Harriet Honeysett

     Harriet Honeysett married Henry Rushman circa 1840 at Sussex, England. As of circa 1840, her married name was Rushman.
Harriet Honeysett married Robert Hollibone, son of John Hollibone and Elizabeth Manser, in 1859 at Sussex, England. As of 1859, her married name was Hollibone.

Family 1

Henry Rushman d. 1858
Marriage*
Harriet Honeysett married Henry Rushman circa 1840 at Sussex, England

Family 2

Robert Hollibone b. 1822, d. 1873
Marriage*
Harriet Honeysett married Robert Hollibone, son of John Hollibone and Elizabeth Manser, in 1859 at Sussex, England

Henry Rushman

d. 1858
     Henry Rushman married Harriet Honeysett circa 1840 at Sussex, England.
Henry Rushman died in 1858 at Sussex, England.

Family

Harriet Honeysett
Marriage*
Henry Rushman married Harriet Honeysett circa 1840 at Sussex, England

Origins of Nynne Barber alias Nynne

      The Origins of the Surname NYNNE (in southern England at least)

The use of "Nynne" in the surname (and its many variant spellings) was first encountered in a marriage licence dated 1672 between Thomas "Barber alias Nin" and Mary Rootes, both of Tonbridge. As the focus of my research turned to Rotherfield in Sussex I discovered a number of generations of families with the "Barber alias Nynne" surname.
Although Barber, Nynne and Barber alias Nynne have been used interchangeably throughout the records, the trend has been for Nynne to predominate in the early 1500's, then Nynne alias Barber going into the 1600s and then just Barber after the move to Kent. Interestingly, my 12xg grandfather was recorded as "John Nynd" when he was appointed a churchwarden at the end of 1531 and then "John Barber" in the first entry for the churchwarden's accounts for 1532, and then John Nynde in the same accounts later that year. If I was to speculate I would say that it seems like he knew his real surname was Barber but everyone else referred to him as Nynne, at least in their early years in Rotherfield. Perhaps that is why Barber won out in the end. Unfortunately I have not been able to discover why two surnames were used, although it was not an uncommon practice for those times. One possibility is that he (or someone in an earlier generation) had a wife whose maiden name was Nynne and because her family had higher status he was called by that name. A possible connection based on this line of thought is discussed at the end of this section. It could also have been because he was a child from a previous marriage and was known by his mother's previous married name (his true patrilineal surname) as well as her subsequent married name. Or he may have been illegitimate in which case there is a chance that neither Barber nor Nynne is the true patrilineal name.

Origin of Surnames in England

Although this is a complex subject the following points provide some useful background:

1. Kennett (2012) explains that surnames started to develop in Western Europe from the 11th century onwards. It began with the nobility and then spread to the rest of society so that by the 15th century fixed hereditary names (i.e. surnames) were common although they did emerge in different areas at different times, some much later.
2. Redmonds et al (2011) states that before the Norman Conquest no one in England possessed surnames and that it began with the Baron's wanting to identify with their estates in Normandy or their new lands in England. By the year 1200 most knights in southern England had surnames but it took much longer in the north. By 1250 the fashion for surnames spread among the ordinary folk, especially in southern England and East Anglia. The period 1300-1350 was a particularly formative time and by the early 15th century few English families were without a (hereditary) surname, although some continued to evolve. Most surnames today go back no earlier that the 14th century.
3. The adoption of surnames was driven by the increasing use of written records during the 12th - 14th centuries and the need for a more precise means of identification for such purposes as to prove ownership of land and property for inheritance and to identify debtors and creditors of various feudal dues and taxes. According to Reaney (1997) it was a process that was, in general, driven more by officials than the individual, although the actual choice of a surname appears to have been made more by neighbours (as would a nickname) than by clerks. Eventually everyone came to accept that a surname was a normal requirement of society.
4. Of relevance to the Nynne surname is the work by Redmonds et al which show that uncommon surnames often have just one origin, suggesting a common ancestor.
The approach to the study of surnames has changed fundamentally in recent years due to the computerisation of historic surname data (e.g. census returns, hearth tax, subsidy rolls, church records, registrations of births, marriages and deaths), better analytical tools (geographical information systems) and cheaper DNA analysis. In the early 20th century the approach was based on finding the earliest occurrence of a particular surname and then looking for the meaning of the name through an understanding of old languages and place names. The availability of better tools now enables this work to be conducted in greater detail by identifying the geographical concentrations of a particular surname and then studying how it evolved by using individual family histories (genealogy) and DNA.1,2,3

