tonbridge). The connection to the Wellers appears to have continued and in 1691 we find Thomas Weller signing as under-steward for the manor of Datchurst (alias Hilden) when Mary Barber took possession of a cottage there.3,4,5,6
By 1672 Thomas was living in Tonbridge in Kent, and so began a period where the family lived there for the next 170 years, although they maintained a connection to Rotherfield through the ownership of the Drapers property.
Thomas Barber alias Nynne and Mary Rootes obtained a marriage licence on 11 October 1672 at Chevening, Kent, England.7 "11 Oct 1672 Thomas Barber alias Nin, of Tunbridge, Kent, Bachr, abt 30, & Mary Rootes, of the same, Spr, abt 25, at own disp; alleged by Edwd Clarke, of Cheevening, Kent, Dr of Divy; at Cheevening." There is a gap in the parish register for Chevening from June 1651 restarting in 1685. There are also no surviving Bishop's Transcripts so without this licence the marriage would have been lost.8
The marriage allegation shows that Edward Clarke of Chevening, Doctor of Divinity, appeared personally (it doesn't say where but presumably at the Vicar-General's office in London) and alleged that Thomas Barber als Nin of Tunbridge [sic] aged about 30 years and a bachelor intended to marry Mary Rootes of the same parish aged about 25 years and a spinster “at her owne dispose” (meaning that she did not have to gain anyone's permission to marry) and that he did not know or believe there was any impediment to hinder the intended marriage. He asked for a licence for the parties to be married in the parish church of Chevening. A licence enabled the couple to marry without the calling of banns in their home parishes (which is the announcing of the intended marriage on three Sundays prior to the marriage). It is interesting to see that Clarke obtained the marriage licence rather than either Thomas or Mary having to travel (presumably to London) to obtain it, but maybe he had gone to the Vicar General's office on some other business.
We could speculate that Thomas and Mary married in Chevening either because Mary had family in the parish or because of connections to the church. If the latter, perhaps Edward Clarke, Doctor of Divinity, was a personal friend or they approved more of his religious stance and preaching than the current incumbent of Tonbridge parish church. On the other hand it may have been simply because Edward Clarke was able to obtain a marriage licence and that this enabled them to be married with a greater degree of privacy and speed.
In 1677 there is a manorial record of the transfer of the Bonnetts and Bathelands properties from Thomas Nynne alias Barbour to Edmund Latter, likely a family relative of Thomas given that his mother's maiden name was also Latter. These are the properties in Rotherfield village that were leased to Thomas by his mother Anne in 1662 and first held by John Nynne in 1530. The transfer is almost certainly subsequent to the death of Anne, although no burial has been found for her. The document is transcribed below.
Retherfield Court Roll, 1677, Nynne alias Barber
Court Baron of William Dyke, Esquire, and Ralph Snowden, held in the same place for the tenants of the aforesaid manor on the sixth day of December in the 29th year of the reign of our Lord Charles the Second, by the grace of God, now King of England etc, and in the year of our Lord 1677, by Thomas Hoop [or Hooper], gentleman, steward.
Essoins: None
Homage: Nicholas Hosmer , Abraham Alchorne , Thomas Hosmer (sworn)
To this Court came Thomas Nynne alias Barbour and surrendered into the hands of the Lords, by the acceptance of their aforesaid steward, one messuage or tenement, one garden and one barn, called Bonnetts, and a certain way leading from the messuage to the aforesaid barn, and also one other garden containing one rood of land called Bathelands lying near the aforesaid barn, and one piece of meadow containing half an acre, and one wooden building, in English a lodge or hovel, and one garden previously Adam Fermor’s, situated and lying in Retherfeild, held by rent of [blank], heriot, relief and other services, to the use of Edmund Latter and his heirs, according to the custom of the aforesaid manor. And thereupon to this court came the aforesaid Edmund and sought that he be admitted to the messuage, tenement, barn, garden, lands and premises aforesaid, with the appurtenances, to whom the lords, through their aforesaid steward, granted seisin thereof by rod, to have and to hold to the same Edmund and his heirs, at the will of the lords, according to the custom of the aforesaid manor, by the rent and services formerly due in respect thereof and by right accustomed. And he gave to the lords, as fine and heriot, a composition, £3 13s 4d. And he is admitted as tenant thereof. And he has seisin by rod. And he makes fealty to the lords.9

Thomas Barber alias Nynne died in 1683 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.
Sadly, Thomas died just 11 years after his marriage leaving Mary with three young children. He must have known he was dying as his will was written just four days before his burial.
Thomas Barber alias Nynne left a will made on 28 October 1683 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.10
Thomas Barber alias Nynne was buried on 1 November 1683 at Tonbridge, Kent, England, aged 43 years with the entry stating that Thomas is "of Hilden". Hildenborough is now a suburb of Tonbridge.11
"In the name of God Amen the eigh and twentith of Octobar in 1683 I Thomas Barbar of tonbridg in the county of kent husbane man being at this present of sound and parfect minde and memory praysed bee God but sick and weake in body doe therfore make and ordayne this to be my last Testament and will In manner and forme following first and principallye I will and resigne my soule into the hands of God my maker hoping To have pardn for all my sins throe the merits deth and resurriktion of Jesus Christ my alon Redemar and my body I commit to the earth in such desent mannar to bee buried as mine Ex[ecutrix] hereaftar named shall thinke fite And as concerning that estate aswell reall as parsonall which god of his mercy hath lent me here on earth I orden will and dispose of as followith that is to say I will and giv unto mary my loving wif all my lands lying in Rearfel [Rotherfield] in the couty of sothsex known by the name of Dreapars or by any other name or names what so ever for term of har natarall life with libarty to sell the timbar now standing theron within the spas of thre years aftar my desis preserving the under wads [underwoods ?] and timbar that shall renew grow or incres theron derring har natarall life and aftar har deses for the yeus of my to sons Ricard Barbar and Thomas Barbar paying therout to Elizabeth Barbar my daftar the some of forty and fif poundes with in too years aftar my wifs deses the rest of my Goods and chatells watever to my wif toward bringing up of my thre children Richard Thomas and Elizabeth I likwis make and ordayn mary my wif soll exsecutar of this my testamint and last will and to pay my depts and fenarall charges wher unto I have set my hand and sill
The marke of Thomas Barbar
Aftar har disis and
To mary my wif was entalined
Befor the selling herof did
Selid and delevered befor
The mark of William Ousbun
The marke of John mepam
Richard Polhill
Decemb. 14 1683
[in Latin] the executrix of this testament made oath before me Joh: Stileman surrogate"
(Transcribed by Gillian Rickard for Geoffrey Barber, 2010.)
We know from his will that Thomas was a 'husbane man', or husbandman, which would generally be understood to mean that he was a tenant farmer who cultivated rented or leased land (as opposed to a yeoman farmer who cultivated his own land). While there was a distinction between yeomen and husbandmen, the variability in wealth and size of yeoman landholdings meant that it was often hard to distinguish between the wealthier husbandmen and the poorer yeomen. Lawrence Biddle’s book “Leigh in Kent 1550 to 1900” makes comment on the prosperity and wealth of the tenant farmers in the nearby village of Leigh indicating that these were not poor people. Also, many tenant farmers owned property as well, just as Thomas owned Drapers in Rotherfield, making it difficult to generalise. It is worth noting that Drapers must have become quite a valuable property to be able to bear raising the sum of £45 against it to be given to daughter Elizabeth as her share of her father's estate.
However, although the will tells us that Thomas was a husbandman and that he and Mary lived in Hildenborough, there is no evidence of them occupying land or farming there. We do know that Thomas sold the house in Rotherfield village in 1677 (he would have had to wait until the death of his mother) and would therefore have had money to become reasonably well established in Hildenborough, especially if he was just leasing the land rather than owning it. However, a search of the Tonbridge Overseers of the Poor rating assessments from 1670 to 1692 shows no entries for Barber. This is not what would be expected if Thomas leased property for farming, suggesting that he may have worked on one of the larger estates, perhaps the Datchurst manor, and that this could have been as an extension of his employment with the Weller family in Frant as Thomas Weller did become an under-steward at Datchurst in 1671 and the first evidence of Thomas Barber living in Tonbridge parish is his marriage in 1672.
Thomas’s move to Tonbridge/Hildenborough would ultimately prove to be a wise one. His move coincided with the start of a social transformation in Tonbridge brought about by the auction of four of Tonbridge’s manorial estates from the end of the 17th century through to the early 18th century which enabled the farmers, freeholders, yeoman and merchants to purchase land and over several generations acquire significant properties. Families such as the Wellers, Hoopers, Woodgates and the Childrens all benefitted, increasing their wealth and social status. This flowed through to other levels of society, allowing former tenants and copyholders to become independent farmers and also to purchase property in the town. All were to benefit also from the prosperity that came when the River Medway was made navigable to Tonbridge in 1741. Although the Barbers were not of the same social status as the Wellers and the Childrens, they rode the wave of prosperity and eventually became owners of a number of Tonbridge properties.12,13,6,14
His estate was probated on 14 December 1683 at Prerogative Court of Canterbury, London, England.10