The Use of an Alias

The use of an alias was very common and was used to connect the different names of a person in order to be more precise about their identity, especially in the written records. A person may acquire different names due to remarriage in the family, illegitimacy or for simply being given a name by others (e.g. a nickname). There are a number of situations which can give rise to the use of an alias. Some examples are:
1. A man marrying an heiress or socially superior woman and adopting her family's surname to gain advantage;
2. An illegitimate child might be known by two surnames - his mother's maiden name (under which he was born) and her married name (i.e. his step-father's name);
3. A person may want to clarify entitlement to property recorded in the manorial rolls under another name. His current surname may be different due to family re-marriage.
4. Two or more people with the same name in the village and other villagers giving them a nickname based on where they lived or even their appearance.
In all the above cases the use of an alias served to better identify that person. Its use diminished over time and became obsolete by the mid 19th century. By the 20th century it became associated with fraudulent activity (i.e. by people wanting to disguise their real identity) and had negative connotations. This was certainly not the case in earlier times.
It is not known when the Barber alias Nynne surname was first used but it was at least from 1530 in Rotherfield in Sussex. John was recorded as both John Nynne and John Barber between 1530-32 and as John Nynde when he was buried in 1548. His widow was buried as Joan Nynne alias Barber in 1577. His son John's children were baptised as Nynne but their children were baptised Nynne alias Barber and by 1640 the children are baptised just Barber. We can therefore make the following observations: firstly, that the use of the alias persisted for four generations while the family lived in Rotherfield suggesting it was important; secondly, that it was usually written "Nynne alias Barber" (i.e. Nynne first) in the 16th century; and thirdly, that Barber won out in the end. Could this suggest that his legal name was Barber but that he grew up in a Nynne household? This would occur if he was born illegitimate where the mother's maiden name was Barber and she subsequently married a Nynne, or if he was born as a result of his mother's first marriage to a Barber and who, upon being widowed, later married a Nynne. Another scenario would be that the mother's maiden name was Nynne and she married a Barber but they used both surnames because Nynne was better known or had higher status.
In 1672 the family had moved to Tonbridge, but it was still important for Thomas Barber to state his name as "Barber alias Nin" [sic] on his marriage licence, probably because he had inherited property in Rotherfield which was held under that name in the manorial records. The sale of his parent's cottage in Rotherfield village in 1677 is the last known instance of its use. Living in Tonbridge, Thomas used only the surname Barber on his children's baptisms and the surname Nynne never appears again.

The Surname Nynne

The surname Nynne is quite rare, particularly in Sussex, although it does appear to become more common in Kent as one goes back into early manorial records (13th-15th centuries) where the surnames "atte Nynne", "de la Nynne" and "Nynne" appear in various documents. It is even rarer in the combination "Nynne alias Barber" (or vice versa) as this is found in only two parishes in Sussex: Rotherfield (primarily) and nearby Ticehurst. I would suggest that anyone with this surname in Sussex is on the same family tree.
A starting point in determining the origin of a surname is to look at its distribution across Britain. This information is available for the 1881 census and the distribution map for the 32 occurrences of Nynne, Nynn, Ninn and Nin is shown here.
The map clearly shows the name to be rare, possibly even close to extinction, and probably a single origin surname. The highest concentration was in Ashford, Kent where there were 14 occurrences (all spelt Ninn). The next highest was 5 occurrences in Middlesbrough, North Yorkshire (all spelt Nynne) and 3 in Newcastle Upon Tyne (all spelt Nynn).
The author conducted a survey of the occurrence of the surname Nynne (and variants) in the on-line catalogue of documents held by The National Archives in England between c1250 and 1500 and found the name occurred mostly in the in the Kent parishes of Egerton and, in particular, Great Chart suggesting that this could be where the surname originated. Both of these parishes are within the Ashford area mentioned above.
The subsidy rolls (lists of taxpayers) provide valuable data for surname distribution studies although they do not include everyone, only the taxpayers. The Kent Lay Subsidy Roll of 1334/5 has only one occurrence of the Nynne surname and that is William atte Nynne in the Hundred of [Great] Chart who paid 4s/0¾d. This was a tax based on the value of moveable goods (one fifteenth for rural areas and one tenth for urban areas) with the poorest inhabitants exempt.4
One of the earliest occurrences of the name is in April 1259, also at Great Chart in Kent, where a Simon atte Nynne is one of a number of witnesses on a document concerning an annual payment made at the manorial court. The names of some of the other witnesses are interesting in the context of surname study: Thomas the smith, William of Upton, Henry son of Matthew, Benjamin the bedel. Some of these names may have evolved into hereditary surnames and others not. For example Thomas "the smith" may not have been a hereditary name at this stage and may simply be a descriptor reflecting his occupation, in which case the name "smith" would be termed a byname. It is only called a surname when it is shown to have become hereditary and passed from father to son. We can be sure though that "atte Nynne" was indeed a surname in 1259 as the name occurs thereafter in Great Chart and so had become hereditary. This would mean that Nynne became a surname fairly early and is therefore older than most which, according to Redmonds et al, only date back to the 14th century.5
Further investigation of the area around Great Chart reveals the likely connection to a local place name, Ninne House manor. The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent, Volume 7, by Edward Hasted published in 1798 mentions this manor in Great Chart:
NINNEHOUSE is a manor, situated on the northern side of the quarry-hill, not far from the river Stour, which was antiently [anciently] the residence of John at Nin, whose figure, in armour, was with those of other eminent men formerly in the north window of the north chancel of this church; in whose descendants it continued till the reign of Henry VI. when it was alienated to Sharpe; one of whom, William Sharpe, of this place, died possessed of it in 1499, and lies buried in the middle isle of this church, with his five wives, as does his descendant William Sharpe the elder, who died in 1583.
The location of Ninn(e) House is shown here.
A Ninn farm and Ninn Lane survive there today but unfortunately the lead light windows in the church are long gone, possibly removed during the time of Oliver Cromwell in the mid 1600's.
Following the publication of an article I wrote for the Sussex Family Historian a member of the Sussex Family History Group gave this explanation for the surname Nynne.6
The online A2A section of the National Archives holds all the clues you need to unlock the story of the name. You've already quoted one significant clue in your article - the name 'de la Nynne'. Nynne clearly falls into the group of surnames which derive from a place or specific location. If you search further in the above records you'll find that the name in Great Chart also appears as 'de la hinne', 'de la Inne' and 'atten Inne' in the mid to late 1200's. A reputable Middle English dictionary (or similar online info) will reveal that hinne, hin, ynne, ine and inne all meant the same thing in medieval times - a lodging house or rooms for guests (i.e. an inn). The word 'inn' also existed in Saxon times and has never changed. When 'atten' is placed in front of a locative name beginning with a vowel such as 'inne', you'll find that when spoken out loud the last letter of 'atten' transfers across. Try this yourself and see! Any words which were not in Latin were written down phonetically at this time, so the clerks wrote down exactly what they heard - which was ninne. This also happened to other locative words which became surnames, such as ash and oak. 'Atten' gradually became atte, resulting in the name 'atte Nynne' or 'atte Ninne', masking its original form entirely. The records in A2A chart every step of this interesting process. Only once the surname had become fixed and hereditary (this happened at different times in different areas) would 'de la' and 'atte' have been dropped, leaving just Nynne, Ninne, Nin, Nenne etc. Ninnehouse simply meant the inn house at Great Chart manor. You may know that Great Chart (owned by Christchurch Priory, Canterbury) was just one of numerous manors the priory held in Kent. There were others elsewhere. Inns became increasingly common in 12th and 13th century England and because manors were more important than villages, these would have been the location for the earliest inns. Ninnehouse would have been one of several farms on Great Chart manor and the one which specifically provided food and overnight accommodation for visitors, travellers and pilgrims and stabling for their horses. A John atte Nynne does appear in the archives, as a witness to a grant. You will find him in 1349 in the A2A records. Hasted's record (copied from elsewhere) saying that John was depicted in armour should be taken with a pinch of salt I think. There are no records of any knight with the name of Nynne or Ninne.
The surname Nynne would therefore be categorised as a locative surname being derived from a place-name. It is likely to be a single origin name (at least in southern England) meaning it would go back to just one ancestor who was the first to start using Nynne as a surname. Given its early occurrence as a surname (at least c1250) we could also speculate that the person of origin is more likely to be someone with a hereditary connection to the manor/farm rather than someone who just worked there, as otherwise the name would probably have been used just as a byname.
The surname Barber, on the other hand, is clearly an occupational, multi-origin surname and the Oxford "A Dictionary of English Surnames" (1997) states that the barber was formerly a regular practitioner in surgery and dentistry. This would have included bone setting, bloodletting and leeching, fire cupping, enemas, and the extraction of teeth; earning them the name "barber surgeons".
The surname Nynne has been spelt various ways (i.e. has many variants) - Nynne, Nyne, Ninne, Nynde, Nynder, Nynd, Nin, Ninn and Nyn with the most common spelling being Nynne prior to c1600. From 1700 onwards, the name is spelt Ninn in Kent. A list of Ninn births in England between 1950 and 2006 contains just nine names, eight in Kent and one in Sussex, highlighting the rarity of the name today. Interestingly, five of these are in Ashford, Kent which is adjacent to Great Chart, the likely ancestral home of the name.
The surname would have almost certainly been pronounced "Ninn". In Kent, the surname was most commonly spelt "Nynne" up to about c1600 and then "Ninn". This is just a peculiarity of spelling of those times, where "i" was usually replaced by "y" and often an "e" put on the end to confirm the pronunciation as "ninn" and not "nine" or "ninny".
At present it is not known where John and Joan, the first Barber alias Nynnes in Rotherfield, were born or married. They appear in the manorial records in 1530 and there is no mention of either Barber or Nynne before then. The burial of a Robert Nynder [sic] on 1 Nov 1548 in Rotherfield is of interest as although there is no information to place him in any family, he could be a son of John and Joan, or a brother of either, or even an uncle or father. This is potentially significant because of a relationship between a Robert Nynne and the Nevill(e) family in Kent. The Neville family became lords of Rotherfield manor as a consequence of a marriage in 1450 and it remains with them to this day. In 1542 Thomas Neville, brother of the then Lord Bergavenny (lord of Rotherfield manor) and a lawyer and Speaker of the House of Commons, died at Mereworth castle, Kent and his will leaves bequests to his servants among who is a Robert Nynne who also acted as an executor of the will. Robert Nynne also appears as a witness in the will of John Godden of nearby Ryarsh in 1546 and was described as a yeoman of Maidstone in 1537. It is possible that John and Joan were linked to the family of this Robert Nynne who obviously had significant status in the Neville family. This could explain why the surname Nynne was favoured in the 16th century in Rotherfield if, for example, a daughter of the Nynne family married a Barber.7,8,9

© Geoffrey Barber 2015.