Family

Mary Rootes b. c 1647, d. 1732
Marriage License*
Thomas Barber alias Nynne and Mary Rootes obtained a marriage licence on 11 October 1672 at Chevening, Kent, England.7 
Children

Citations

  1. [S23] Index to Sussex Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.
  2. [S117] Transcription of Theobold/Barber alias Nine Lease, 7 Jan 1661/2. (ESRO SAS FA 781).
  3. [S162] Frank Chapman, "The Book of Tonbridge", Barracuda Books Limited, First Edition (1976) ""Tom Weller's War" pp 55-57."
  4. [S437] J.J. Howard ed. "Miscellanea Genealogica et Heraldica, Vol II, New Series", Hamilton, Adams, and Co., First Edition (1876).
  5. [S535] Appointment by Jn., Lord Bergevenny, of Thos. Weller, gent. of Tonbridge, Kent, as Steward of Manors of Birling, Ryarsh, Luddesdown, & Teperedge, Kent, & Manors of Rotherfield, Eridge, Bullocketown, & Roughhedges, Sussex. Signed by Lord Bergevenny, with shapeless seal attached, 6 Apr 1653. (TNA: HA 519/89/65).
  6. [S536] Appointment by Robt., Earl of Leicester, of Thos. Weller, gent. of Tunbridge, Kent, as Understeward of Honor of Otford. Manors of Penshurst Halemote, Hundred of Somerden with Kingsborough & Halborough, & Manor of Datchurst & Hildenborough. Signed by Earl of Leicester, 26 Sep 1671. (TNA: HA 519/96/66).
  7. [S127] Unknown editor ed. "Harleian Society: Allegations for Marriage Licences Issued By The Vicar: General of The Archbishop of Canterbury, 1669 To 1679. Volume 34", The Harleian Society, First Edition (1892).
  8. [S132] Transcript of the Parish Register of Chevening, Kent, England, (KHLC: PAR 88/1/1/1).
  9. [S107] CourtRolls of the manor of Rotherfield, 1631-1753 (ESRO: ABE 74O1) pg 252, 6 Dec 1677, Nynne alias Barber.
  10. [S3] Will of Thomas Barber of Tonbridge, Kent, England, made 28 Oct 1683, proved in the Archdeaconry of Rochester, 14 Dec 1683. (KHLC: DRa/PW4).
  11. [S133] Transcript of the Parish Register of Tonbridge, Kent, England, 1547-1730 (KHLC: TR 2451/20).
  12. [S163] Lawrence Biddle, "Leigh in Kent 1550 to 1900", Lawrence Biddle, First Edition (1991) "p27."
  13. [S126] Tonbridge Overseers of the Poor Rating Assessments, 1670-. (KHLC: P371/12/1-4).
  14. [S472] C.W. Chalklin ed. "Georgian Tonbridge", Tonbridge Historical Society, First Edition (1994) "Chapter: The Landed and Propertied Classes of Georgian Tonbridge by Dr P.L. Humphries."

Thomas Barber alias Nynne

b. 1 January 1585, d. 1649
FatherGeorge Barber alias Nynne b. c 1558, d. 1627
MotherElizabeth Godsell b. 21 Dec 1561, d. 1638
Thomas Nynne alias Barber - churchwarden at Rotherfield, 1638.
     Thomas Barber alias Nynne was born in 1585 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
Thomas Barber alias Nynne was baptized on 1 January 1585 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England, as Thomas Nynne son of George Nynne alias Barber.1 He was the son of George Barber alias Nynne and Elizabeth Godsell.
Thomas Barber alias Nynne witnessed the will of Henry Aderoll alias Skinner dated 6 July 1612 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.2
Title: Lease for 21 years at £12 a year from Rt Hon Henry Lord Bergevenny and Thomas Nevill, son and heir apparent, to John Weller of Rotherfield, yeoman, and Thomas Weller of Cliffords Inn, London, gent
Date: 24 Apr 1627 (ESRO: SAS/HC 541)
Description: 6 pieces called Bearefeilds of 40 acres in Rotherfield, in occupation of Thomas Poter, gent, Adam Farmer and Thomas Barber.
Thomas Barber alias Nynne witnessed the will of George Barber alias Nynne dated 18 January 1617 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.3
Thomas Barber alias Nynne was a yeoman (ESRO: SAS/CO 4/19) on 30 May 1627.
Title: Settlement (covenant to stand seised)
Date: 30 May 1627. (ESRO: SAS/CO 4/19)
Description: Between William Chowne of Rotherfield, yeoman, to Thomas Markwick of Rotherfield, butcher and Thomas Barber of Rotherfield, yeoman, in trust for WC for life, remainder to Thomas Catt and his wife Margery Catt (WC's sister), remainder to their son Thomas Catt the younger
a messuage, barn, close, two garden plots and orchard in Rotherfield Town occupied by Thomas Catt (E: a messuage of Anthony Fowles, esquire; S: high street; W: messuage of TB; N: lands of TB and of John Aderoll)
Witnesses: William Thomas, Thomas Weller.

He inherited the family properties at the age of 42 years following the death of his father, George, in 1627. We find this documented in the manorial court books:
24 Jul 1627: Steward: Tho Houghton, gt. Copy Admission of Tho Nynne als Barber, on death of his father Geo. Heriot: 1 Ox "color red branded". Unspecified land.4
One of the important tasks of the manorial court was to record the death of tenants in the court books, the name of their heir, and the name and description of their lands. The heir is thus "admitted" to the land. This entry also shows one of the interesting customs of the manor whereby upon the death of a tenant, the lord of the manor shall have his best animal in the name of a heriot (a feudal due). We would call it a death tax today! The heriot arose from an old custom whereby all men were bound to make a return on death of the “hergeat”, or war gear (horse, harness, weapons), which the lord had originally supplied and it was therefore right that he should resume possession on the man’s death. However, this concept became corrupted over time and evolved into yet another means of taxing the people.5
There is a later entry for the cottage known as Bonnetts and associated land called Bachelands: 11 Oct 1627: Steward: Tho Houghton, gt. Admission of Tho Nynne als Barber, eldest son of Geo N.als B., on his father's death. Mes & gdn at Retherfield Hill, of 1 rod, & a barn called Bonnetts, with a Way from sd mes to the barn; Also a gdn of 1 rod called Bacheland next to sd barn; Also a pcl meadow of 1/2 ac, a Kitchen (coquinam) once of Alice Adowne, & a gdn once of Adam Farmer. The Latin word "coquinam" is in the original document meaning "pertaining to cooks/cooking", which has been translated in this context to mean kitchen.6
Title: Lease of Bearefeilds for £10 for lives at £12 a year from Henry Lord Bergevenny to John Weller of Rotherfield, yeoman, and brother Thomas Weller
Date: 10 Aug 1629. (ESRO: SAS/HC 544)
Description: premises as in SAS/HC 541, now described as 24 acres in occupation of Adam Farmer, Thomas Barber and Arthur Catt; term: for the longest life of John Weller, Thomas Weller and their brother Stephen Weller;
witnesses to deed: Abraham Newport, John Marshalshay; to livery of seisin: Edmund Latter, William Allen.

As a free tenant, Thomas had responsibilities to the manor. In 1628 he was a surety for Southborough and at various times between 1631 and 1633 served as one of the jury in the manorial court. The sworn jury decided on the fines payable for offenses, appointed the officers of the manor and heard the cases against miscreant tenants. He is no longer mentioned in the court books after 1635 although he appears again as a witness in 1648.7
Title: Lease for lives of Bearefeilds at £12 a year from Henry Lord Bergevenny to Thomas Weller the elder of Rotherfield, gent, and wife Elizabeth
Date: 20 Nov 1633. (ESRO: SAS/HC 549)
Description: premises described in SAS/HC 541; in occupation of John Latter, Thomas Barber and Adam Farmer; term: longest life of Thomas and Elizabeth and son Thomas Weller the younger;
witnesses to livery of seisin: Thomas Barton, attorney of Lord Bergevenny, Nicholas Wheler, Adam Austen, Margaret Barton (mark.)

On 14 May 1637, Thomas Barber alias Nynne was appointed a churchwarden at Rotherfield St Denys.8,9
Thomas Barber alias Nynne witnessed the will of Elizabeth Godsell dated 12 September 1637 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.10
Thomas Barber alias Nynne and Anne Latter obtained a marriage licence on 26 February 1639.11 Thomas Barber's mother Elizabeth was buried on 31 October 1638 and four months later, on 26 February 1639, Thomas and the widow Anne Heath (nee Latter) obtained a marriage licence. He was 54 years of age and Anne was a widow aged 30 years. The marriage licence reads: "Thomas Barber alias Nyn of Rotherfield, yeoman, & Anne Heath of same, widow, sureties: said T.B. alias N. and William Bowden of same, yeoman (Frant)". The witness William Bowden is a person of interest as the will of Elizabeth Nynne als Barber 1637 states her daughter's name as Elizabeth Bowden and so it is likely that William is her husband and therefore Thomas' brother-in-law. This is confirmation that this is the marriage of Thomas, son of George and Elizabeth Barber alias Nynne.
Thomas Barber alias Nynne married Anne Latter, daughter of Edmund Latter and Agnes A'Downe, on 7 March 1639 at Frant, Sussex, England, The church register simply states: Thomas Barber of Rotherfield & Anne Heath (widdow).12
Anne's previous husband, William Heath,had died in 1635 and at the time she married Thomas she had three young children: Edmond 8 years, Elizabeth 5 years and Robert 4 years. It has proved difficult to trace these children, although the baptism of Thomas Heath on 27 January 1673 at Tonbridge, son of Robert Heath (mother not named), may show that at least Robert survived and followed his mother to Tonbridge. This may also be the Robert Heath who married Dorothy Latter (his mother’s maiden name!) on 24 October 1668 in Horsmonden.13
It is interesting that Thomas did not marry until 4 months after Elizabeth’s death suggesting that she had played a major role in the household. An unmarried son inheriting such a house/cottage would be very much in need of a woman to run it which may explain why Thomas, a 54 year old, was quick to marry a 30 year old widow after his mother died. These were times when love was not necessarily the main factor in a marriage! Also, three years after Elizabeth’s death, Thomas’ unmarried sister Frances at age 52 years was moved to marry Abednego Breade, a widower, on 11 Mar 1640/41 at Rotherfield! Elizabeth's death certainly caused a major upheaval in the family.
The following shows the close relationship between Thomas Barber and the Latter family:
Title: Grant (indented) for 98
Date: 5 Sep 1639. (ESRO: SAS/AB/401)
Description: Stephen Baker to John Latter messuage in town of Rotherfield, with barns, buildings, closes, gardens, etc, belonging (S: High Street; W: messuage and garden of Nicholas Fowle, gent; N and E: messuage and lands of Thomas Barber) in tenure of Thomas Latter (one acre) the messuage formerly of Nicholas Alchorne and conveyed by him to Jane Fowle, and by Jane Fowle to John Baker, and by John Baker to Stephen Baker.
The records for the “Relief of Irish Protestants 1642 – East Sussex Contributors” show two Thomas Barber’s in Rotherfield:
Thomas Barber 1s
Thomas Barber 2d
John Barber 1d
The second Thomas Barber is most likely baptised at Burwash on 15 Apr 1610 "son of William Barber of Tishurst" and who married Johan (Joan) Primer at Ticehurst on 4 Feb 1638 and was buried in Rotherfield on 10 Apr 1663. The likely parents of this Thomas Barber are William Barber and Elizabeth Fuller who were married in Ticehurst on 21 Aug 1609. William Barber is a descendant of the Richard Nynne alias Barber of Ticehurst.14,15
Thomas Barber alias Nynne died in 1649 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
Thomas Barber alias Nynne was buried on 21 May 1649 at St Denys, Rotherfield, Sussex, England, aged 64 years.1
Thirty years later, on 19 July 1679, the churchwardens' accounts note the sale of a seat in the church by Edmund Latter to John Cheeseman the Elder, noting that the seat was previously owned by "Thomas Barbar". Edmund would likely have obtained the seat from Thomas’ widow, Anne (nee Latter), who was probably his sister.16,17

Family

Anne Latter b. 11 Dec 1608, d. c 1675
Marriage License
Thomas Barber alias Nynne and Anne Latter obtained a marriage licence on 26 February 1639.11 
Marriage*
Thomas Barber alias Nynne married Anne Latter, daughter of Edmund Latter and Agnes A'Downe, on 7 March 1639 at Frant, Sussex, England, The church register simply states: Thomas Barber of Rotherfield & Anne Heath (widdow).12  
Children