Citations

  1. [S561] T. King & D. Hey G. Redmonds, "Surnames, DNA & Family History", Oxford University Press, First Edition (2011) unknown isbn "pp. 2,3, 56,57."
  2. [S562] P.H. Reaney (Revised R.M. Wilson), "A Dictionary of English Surnames", Oxford University Press, unknown edition (1997) "pp. xiv-xlvi."
  3. [S563] Debbie Kennett, "The Surnames Handbook", The History Press, First Edition (2012) unknown isbn.
  4. [S564] Ed. H.A. Hanley and C.W. Chalklin ed. "Kent Lay Subsidy Roll of 1334/35", Kent Archaeological Society, unknown edition (2008).
  5. [S565] Court books of the manor of Great Chart in Kent, England, April 1259 (CCA-DCc-ChAnt/C/322).
  6. [S566] S. Paskins ed. "Sussex Family Historian", Sussex Family History Group, Vol 20 No 3 (September 2012) "Vol. 20, No. 3, pp. 101-106."
  7. [S567] L.L. Duncan ed. "Medieval & Tudor Kent P.C.C. Wills", n.pub., unknown edition (unknown publish date) "Book 15, p. 551."
  8. [S568] Will of Sir Thomas Neville of Kent, England, made 23 May 1542, proved in the Prerogrative Court of Canterbury, 23 Oct 1542. (TNA: PROB 11/29, ff. 82-3).
  9. [S569] Will of John Godden of Ryarsh, Kent, England, made 26 Jul 1546, proved in the Consistory court of Rochester, 5 Oct 1546. (unknown document ref).

George Inskip

     George Inskip married Keziah Richardson, daughter of John Richardson and Elizabeth Hudson, on 6 April 1774 at Hellingly, Sussex, England, both of this parish.1

Family

Keziah Richardson b. 10 Nov 1752
Marriage*
George Inskip married Keziah Richardson, daughter of John Richardson and Elizabeth Hudson, on 6 April 1774 at Hellingly, Sussex, England, both of this parish.1 

Citations

  1. [S24] Index to Marriages, 1538-1837, Compact Disc SFHGCD003, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, 2008.

Publications Barber alias Nynne

     
History of the Old House, (Originally Marden’s Farm), in Hildenborough, Kent. (2014.)

Barber alias Nynne - Five Hundred Years of Family History in Rotherfield, Tonbridge and Brighton. (2015).
See main page on how to purchase this book.

George Meek's Grandfather. (2016.)

Great-Grandmother’s Secrets Revealed! (2015.)

Harriet Gladman's Embroidery (2017.)

The AKEHURST Wills of East Sussex 1541-1858 (2018.)

The Secret Life of Hesketh Davis Wells by Hilary Darque (2019.)

Benjamin Jeffery (1844-1912) - Life and Letters of an Otago Settler (2020.)

Margaret Moyce

     Margaret Moyce married William Waite, son of John Waite and Elizabeth Low, on 5 August 1748 at East Peckham, Kent, England, William of Tonbridge; Margaret of Wrotham.1 As of 5 August 1748, her married name was Waite.

Family

William Waite b. 27 Jan 1713/14, d. 1 Nov 1799
Marriage*
Margaret Moyce married William Waite, son of John Waite and Elizabeth Low, on 5 August 1748 at East Peckham, Kent, England, William of Tonbridge; Margaret of Wrotham.1 
Children

Citations

  1. [S151] Index to West Kent Marriages, KFHS CD-ROM36, 1538-1812, compiled by Sydney Smith, 59 Friar Road, Orpington Kent BR5 2BW, England.

John Waite

b. 17 November 1752
FatherWilliam Waite b. 27 Jan 1713/14, d. 1 Nov 1799
MotherMargaret Moyce
     John Waite was baptized on 17 November 1752 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.1 He was the son of William Waite and Margaret Moyce.

Citations

  1. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/).

Elizabeth Waite

b. 24 January 1755
FatherWilliam Waite b. 27 Jan 1713/14, d. 1 Nov 1799
MotherMargaret Moyce
     Elizabeth Waite was baptized on 24 January 1755 at Tonbridge, Kent, England, surname spelt WYATT.1 She was the daughter of William Waite and Margaret Moyce.
Elizabeth Waite married Thomas Elliott on 27 October 1782 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.2 As of 27 October 1782, her married name was Elliott.

Family

Thomas Elliott
Marriage*
Elizabeth Waite married Thomas Elliott on 27 October 1782 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.2 

Citations

  1. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/).
  2. [S151] Index to West Kent Marriages, KFHS CD-ROM36, 1538-1812, compiled by Sydney Smith, 59 Friar Road, Orpington Kent BR5 2BW, England.

Margaret Waite

b. 27 September 1758, d. 1827
FatherWilliam Waite b. 27 Jan 1713/14, d. 1 Nov 1799
MotherMargaret Moyce
     Margaret Waite was baptized on 27 September 1758 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.1 She was the daughter of William Waite and Margaret Moyce.
Margaret Waite married William Cronk on 11 May 1784 at Tonbridge, Kent, England, William Cronk of Seal.2 As of 11 May 1784, her married name was Cronk.
Margaret Waite died in 1827 at Seal, Kent, England.
Margaret Waite was buried on 21 January 1827 at Seal, Kent, England.

Family

William Cronk b. 1 May 1753, d. 1833
Marriage*
Margaret Waite married William Cronk on 11 May 1784 at Tonbridge, Kent, England, William Cronk of Seal.2 
Child

Citations

  1. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/).
  2. [S151] Index to West Kent Marriages, KFHS CD-ROM36, 1538-1812, compiled by Sydney Smith, 59 Friar Road, Orpington Kent BR5 2BW, England.

William Waite

b. 27 September 1758
FatherWilliam Waite b. 27 Jan 1713/14, d. 1 Nov 1799
MotherMargaret Moyce
     William Waite was baptized on 27 September 1758 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.1 He was the son of William Waite and Margaret Moyce.

Citations

  1. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/).

Jane Waite

b. circa 1750
FatherWilliam Waite b. 27 Jan 1713/14, d. 1 Nov 1799
MotherMargaret Moyce
     Jane Waite was baptized circa 1750 at Kent, England. She was the daughter of William Waite and Margaret Moyce.
Jane Waite married John Hutson on 24 December 1780 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.1,2 As of 24 December 1780, her married name was Hutson.

Family

John Hutson
Marriage*
Jane Waite married John Hutson on 24 December 1780 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.1,2 

Citations

  1. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) ""England, Kent, Parish Registers, 1538-1911," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QKJD-55SC : accessed 18 December 2015), John Hutson and Jane Wait, 24 Dec 1780; citing Marriage, Diocese of Rochester, Kent, England, Kent Archives Office, Maidstone; FHL microfilm 1,042,486."
  2. [S151] Index to West Kent Marriages, KFHS CD-ROM36, 1538-1812, compiled by Sydney Smith, 59 Friar Road, Orpington Kent BR5 2BW, England.

John Hutson

     John Hutson married Jane Waite, daughter of William Waite and Margaret Moyce, on 24 December 1780 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.1,2

Family

Jane Waite b. c 1750
Marriage*
John Hutson married Jane Waite, daughter of William Waite and Margaret Moyce, on 24 December 1780 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.1,2 

Citations

  1. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) ""England, Kent, Parish Registers, 1538-1911," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QKJD-55SC : accessed 18 December 2015), John Hutson and Jane Wait, 24 Dec 1780; citing Marriage, Diocese of Rochester, Kent, England, Kent Archives Office, Maidstone; FHL microfilm 1,042,486."
  2. [S151] Index to West Kent Marriages, KFHS CD-ROM36, 1538-1812, compiled by Sydney Smith, 59 Friar Road, Orpington Kent BR5 2BW, England.

Thomas Elliott

     Thomas Elliott married Elizabeth Waite, daughter of William Waite and Margaret Moyce, on 27 October 1782 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.1

Family

Elizabeth Waite b. 24 Jan 1755
Marriage*
Thomas Elliott married Elizabeth Waite, daughter of William Waite and Margaret Moyce, on 27 October 1782 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.1 

Citations

  1. [S151] Index to West Kent Marriages, KFHS CD-ROM36, 1538-1812, compiled by Sydney Smith, 59 Friar Road, Orpington Kent BR5 2BW, England.

William Cronk

b. 1 May 1753, d. 1833
     William Cronk was baptized on 1 May 1753 at Seal, Kent, England.
William Cronk married Margaret Waite, daughter of William Waite and Margaret Moyce, on 11 May 1784 at Tonbridge, Kent, England, William Cronk of Seal.1
William Cronk died in 1833 at England.
William Cronk was buried on 15 January 1833 at England.

Family

Margaret Waite b. 27 Sep 1758, d. 1827
Marriage*
William Cronk married Margaret Waite, daughter of William Waite and Margaret Moyce, on 11 May 1784 at Tonbridge, Kent, England, William Cronk of Seal.1 
Child

Citations

  1. [S151] Index to West Kent Marriages, KFHS CD-ROM36, 1538-1812, compiled by Sydney Smith, 59 Friar Road, Orpington Kent BR5 2BW, England.

William Cronk

b. circa 1785, d. 14 May 1868
FatherWilliam Cronk b. 1 May 1753, d. 1833
MotherMargaret Waite b. 27 Sep 1758, d. 1827
     William Cronk was born circa 1785 at Seal, Kent, England. He was the son of William Cronk and Margaret Waite.
William Cronk married Elizabeth Stapely on 9 May 1809 at Seal, Kent, England, Elizabeth Stapely of Rotherfield, Sussex.1
William Cronk died on 14 May 1868 at Sevenoaks, Kent, England.

Family

Elizabeth Stapely d. 1834
Marriage*
William Cronk married Elizabeth Stapely on 9 May 1809 at Seal, Kent, England, Elizabeth Stapely of Rotherfield, Sussex.1 

Citations

  1. [S151] Index to West Kent Marriages, KFHS CD-ROM36, 1538-1812, compiled by Sydney Smith, 59 Friar Road, Orpington Kent BR5 2BW, England.

Elizabeth Stapely

d. 1834
     Elizabeth Stapely married William Cronk, son of William Cronk and Margaret Waite, on 9 May 1809 at Seal, Kent, England, Elizabeth Stapely of Rotherfield, Sussex.1 As of 9 May 1809, her married name was Cronk.
Elizabeth Stapely died in 1834 at Seal, Kent, England.
Elizabeth Stapely was buried on 23 February 1834 at Seal, Kent, England.