Citations

  1. [S103] Transcript of the Parish Register of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, (ESRO: PAR 465/1/1/1).
  2. [S361] Will of Henry Aderoll alias Skynner of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 6 Jul 1612, proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 2 Nov 1613. (TNA: PROB 11/122/389).
  3. [S113] Will of George Nynne als Barber of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 18 Jan 1617, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 26 May 1627. (ESRO: PBT/1/1/20/40A).
  4. [S120] Transcription of Thomas Nynne als Barber Admission, 24 Jul 1627. (ESRO SAS AB 397).
  5. [S138] H.S. Bennett, "Life on the English Manor 1150-1400", Cambridge University Press, First Edition (1937) "pages 143,144."
  6. [S121] Transcription of Thomas Nynne als Barber Admission, 11 Oct 1627. (ESRO: SAS AB 398).
  7. [S107] CourtRolls of the manor of Rotherfield, 1631-1753 (ESRO: ABE 74O1).
  8. [S104] Catharine Pullein, "Rotherfield: The Story of Some Wealden Manors", Courier, First Edition (1928) "page 225."
  9. [S108] Churchwardens' account book for Rotherfield, 1510-1675. (ESRO: PAR 465/10/3/1) page 101.
  10. [S114] Will of Elizabeth Nyne als Barber of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 12 Sep 1637, proved in the Archdeaconry Court at Lewes, 3 Dec 1638. (ESRO: PBT/1/1/25/189).
  11. [S115] Edwin H W Dunkin ed. "Sussex Record Society Vol 1: Calendar of Sussex Marriage Licences: Archdeaconry of Lewes 1586-1643", Sussex Record Society, First Edition (1901).
  12. [S122] Transcript of the Parish Register of Frant, Sussex, England, 1544-1881 (ESRO: PAR 344/1).
  13. [S125] Will of William Heath of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 4 Aug 1635, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 28 Apr 1636. (ESRO: PBT/1/1/24/84B).
  14. [S109] Transcript of the Parish Register of Burwash, Sussex, England, (ESRO: PAR 285/1).
  15. [S110] M J Burchall ed. "East Sussex Contributors to the relief of Irish Protestants 1642", Sussex Genealogical Centre, Occasional Paper No 10, First Edition (1984).
  16. [S108] Churchwardens' account book for Rotherfield, 1510-1675. (ESRO: PAR 465/10/3/1) page 118.
  17. [S104] Catharine Pullein, "Rotherfield: The Story of Some Wealden Manors", Courier, First Edition (1928) "page 252."

Thomas Barber alias Nynne

b. 30 July 1542
FatherJohn Barber alias Nynne b. c 1500, d. 1548
MotherJoan (?) b. c 1500, d. 1577
     Thomas Barber alias Nynne was baptized on 30 July 1542 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England, surname recorded as NYND.1 He was the son of John Barber alias Nynne and Joan (?)
Thomas Barber alias Nynne witnessed the will of John Barber alias Nynne dated 10 April 1589 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.2

Citations

  1. [S103] Transcript of the Parish Register of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, (ESRO: PAR 465/1/1/1).
  2. [S112] Will of John Barber als Nynne of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 10 Apr 1589, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 25 May 1591. (ESRO: PBT 1/1/8/423D).

Thomas Barber alias Nynne

b. 25 August 1577, d. 1584
FatherRichard Barber alias Nynne b. c 1540, d. 1603
MotherJoan (?) d. 1620
     Thomas Barber alias Nynne was baptized on 25 August 1577 at Ticehurst, Sussex, England.1 He was the son of Richard Barber alias Nynne and Joan (?)
Thomas Barber alias Nynne died in 1584 at Ticehurst, Sussex, England.
Thomas Barber alias Nynne was buried on 19 May 1584 at Ticehurst, Sussex, England, "Thomas William Nyne, son of Richard."2

Citations

  1. [S23] Index to Sussex Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.
  2. [S25] Index to Sussex Burials, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.

Thomas Barber alias Nynne

b. 15 April 1610, d. 1663
FatherWilliam Barber alias Nynne b. c 1580, d. 1625
MotherElizabeth Fuller d. 1625
     Thomas Barber alias Nynne was born in 1610 at Burwash, Sussex, England.
Thomas Barber alias Nynne was baptized on 15 April 1610 at Burwash, Sussex, England, Abode: Ticehurst.1 He was the son of William Barber alias Nynne and Elizabeth Fuller.
Thomas Barber alias Nynne was a servant of Zabulon Newington of Ticehurst according to Zabulon's will of 1635. The burial of Zabulon's father Joseph Newington in 1621 states that he is "of Withrenden" which is the Newington family property and where Thomas must have been living and working with the Newington family. Witherenden lies half way between Ticehurst and Burwash, explaining why baptisms are found in both places. Thomas's parents were both dead by the time he was 15 years old. It is likely that he served the Newingtons from an early age and grew up as part of their household. in 1635.2,3
Thomas Barber alias Nynne witnessed the will of Zabulon Newington dated 26 April 1635 at Ticehurst, Sussex, England.2
In 1635 Thomas received 40 shillings from the will of Zabulon Newington. A witness to the will was John Primer, most likely to be the father of Joan Primer who Thomas married four years later.
Thomas Barber alias Nynne married Joan Primmer, daughter of John Primmer and Joan Austen, on 4 February 1638/39 at Ticehurst, Sussex, England.
Thomas and Joan married just as the English Civil War (1642-1660) was about to start. The Burwash parish register records the birth of their first child Mary in 1639 but there is then no record of other children until 1652 in the Ticehurst parish register. They would certainly have had children in this period which is notorious for missing or poorly kept parish records. In particular, there is a William Barber who married Deborah Manser at Ticehurst in 1672 who is almost certainly a son of Thomas for the following reasons:
1. Thomas is likely to have named his first son William after his father.
2. When William married he is noted as "of Ticehurst" and Deborah is "of Burwash".
3. Thomas was employed as a servant of Zebulon Newington who is known to have connections to Burwash (some of his children were baptised there). The Newington family property, Witherenden, lies midway between the villages of Ticehurst and Burwash.
4. Thomas himself was baptised at Burwash, suggesting perhaps that his father William may have also worked for Zebulon Newington.
William Barber's connections to Ticehurst and Burwash, stated on his marriage record, would suggest that he is likely the son of Thomas Barber alias Nynne of Ticehurst.2
The 1642 records for the “Relief of Irish Protestants – East Sussex Contributors” show two Thomas Barber’s in Rotherfield:
Thomas Barber 1s
Thomas Barber 2d
John Barber 1d
The second Thomas Barber is most likely the son of William Barber and Elizabeth Fuller of Ticehurst (perhaps he moved from Withrenden after his marriage in 1639). The first Thomas Barber (and the John Barber) are most likely the sons of George and Elizabeth Barber alias Nynne of Rotherfield.4
Thomas Barber alias Nynne died in 1663 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
Thomas Barber alias Nynne was buried on 10 April 1663 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.5

Family

Joan Primmer b. 3 Mar 1615/16, d. 1699
Marriage*
Thomas Barber alias Nynne married Joan Primmer, daughter of John Primmer and Joan Austen, on 4 February 1638/39 at Ticehurst, Sussex, England
Children

Citations

  1. [S23] Index to Sussex Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.
  2. [S752] Will of Zabulon Newington of Ticehurst, Sussex, England, made 26 Apr 1635, proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 4 Jun 1635. (TNA: PROB 11/168/193).
  3. [S374] Website "British Listed Buildings" (http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/) "https://britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/…."
  4. [S110] M J Burchall ed. "East Sussex Contributors to the relief of Irish Protestants 1642", Sussex Genealogical Centre, Occasional Paper No 10, First Edition (1984).
  5. [S25] Index to Sussex Burials, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.