Family

William Cronk b. c 1785, d. 14 May 1868
Marriage*
Elizabeth Stapely married William Cronk, son of William Cronk and Margaret Waite, on 9 May 1809 at Seal, Kent, England, Elizabeth Stapely of Rotherfield, Sussex.1 

Citations

  1. [S151] Index to West Kent Marriages, KFHS CD-ROM36, 1538-1812, compiled by Sydney Smith, 59 Friar Road, Orpington Kent BR5 2BW, England.

Margery Coe

b. circa 1545, d. 1615
Father(?) Coe
     Margery Coe was born circa 1545 at England. She was the daughter of (?) Coe.
Margery Coe married Adam Farmer on 15 June 1569 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1 As of 15 June 1569, her married name was Farmer.
Margery Coe is mentioned in the will of Adam Farmer dated 11 April 1587 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.2
Margery Coe married Henry Hodely on 6 November 1591 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England, Margery is a widow.1 As of 6 November 1591, her married name was Hodely.
Margery Coe died in 1615 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
Margery Coe was buried on 11 September 1615 at St Denys, Rotherfield, Sussex, England.3

Family 1

Adam Farmer b. c 1540, d. Apr 1587
Marriage*
Margery Coe married Adam Farmer on 15 June 1569 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1 
Children

Family 2

Henry Hodely
Marriage*
Margery Coe married Henry Hodely on 6 November 1591 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England, Margery is a widow.1 
Child

Citations

  1. [S24] Index to Marriages, 1538-1837, Compact Disc SFHGCD003, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, 2008.
  2. [S657] Will of Adam Farmer of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 11 April 1587, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 23 May 1587. (ESRO: PBT 1/1/8/11).
  3. [S25] Index to Burials, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.

Margaret Farmer

b. 22 August 1578, d. 22 August 1578
FatherAdam Farmer b. c 1540, d. Apr 1587
MotherMargery Coe b. c 1545, d. 1615
     Margaret Farmer was born on 22 August 1578 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1
Margaret Farmer died on 22 August 1578 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
Margaret Farmer was buried on 23 August 1578 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.2 She was the daughter of Adam Farmer and Margery Coe.

Citations

  1. [S23] Index to Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.
  2. [S443] Rotherfield St Denys, Burials and MIs, undated, Rotherfield, Sussex (http://www.stdenysrotherfield.org.uk/familyhistory.htm).

(?) Farmer

b. 1580, d. 1580
FatherAdam Farmer b. c 1540, d. Apr 1587
MotherMargery Coe b. c 1545, d. 1615
     (?) Farmer was born in 1580 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England. She was the daughter of Adam Farmer and Margery Coe.
(?) Farmer died in 1580 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
(?) Farmer was buried on 13 January 1580 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England, "unbaptised daughter of Adam."1

Citations

  1. [S443] Rotherfield St Denys, Burials and MIs, undated, Rotherfield, Sussex (http://www.stdenysrotherfield.org.uk/familyhistory.htm).

Elizabeth Farmer

b. 19 February 1581
FatherAdam Farmer b. c 1540, d. Apr 1587
MotherMargery Coe b. c 1545, d. 1615
     Elizabeth Farmer was baptized on 19 February 1581 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England, (note 19 Feb 1580/81.)1 She was the daughter of Adam Farmer and Margery Coe.
Elizabeth Farmer is mentioned in the will of Adam Farmer dated 11 April 1587 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.2

Citations

  1. [S23] Index to Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.
  2. [S657] Will of Adam Farmer of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 11 April 1587, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 23 May 1587. (ESRO: PBT 1/1/8/11).

Adam Farmer

b. 14 June 1584, d. between 1641 and 1646
FatherAdam Farmer b. c 1540, d. Apr 1587
MotherMargery Coe b. c 1545, d. 1615
     Adam Farmer was baptized on 14 June 1584 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1 He was the son of Adam Farmer and Margery Coe.
Adam Farmer is mentioned in the will of Adam Farmer dated 11 April 1587 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.2
Adam Farmer was a tailor in 1619.3
Adam Farmer and Denise Hoadly obtained a marriage licence on 10 December 1619 at Archdeaconry of Lewes, Sussex, England, Adam FARMAR, tailor of Rotherfield; Denise HODLY, widow, of the same parish. Sponsors: Adam FARMER; Jn SMYTHER /yeo Framfield.3
Adam Farmer married Denise Hoadly on 20 December 1619 at Framfield, Sussex, England.3
Adam Farmer died between 1641 and 1646 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
Two possible burials at Rotherfield: 16 Dec 1641 or 3 Nov 1646.4

Family

Denise Hoadly d. 1647
Marriage License
Adam Farmer and Denise Hoadly obtained a marriage licence on 10 December 1619 at Archdeaconry of Lewes, Sussex, England, Adam FARMAR, tailor of Rotherfield; Denise HODLY, widow, of the same parish. Sponsors: Adam FARMER; Jn SMYTHER /yeo Framfield.3 
Marriage*
Adam Farmer married Denise Hoadly on 20 December 1619 at Framfield, Sussex, England.3 
Children

Citations

  1. [S23] Index to Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.
  2. [S657] Will of Adam Farmer of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 11 April 1587, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 23 May 1587. (ESRO: PBT 1/1/8/11).
  3. [S24] Index to Marriages, 1538-1837, Compact Disc SFHGCD003, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, 2008.
  4. [S443] Rotherfield St Denys, Burials and MIs, undated, Rotherfield, Sussex (http://www.stdenysrotherfield.org.uk/familyhistory.htm).