William Barber alias Nynne

b. circa 1570, d. 1629
FatherJohn Barber alias Nynne b. c 1530, d. 1591
MotherAlice Farmer b. c 1530, d. 1595
     William Barber alias Nynne was born circa 1570. He was the son of John Barber alias Nynne and Alice Farmer.
William Barber alias Nynne witnessed the will of John Barber alias Nynne dated 10 April 1589 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1
William is recorded as being a minor when probate is granted on his father John Barber alias Nynne's will.
William Barber alias Nynne witnessed the will of Margaret Scot dated 12 March 1591/92 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.2
William Barber alias Nynne witnessed the will of Henry Aderoll alias Skinner dated 6 July 1612 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.3
William Barber alias Nynne witnessed the will of George Barber alias Nynne dated 18 January 1617 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.4
William Barber alias Nynne died in 1629 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
William Barber alias Nynne was buried on 30 July 1629 at St Denys, Rotherfield, Sussex, England, "Barber als Nynne."5

Citations

  1. [S112] Will of John Barber als Nynne of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 10 Apr 1589, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 25 May 1591. (ESRO: PBT 1/1/8/423D).
  2. [S660] Will of Margaret Farmer of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 12 Mar 1591/92, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 15 Oct 1593. (ESRO: PBT 1/1/9/219A).
  3. [S361] Will of Henry Aderoll alias Skynner of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 6 Jul 1612, proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 2 Nov 1613. (TNA: PROB 11/122/389).
  4. [S113] Will of George Nynne als Barber of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 18 Jan 1617, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 26 May 1627. (ESRO: PBT/1/1/20/40A).
  5. [S443] Rotherfield St Denys, Burials and MIs, undated, Rotherfield, Sussex (http://www.stdenysrotherfield.org.uk/familyhistory.htm).

William Barber alias Nynne

b. circa 1535, d. 1548
FatherJohn Barber alias Nynne b. c 1500, d. 1548
MotherJoan (?) b. c 1500, d. 1577
     William Barber alias Nynne was born circa 1535 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England. He was the son of John Barber alias Nynne and Joan (?)
William Barber alias Nynne died in 1548 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
William Barber alias Nynne was buried on 1 March 1548 at St Denys, Rotherfield, Sussex, England, "son of John Nynde."1,2

Citations

  1. [S103] Transcript of the Parish Register of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, (ESRO: PAR 465/1/1/1).
  2. [S443] Rotherfield St Denys, Burials and MIs, undated, Rotherfield, Sussex (http://www.stdenysrotherfield.org.uk/familyhistory.htm).

William Barber alias Nynne

b. circa 1580, d. 1625
FatherRichard Barber alias Nynne b. c 1540, d. 1603
MotherJoan (?) d. 1620
     William Barber alias Nynne was baptized circa 1580 at England. He was the son of Richard Barber alias Nynne and Joan (?)
William Barber alias Nynne witnessed the probate of the estate of Richard Barber alias Nynne on 5 May 1603 at Archdeaconry of Lewes, Sussex, England.1
William Barber alias Nynne married Elizabeth Fuller on 21 August 1609 at Ticehurst, Sussex, England.
William may have worked for the Newington family whose family property was Witherenden which lies half way between Ticehurst and Burwash (see notes for his son Thomas).
William Barber alias Nynne died in 1625 at Ticehurst, Sussex, England.
William Barber alias Nynne was buried on 13 January 1625 at Ticehurst, Sussex, England, "William Barber."2
There is a marriage in Ticehurst of a William Barber and Mary Bate (dau. of Thos) on 29 Sep 1653 which would seem to imply that William and Elizabeth may have had a son William whose baptism has been lost or is not recorded.
There are four baptisms in Ticehurst 1656-1664 to a William Barber (wife not recorded but probably Mary):
15 Feb 1656 William Barber son of William, at Ticehurst
3 Mar 1660 Abraham Barbar son of William, at Ticehurst
30 May 1663 John Barber son of William, at Ticehurst.
26 Feb 1664 Margarett Barber (no parents given) at Ticehurst
(There is a William Barber burial in Ticehurst 8 Mar 1667/68 which is thought to be for the same William.)3

Family

Elizabeth Fuller d. 1625
Marriage*
William Barber alias Nynne married Elizabeth Fuller on 21 August 1609 at Ticehurst, Sussex, England
Children

Citations

  1. [S130] Letters of administration of the estate of Richard Nyn of Ticehurst, Sussex, England, granted by the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 5 May 1603 (ESRO: PBT 1/3/3/17F).
  2. [S25] Index to Sussex Burials, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.
  3. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/).

Woodside Cottage Barber alias Nynne

      Mary Barber purchased this property in 1691 and its location was only determined by following the ownership changes in the Datchurst manorial court books through to the late 19th century. Identifying the owner in the 19th century allowed that person to be located on the schedule attached to the 1838 Tonbridge tithe map, which gives the unique plot number (652) for the property and allows it to be located on the tithe map. The property is on the Tonbridge to Sevenoaks road, directly opposite the Half Moon Inn, and was originally just over one acre in area. Only the house survives today at 99 Tonbridge Road, Hildenborough and is a Grade II listed building now known as Woodside Cottage. There is a photograph of the house taken in 1957 in the English Heritage “England’s Places” photographic collection showing the house in a very overgrown and neglected state. Another photograph would appear to have been taken soon after when a certain amount of the overgrowth had been removed.
The house has since been restored and updated. It can be located at coordinates latitude 51.215118 North; longitude 0.243968 East.
Much of the information comes from the U55 collection at the Kent History and Library Centre of which the court rolls of the manor of Datchurst 1718-1884 (U55 M378) is one item. This collection came from Hubert. W. Knocker, solicitor and at one time steward of the manor of Datchurst (c1880), and includes a number of different manorial records, deeds etc. He looks to have been involved with a number of manors and kept the court records in his own possession which is fortunate, as with numerous changes of ownership (of the manors) and the vicissitudes of time, these records have often gone missing. (G. Rickard.)

HISTORY TIMELINE FOR THE WIDOW MARY BARBER'S PROPERTY, HILDENBOROUGH
(Note: taken from the book Barber alias Nynne - see Publications. Sources of information are given in the book).

21 Oct 1691     Widow Barber takes (copyhold) possession of a cottage from the manor of Datchurst. It is described as "One tenement or cottage, one barn and one orchard, and two roods of land by estimation, with the appurtenances, lying on the highway leading between Tonbridge and Sevenoaks towards the east and north, and the lands late of Francis Skeffington esquire towards the south". (See full transcription below).
Mar - Jun 1692     Three receipts for work done by William Dudson specifically mention Widow Barber and the "old house". The receipt mentions the building of a 4 flue chimney. (See transcription below).
14 Apr 1692     First occurrence of Widow Barber in the Overseers of the Poor rating assessments of property owners. The property was rated at 1s/6d indicating a rental value of the property of £1/10s (rated at 1s/- in the £).
17 Oct 1692     The property was rated at 2s/3d in the Overseers of the Poor rating assessment (rated at 1s/6d in the £), indicating a rental value of £1/10s as before.
16 Apr 1695     The property was rated at 1s/6d in the Overseers of the Poor rating assessment (rated at 1s/6d in the £), indicating a lower rental of £1. In addition there was "and for Mr Danver's 2s/3d" indicating that she had leased other lands.
7 Nov 1695     The property was rated at 1s/- in the Overseers of the Poor rating assessment (rated at 1s/- in the £), indicating a rental value of £1. Widow Barber is also rated for "Mr. Danver's & Mr. Richardson's, 1s/6d".
9 June 1698     The property was rated at 2s/- in the Overseers of the Poor rating assessment (rated at 2s/- in the £), indicating a rental value of £1. Mr Danvers and Mr Richardson are rated for "land late used by Widowe Barber", so she is no longer using this.
4 Oct 1712     A quit rent receipt for 6d paid by Mary Barber states "for lands near the Half Moon".
13 Oct 1730     Two years before she dies, Widow Mary Barber transfers the property to her eldest surviving son, Thomas Barber, a malster of Tonbridge. (See transcription below).
12 Oct 1749     The property passes to Thomas Barber's nephew, also a Thomas Barber, via his will. Both are maltsters of Tonbridge. It is not known if the nephew Thomas and his future wife Elizabeth (daughter of John Waite) actually lived in the house. Given his occupation as a malster it is more likely that they lived in the house in Tonbridge town that Thomas also inherited from his uncle. (See transcription below).
4 Feb 1755     Thomas Barber dies intestate and administration is granted to his widow, Elizabeth Barber (daughter of John Waite). Her only child Thomas is just 2 years old.
19 Oct 1758     The Datchurst manorial court proclaims that the infant Thomas Barber is heir to the property held by his father who died in 1755. (See transcription below).
23 Oct 1764     The "infant" Thomas Barber (i.e. under the age of 21 years) is admitted to the property under the guardianship of his mother Elizabeth until he is 21 years of age. (See transcription below).
29 Jan 1776     Elizabeth Barber transfers her right of dower to her 23 year old son Thomas Barber. The Hildenborough property is mentioned as part of this indenture. We find in a later document that this was in exchange for an income to Elizabeth of £20 p.a. William Waite, yeoman of Tonbridge, appears to be a trustee for Elizabeth and is most likely her eldest brother.
The house is described as a "messuage … now divided into two several habitations ... with the yards, backsides, gardens and orchards thereunto respectively apportioned and … containing by estimation one acre of ground more or less, with appurtenances, situated, lying and being in Hildenborough in Tonbridge aforesaid and now in the tenure or occupation of Widow Kemp and John Wells".
10 Oct 1788     The property and others are mortgaged to George Children to raise £500. Thomas Barber is said to be a malster of Ightham.
12 Oct 1801     The property is sold to George Children for £150 under a Lease and Release conveyance. Thomas Barber is described as a yeoman.
26 Dec 1801     The mortgage arranged in 1788 is discharged using proceeds from the sale of some of the properties held under the mortgage, including the Hildenborough property and another called Finches.
12 Nov 1813     The transfer of ownership from Thomas Barber to George Children in 1801 is recorded in the Datchurst manorial court rolls. The property is described as a messuage or tenement, garden and two orchards. (See transcription below).
c1840     The entry in the Datchurst court roll dated 2 September 1862 shows the next owner after George Children to be Thomas Peckham. The 1838 Tonbridge tithe map shows him occupying plot 652 in Hildenborough, comprising a house, shop, garden, yard, etc of 1 acre, 1 rod and 8 perches, and with a vicarial tithe (paid to the resident vicar) of 3s/-. The map shows this to be almost exactly across the road from the Half Moon public house. This is therefore the location of Widow Mary Barber's house. (See map Fig. A3-1)
1841 Census     Occupying the property are brothers Edward and Thomas Peckham, both aged 60 years, with Edward Peckham aged 30 years, wife Sophia aged 35 years and children. Thomas and both Edwards are wheelwrights.
1851 Census     Edward Peckham, wheelwright, and wife Sophia and family occupy the property with Edward Peckham, widower, aged 70 years, and Thomas his uncle, aged 72 years. Thomas was later buried at Leigh on 19 May 1851 ("age 72 years").
1861 Census     Edward Peckham, wheelwright, and wife Sophia and family occupy the property. It appears that the older Edward Peckham has died.
2 Sep 1862     The Datchurst manorial court rolls record the admission of Edward Peckham, carpenter, to the property on the death of Thomas Peckham, the previous owner. The property was also enfranchised at this time, no longer beholden to the manor (i.e. now freehold). The property is described as:
"Copyhold messuage or tenement garden and two orchards lying to the highway leading from Tonbridge to Sevenoaks towards the East and to land at one time of Wickenden formerly Whittakers afterwards Eldridges then of Thomas Barton [Barber] afterwards of George Children then of his assignees and since of Thomas Peckham deceased". (See full transcription below).
12 Jan 1863     According to a family tree in www.Ancestry.co.uk, Edward Peckham, wife Sophia and the three youngest children emigrated in 1863 on board the ship Pharamond, arriving Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, to join their older children who had emigrated a year earlier. Edward died on 12 September 1866 aged 56 years of wounds inflicted by a leopard attack.

SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS

Purchase of Cottage, Barn & Orchard (about 1 acre) in Hildenborough by Mary Barber, 1691.

On 21st October 1691 the widow Mary Barber became the owner of a small cottage in Hildenborough. Remarkably, the title still survives; that is, a copy of the entry in the Datchurst manorial court rolls which records her admission to the property. It is transcribed (from the Latin) below:
Datchurst
Court Baron held in the same place on Wednesday, the twenty first day of October in the one thousand six hundred and ninety first year of our Lord, by Thomas Weller, under steward in the same place.
To this Court came George Petley, gent, and George Hooper junior, gent, two of the customary tenants of this manor, and surrendered into the lord's hands, by the acceptance of the aforesaid steward,
One tenement or cottage, one barn and one orchard, and two roods of land by estimation, with the appurtenances, lying on the highway leading between Tonbridge and Sevenoaks towards the east and north, and the lands late of Francis Skeffington esquire towards the south, held by copy of the rolls of court, to the use and behoof of Mary Barber, widow, and her heirs.
And hereupon the aforesaid Mary comes, in her own person, and seeks to be admitted to the aforesaid tenements,
To which Mary, indeed, the lord of the aforesaid manor, through his aforesaid under-steward, granted seisin thereof by rod,
To have and to hold to the aforenamed Mary and her heirs, at the will of the lord, according to the custom of the manor, by copy of the rolls of court, by the rent and services formerly due and of right accustomed in respect thereof.
And she gives to the lord, as a fine, according to the custom etc.
Fine for the same 6d                         Thomas Weller, Steward
(Transcribed by Gillian Rickard for Geoffrey Barber, April 2014)

Receipt for work done by William Dudson to Widow Barber's house, 1692.

This receipt was documented in a Hildenborough local history book (Cope and Dash, 2007) and also on the Hildenborough parish council website. The original receipt has not been found despite a number of searches at the Tonbridge Library and the Kent History and Library Centre. The receipt is said to read:
March 19th 1692: Day work dun for the widow barber in Hildenborrow for whighting the old house William Dudson 2 dayes
Will Dudson 2 dayes
£ 0 - 4 - 0
£ 0 - 2 - 8
March 24th: Day for making the great oven and hanging the furnace and building the flew
William Dudson 4 dayes
Will Dudson 4 dayes
£ 0 - 8 - 0
£ 0 - 5 - 4
June 27th: Day for plaisering and whighting the walls of the old house and beame filling and meaning the wall of the barn
William Dudson 2 dayes and 3 quarters
Will Dudson 2 dayes and 3 quarters
For building a stack of chimneys of 4 fiors [flues?]
£ 0 - 5 - 6
£ 0 - 3 - 8
£ 2 - 10 - 0

Transfer of Mary Barber's House to Son Thomas Barber, 1730.