Alexander Farmer

b. 25 March 1571
FatherAdam Farmer b. c 1540, d. Apr 1587
MotherMargery Coe b. c 1545, d. 1615
     Alexander Farmer was baptized on 25 March 1571 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1 He was the son of Adam Farmer and Margery Coe.
Alexander Farmer is mentioned in the will of Adam Farmer dated 11 April 1587 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.2

Citations

  1. [S23] Index to Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.
  2. [S657] Will of Adam Farmer of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 11 April 1587, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 23 May 1587. (ESRO: PBT 1/1/8/11).

John Farmer

b. circa 1559, d. 1560
FatherJohn Farmer b. c 1520, d. c 1559
MotherOdyan Kent d. 1585
     John Farmer was born circa 1559 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England. He was the son of John Farmer and Odyan Kent.
John Farmer died in 1560 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
John Farmer was buried on 13 February 1560 at St Denys, Rotherfield, Sussex, England, "son of John."1

Citations

  1. [S25] Index to Burials, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project, "son of John."

John Catt

d. 1610
     John Catt married Avis Farmer, daughter of John Farmer and Odyan Kent, on 4 July 1572 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1
John Catt died in 1610 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
There are two burial possibilities for John Catt:
4 Mar 1610 at Rotherfield St Denys (weaver)
26 Feb 1610 at Rotherfield St Denys (senior.)2

Family

Avis Farmer b. 6 Jul 1548, d. 1633
Marriage*
John Catt married Avis Farmer, daughter of John Farmer and Odyan Kent, on 4 July 1572 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1 
Children

Citations

  1. [S24] Index to Marriages, 1538-1837, Compact Disc SFHGCD003, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, 2008.
  2. [S25] Index to Burials, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.

John Lockyer

d. 1596
     John Lockyer married Sylvester Farmer, daughter of John Farmer and Odyan Kent, on 30 May 1571 at Buxted, Sussex, England, Sylvester is of Rotherfield.1
John Lockyer died in 1596 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.2
John Lockyer was buried on 24 January 1596 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.2

Family

Sylvester Farmer b. 12 Feb 1546
Marriage*
John Lockyer married Sylvester Farmer, daughter of John Farmer and Odyan Kent, on 30 May 1571 at Buxted, Sussex, England, Sylvester is of Rotherfield.1 
Child

Citations

  1. [S24] Index to Marriages, 1538-1837, Compact Disc SFHGCD003, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, 2008.
  2. [S25] Index to Burials, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.