On 13 October 1730, two years before her death, Mary Barber transferred her house in Hildenborough to her surviving son Thomas (Richard had died in 1722) and this is documented in the court rolls for the manors of Datchurst, Lamport, Martin Abbey and Nizells, 1718-1884:
Manor of Datchurst
Lamport Martin
Abbie and Nisell
At the Court Baron of our Lord King George the Second, Lord of the aforesaid Manor, held in the same place on the twelfth day of October in the fourth year of the reign of our Lord the said King, and in the year of our Lord 1730,
Before Thomas Freebody, gentleman, Deputy Steward of Matthew Hickeringill, esquire, Steward in the same place by the patent of the Honourable John, Earl of Leicester, Chief Steward in the same place,
It is enrolled thus;
Item to this Court came Mary Barber, a customary tenant of this manor of Datchurst, and in full court surrendered by rod, into the hands of the lord of the aforesaid manor, by the acceptance of his aforesaid under-steward,
One messuage or tenement, one barn, one garden and two orchards, with the appurtenances, lying on the highway leading from Tonbridge to Sevenoaks towards the east, and with the lands late of Francis Skeffington esquire towards the south, held by an annual rent of six pence and other services,
To the use and behoof of Thomas Barber, his heirs and assigns for ever.
Which Thomas Barber, indeed, is present here in Court in his own person, and seeks to be admitted to the aforesaid premises, with the appurtenances,
To whom the lord of the aforesaid manor, through his aforesaid under-steward, granted seisin thereof by rod,
To have to you [in error for "him"], the aforenamed Thomas Barber, his heirs and assigns for ever,
To hold of the lord, by rod, at the will of the lord, according to the custom of that manor, by the rent and services formerly due and of right accustomed in respect thereof.
And he gives to the lord, as a fine, etc.
And he is admitted as tenant thereof.
And he makes fealty to the lord etc.
By Thomas Freebody
(Transcribed by Gillian Rickard for Geoffrey Barber, April 2014)

Transfer of Mary Barber's House to her Grandson, Thomas Barber, 1749.

At the Datchurst manorial court held on 12 October 1749 Thomas Barber was admitted to the Hildenborough property previously owned by his uncle and before that his grandmother, the widow Mary Barber:
"The Homag aforesaid upon their oaths present that Thomas Barber a customary tenant of the Manor of Datchurst dyed [died] seized [possessed] of a customary messuage, garden and two orchards lying by the King's highway to the east and lands by then held of [blank] Wickenden and [blank] Whitaker to the south, held by the said manor by copy of court roll by will of the lord according to the customs of the said manor and the yearly rent of six pence. And that he Devised the same to Thomas Barber". (Transcribed by G. Barber, 2014)

Proclamation of Great Grandson, Thomas Barber, as Heir to Mary Barber's House, 1758.

On 19 October 1758 the Datchurst manorial court proclaimed that the infant Thomas Barber was heir to the property held by his father who died in 1755. The delay of a number of years between one tenant dying and his successor being admitted to the property was not uncommon and probably due to the courts not being held every year.
"they present that Thomas Barber nephew of Thomas Barber since the last court dyed [died] seized of a customary messuage or tenement and a garden and two orchards lying by the highway leading from Tonbridge to Sevenoaks towards the east and to the lands of [blank] Wickenden and [blank] Whitaker to the south which he held of the said Manor by copy of court roll by will of the lord according to the customs of the said manor and the yearly rent of six pence and that Thomas Barber his son is heir. First proclamation made for Thomas Barber son of Thomas Barber to take up his copyhold estate. (Transcribed by G. Barber, 2014)

Transfer of Mary Barber's House to her Great Grandson, Thomas Barber, under Guardianship by Elizabeth, 1764.

On 23 October 1764 the "infant" Thomas Barber (i.e. under the age of 21 years) was admitted to the property under the guardianship of his mother Elizabeth until he is 21 years of age. It is interesting to note that the court was held at the Half Moon Inn across the road from the Barber's property.
Manors of Datchurst Lamport Martin Abbey and Nizel
The Court Baron of our Sovereign Lord George the Third by the Grace of God of Great Britain France and Ireland King Defender of the Faith and Lord of the said Manor held at the house of John Galt and called or known by the name or sign of the Half Moon on the twenty third day of October in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and sixty four Before Francis Austen Gentleman Deputy Steward to his Grace the Duke of Dorset High Steward there
Essoins: None
Homage: John Children, Thomas Webb, Joseph Maynard. Sworn
First the said Homage being sworn and charged upon their oath do present and say that Thomas Barber Infant Son and Heir of Thomas Barber deceased came into court and by Elizabeth his Mother and Guardian prayed to be admitted to all that customary messuage Tenement Guardian and two orchards lying to the Highway leading from Tonbridge to Sevenoaks towards the East and to the lands of [blank] Wickenden and later Mr Whittaker but now Eldridge to the South late his Fathers the said Thomas Barber deceased which he held by copy of court roll and yearly rent of sixpence To whom the Lord by his said Deputy Steward granted and delivered seizin thereof by the rod To have and to hold the said customary messuage or tenement garden and two orchards with the appurtenances unto the said Thomas Barber is Heirs and Assignes for ever by copy of court roll at the will of the Lord according to the custom of the said manor by the rents and services therefore due accustomed And he gave to the Lord for a fine for such his estate sixpence and fealty is respited [postponed] until the said Thomas Barber shall attain his age of twenty one years And afterwards sitting the same court the custody of the body of the said Thomas Barber the Infant as also the rents and profits of the said messuage and premises were granted and committed unto the said Elizabeth barber until the said Thomas Barber the Infant should attain his age of twenty one years She rendering to this court a just amount of the said guardianship when thereto required.
(Transcribed by G. Barber, 2014)

Transfer of Mary Barber's House to George Children, 1813 (Sold 1801).

The Hildenborough property was sold in 1801 but the entry in the Datchurst manorial court roll was not made until 1813. It would appear they were fined 10 shillings each for their tardiness:
"Also they present that at this court came Thomas Barber one of the customary tenants of the Manor of Datchurst and then and there in full and open court surrendered into the hands of the lord of the said manor by the hands and acceptance of the said Deputy Steward by the rod according to the custom of the said manor all that customary messuage or tenement garden and two orchards lying to the highway leading from Sevenoaks to Tonbridge towards the east and to the lands of [blank] Wickenden formerly Whitakers and since Eldridges and late his father Thomas Barber held of the said manor by copy of court roll and yearly rent of sixpence To the use and behoof of George Children Esq his Heirs and Assigns for ever
- amerce the defaulters ten shillings each".
(Transcribed by G. Barber, 2014)

Transfer of Mary Barber's House to Edward Peckham, 1862.

The admission of Edward Peckham to the property on the death of Thomas Peckham, the previous owner. The property was also enfranchised at this time, no longer beholden to the manor (i.e. now freehold).
Manors of Hildenborough otherwise Datchurst, Lamport, Martin Abbey and Nizells in the Honor of Otford in the County of Kent
Be it remembered that by Indenture made the second day of September one thousand eight hundred and sixty two Between Charles Alliston of Mancetter Lodge near Atherstone in the County of Warwick Esquire, George Alliston of Warnford Court Throgmorton Street in the City of London Esquire and Smith Spencer Wigg of Lincolns Inn in the County of Middlesex Esquire of the one part and Edward Peckham of Hildenborough in the Parish of Tonbridge in the County of Kent Carpenter of the other part For the consideration therein mentioned the said Charles Alliston George Alliston and Smith Spencer Wigg did grant release and confirm unto the said Edward Peckham (party hereto) and his heirs All that customary or copyhold messuage or tenement garden and two orchards lying to the Highway leading from Tonbridge to Sevenoaks towards the East and to land at one time of Wickenden formerly Whittakers afterwards Eldridges then of Thomas Barton [Barber] afterwards of George Children then of his Assignees and since of Thomas Peckham deceased within and holden of the Manor of Hildenborough otherwise Datchurst aforesaid at the yearly rent of six pence Together with all rights members and appurtenances To hold unto the said Edward Peckham party hereto his heirs and assigns for ever absolutely enfranchised and acquitted exonerated and for ever discharged of and from the Copyhold tenure thereof and of and from all yearly and other payments rents quit rents chief rents customary or copyhold rents fines heriots suits and services and all other or customary or copyhold payments duties services or customs whatsoever which by or according to the custom of the said Manor of Hildenborough otherwise Datchurst the said messuages or tenements and hereditaments thereby granted and released or any of them were or was or had been subject or liable to or charged or chargeable with as copyhold premises holden of or as possessed of the same Manor.
Examined Henly Grove Smith [Steward]
(Transcribed by G. Barber, July 2014.)

Abraham Barber

b. 3 March 1660
FatherWilliam Barber b. c 1620, d. 1668
MotherMary Bate
     Abraham Barber was baptized on 3 March 1660 at Ticehurst, Sussex, England, only father's name given.1 He was the son of William Barber and Mary Bate.

Citations

  1. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/).

Ada Lillian Barber

b. 1 December 1890, d. 5 April 1966
FatherJames Wells Barber b. 1854, d. 18 Feb 1928
MotherCatherine Gandy b. 1864, d. 1946
     Ada Lillian Barber was born on 1 December 1890 at Englewood, New Jersey, United States. She was the daughter of James Wells Barber and Catherine Gandy.
Ada Lillian Barber married William Whitney Talman on 4 February 1913 at United States.
The following information was found on the rootsweb website under "Ancestries of Miscellaneous Celebrities (William Talman):
William Whitney Talman: b. 14 Jul 1878 Detroit, MI; V.P. of electronics company; m. 4 Feb 1913
Michigan: A Centennial History of the State and Its People, vol. 4 (biography), Chicago, 1939; pp. 504-505“William Whitney Talman, vice president and treasurer of the Hoskins Manufacturing Company, with offices in the David Stott Building in Detroit....Mr. [Talman was born July 14, 1878, in the family home at the corner of Congress and Antoine streets in Detroit, a son of Williams [sic] Swift and Susan (Sawyer) Talman, both natives of Rochester, New York. They were married at Rochester and came to Michigan about 1860, going first to Saginaw, where the father engaged in the salt business. In 1865 he removed to Detroit, where he established an insurance agency, carrying on in the business until his death, at the age of fifty-six years. His wife survived him until 1914 and had reached the age of seventy-six years when she passed away. They had a family of five children, of whom William W. is the youngest and the only son....On the 4th of February, 1913, Mr. Talman married Miss Ada Barber, a native of Englewood, New Jersey, and a daughter of James and Catherine (Gandy) Barber. Her father, now deceased, was engaged in the shipping business with his brother under the name of the Barber Steamship Lines. Mrs. Talman...by her marriage has become the mother of three sons. William Whitney Jr., born in Detroit, February 4, 1915, attended Dartmouth College and is now interested in a theater in New York City....It is interesting...to know that the grandmother of Mr. Talman in the paternal line was a descendant of Colonel Fitzhugh, who was a Revolutionary soldier and member of Washington’s staff...”]
3. Ada Barber: b. 1 Dec 1890 Englewood, Bergen Co., NJ; d. 5 Apr 1966 Los Angeles Co., CA [CADI: Ada B. Talman, mother Gandy].
Ada Lillian Barber died on 5 April 1966 at Los Angeles, California, United States, at age 75.

Family

William Whitney Talman b. 14 Jul 1878
Marriage*
Ada Lillian Barber married William Whitney Talman on 4 February 1913 at United States
Children

Alfred Barber

b. 28 December 1850
MotherElizabeth Barber b. 9 Dec 1828, d. 24 Feb 1916
     Alfred Barber was born on 28 December 1850 at 11 Gun Yard, St Botolph, Aldgate, London, England.1 He was the son of Elizabeth Barber.
On 30 March 1851 Alfred Barber lived at 11 Gunn Yard, St Botolph, Aldgate, Middlesex, England.
Alfred Barber was an illegitimate child of Elizabeth Barber and was subsequently raised by her parents Robert and Jane Barber. The birth certificate of Alfred Barber shows that he was born at 11 Gunn Yard, Aldgate and the mother was Elizabeth Barber of 38 Camomile St, London. No father was given. The 1851 census for 11 Gunn Yard, St Botolph, Aldgate has an Alfred Barber, 3 months, nurse child (i.e. no relation to the family he was with) born Middlesex, Aldgate. The 1851 census for All Hallows London Wall, Middlesex at 38 Camomile St has Elizabeth Barber, age 22 yrs, unmarried, servant, b. Brighton, Sussex. She is working for Saul and Sarah Yates whose eldest son Alfred (the likely father?) is aged 26 years. Both Saul and Alfred are solicitors. Alfred Yates died on 23 Oct 1851 at 38 Camomile Street, London of phthisis (TB).
On 13 Apr 1857, Saul and Sarah Yates emigrated to New Zealand with Elizabeth Barber on the ship "Dinapore" departing Gravesend and arriving Auckland on 5 Aug 1857. On the voyage Elizabeth met her future husband, George Tunnicliffe, and they married on 8 Aug 1857, 3 days after arriving in Auckland. Alfred was left behind in Brighton and in the 1861 census is living with his grandparents, Robert & Jane Barber, in Brighton (age 10 yrs born London). Alfred's marriage certificate states his father is Robert Barber, a cabinet maker, who was actually his grandfather. Elizabeth and George had three surviving children who all married in New Zealand.2
On 7 April 1861 Alfred Barber lived at 23 Kensington Gardens, Brighton, Sussex, England, living with his grandparents, Robert and Jane Barber.
On 2 April 1871 Alfred Barber lived at North St, Brighton, Sussex, England, living with William and Rebecca Ollive and his grandmother, Jane.
Alfred Barber was a printer compositor on 2 April 1871.
Alfred Barber married Miriam Beall, daughter of Richard Beall and Sarah Wright, on 20 October 1872 at St James Church, Shoreditch, Middlesex, England, by banns.3
The marriage certificate states that Alfred's father is Robert Barber, a cabinet maker. This is actually his grandfather as he was born illegitimate and never knew his father. It also confirms the link to Robert and Jane Barber in Brighton as the occupation is correct. His birth certificate links him to Elizabeth Barber born c1872 Brighton (confirmed on census records), and her death certificate in New Zealand states her father is Robert Barber.
Alfred Barber was a printer compositor on 5 April 1891.
On 5 April 1891 Alfred Barber and Miriam Beall lived at 40 Friar St, Southwark, London, England.
On 31 March 1901 Alfred Barber and Miriam Beall lived at 76 Darwin St, Newington, Southwark, London, England.4
Alfred Barber was a jobbing compositor on 31 March 1901.
On 2 April 1911 Alfred Barber and Miriam Beall lived at 13 Dagmar Rd, Camberwell, London, England.5
In December 1917 Alfred Barber and Miriam Beall lived at 40 St Julian's Farm Road, West Norwood, Surrey, England.

Family

Miriam Beall b. 1851, d. 22 Dec 1917
Marriage*
Alfred Barber married Miriam Beall, daughter of Richard Beall and Sarah Wright, on 20 October 1872 at St James Church, Shoreditch, Middlesex, England, by banns.3 
Children

Citations

  1. [S77] Birth certificate of Alfred Barber, born 28 Dec 1850, registered 4 Feb 1851 in the Registration District of East London Union, London, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 2 Page 234).
  2. [S482] Death certificate of Alfred Yates, died 23 Oct 1851, registered 24 Oct 1851 in the Registration District of City of London, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 2 Page 128).
  3. [S85] Marriage certificate of Alfred Barber and Miriam Beall, married 20 Oct 1872 in the Registration District of Shoreditch, Middlesex, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 1c Page 228).
  4. [S72] 1901 Census for England "RG13 piece 373 folio 129 page 49."
  5. [S73] 1911 Census for England "RG14PN2511 RG78PN84 RD27 SD3 ED27 SN317."