Adam Farmer

b. circa 1540, d. April 1587
     Adam Farmer was born circa 1540.
Adam Farmer married Margery Coe, daughter of (?) Coe, on 15 June 1569 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1
Adam Farmer was a weaver in 1587.2
Adam Farmer died in April 1587 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
Adam Farmer left a will made on 11 April 1587 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.2
In the name of God amen the xith daye of Aprill in the nyne and twentithe yeare of the raigne of our soveraigne Ladye Elizabethe by the grace of God Queene of Englande ffraunce and Irelandede defender of the ffaythe &c Ano dni 1587 [The 8 is unclear but matches the regnal year]. I Adam ffarmer of the pishe of Rotherfelde in the Countye of Sussex wever beinge of good and pfecte remembrance doe make and declare this my last will and testamente in maner and forme ffollowinge ffirste I geve and yelde my soule into the handes of the allmighty my saviour and redeemer and my bodye to the earthe from whence it came and desentlye to be buried accordinge to the laudable Custome of our countrye Item I geve and bequeathe to Margarye my wiffe my dwellinge howsse or tenamente situate and beinge in the towne of Rotherfelde aforesayde with the barne and other edifices and buildinges and also the Close garden orchard and other Customarye landes there unto belonginge To have and to holde to her and her assignes duringe her naturall lyffe Item I geve likewise to my sayde wyffe my freeholde landes lyinge and beinge in Rotherfelde aforesayde conteyninge by estimacon five acres of lande more or lesse to have and to holde unto her and her assignes for the [space?] and terme of Eight yeres next after my deceasse yf she // live soe longe a tyme fully to be complete and ended And after my sayd wiffes deceasse my will is that my sonne Alexander ffarmer his heyres and assignes shall have my sayd dwellinge howsse or tenamente with the other edifices and alsoe the close garden orchard and the Customarye landes aforesayd unto the sayde dwellinge howsse belonginge and appertayninge Item I geve and bequeathe unto my sonne Alexander ffarmer all those my loomes and stayes and other harnesse unto the Crafte of weavinge belonginge or appurteyninge and alsoe one cupborde one table and one forme now standinge and beinge in the Hall of my dwellinge howsse aforesayde uppon this condicon that the sayde Alexander my sonne shall finde sufficiente [securi]tyes when he shall come to the full age of one and twentye yeares to paye or cause to be payde to my daughter Katherine ffarmer within two yeares after that he the sayde Alexander shall receave the proffitte of the house and landes with other the premisses aforesayde after my wifes deceasse the full some of five poundes of lawfull money of England But if my sayde sonne Alexander when he shall [come] to the full age of one and twentye yeares aforesayde shall refuse to [finde] sufficient sureties as is aforesayde for the paymentte of the five poundes aforesayde unto my daughter Katherine then my will ys that the sayde Katherine shall have and take my loomes aforesayde with all the stayes and other the pmisses to the craft of weavinge belonginge and alsoe the Cubbord table and forme aforesayde in full recompence of this my gifte of five poundes aforesayde for her porcon And concerninge my free landes aforesayde after the Eight yeares above specified after my deceasse be fully expired or imediatlye after my deceasse wifes deceasse if she dye before the eight yeares be ended my will is that my // overseers here under named their Executours Administrators or assignes shall have hold and enioye the yearely rent of my sayde free landes to them their Executors administrators and assignes untill the yearely rent thereof by them receaved be fullye sufficiente to paye unto my daughter Elizabeth five poundes of good and lawfull money of England And to my sonne Adam ffarmer ten poundes of like monye in maner and forme followinge That is to saye my will ys that my sayde ovseers their executors Administrators or assignes shall paye or cause to be payde unto my sayde daughter Elizabeth the five poundes aforesayde as sone as the yearely rentes of my sayde free landes by them receaved will be sufficiente to paye the same And after the paymentte thereof my will is likewise that my sayde overseers their Executors Administrators or assignes shall paye or cause to be payde the other tenne poundes to my sonne Adam or his assignes as sone as the yearely renttes of my freelandes is as aforesayde to be fully sufficiente to paye the somme likewise And after those my legaces geven out of my freelandes as aforesayde be fully pformed and payde my will is that my sonne Alexander shall have the sayde lande to him and his heyres forever But if anye of my sayde daughters Kathar[ine - end of name illegible] and Elizabethe doe dye before such tyme as they shall receave the severall giftes to them bequeathed then my will ys that the longest liver of them shall have and receave the pte or porcon which should be due to the deceassed at the tyme for the payment thereof as is aforesayde All the rest of my moveable goodes not geven and bequeathed (my dettes discharged my legaces pformed and my funerall expences discharged) // I geve wholy to my wyffe Margarie whome I make and ordayne my Executrix of this my laste will and testamente desiringe my neighbour John Staplye and my Brother in lawe Richard Co to be my trustye and faythfull overseers of this my last will to be aydinge helpinge and assistinge my said Executrix in the provinge of this my testament and to see that my legaces and geefts accordinge to my mynde herein declared fully pformed and discharged These beinge witnesses at the declaring hereof Thomas ffarmer Richard Co John Staplye and William Burges the writer hereof
Probate: granted 23rd May 1587 to
Margerie, relict and executor named in the will
(Transcribed by Claire Wickens, 24th February 2017 for Geoffrey Barber.)

Adam Farmer was buried on 18 April 1587 at St Denys, Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
In the transcription of the Rotherfield manorial court of 2 May 1587, there is an entry pertaining to the transfer of a messuage, barn and garden containing 1 acre from Adam Farmer to "Margt Farmer, his wife" and is an example of a so called "deathbed transfer". The deathbed transfer occured when a person near death instructed a manorial officer in the presence of witnesses regarding the disposal of his property on his death. Those present then attended the next manorial court meet to carry out the dying (or dead) tenants wishes. Essentially an oral will regarding customary property. A key point here is that the tenant was unable to attend court in person and that the actual transfer and payment of entry fines still occurred in the manorial court via surrender and admission thus protecting the lord’s financial interests.
At the court held 2 May 1587: Adam Farmer, out of court, viz. Apr 11, by John Nynne alias Barber, deputy of Isaac Alchorne, bedell, in presence of John Staple, Ric. Coe & Geo. Farmer, surrenders 1 messuage, 1 barn and 1 garden containing ½ acre on Townhyll in Rotherfield to use of Margaret Farmer his wife. [buried 18 April 1587 at Rotherfield]. Although, at first sight, not an obvious deathbed transfer, the words “out of court” are a giveaway and confirmation is given with the burial record from the church register. Note that the date of the out of court hearing (11 April) was the same day as the will was made.3
His estate was probated on 23 May 1587 at Archdeaconry of Lewes, Sussex, England.

Family

Margery Coe b. c 1545, d. 1615
Marriage
Adam Farmer married Margery Coe, daughter of (?) Coe, on 15 June 1569 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1 
Children

Citations

  1. [S24] Index to Marriages, 1538-1837, Compact Disc SFHGCD003, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, 2008.
  2. [S657] Will of Adam Farmer of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 11 April 1587, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 23 May 1587. (ESRO: PBT 1/1/8/11).
  3. [S441] Indexed translation of a court book of the manor of Rotherfield, 1587-1593 (ESRO: PAR 465/26/1/3) "p. 7 of PDF."

Henry Hodely

     Henry Hodely married Margery Coe, daughter of (?) Coe, on 6 November 1591 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England, Margery is a widow.1

Family

Margery Coe b. c 1545, d. 1615
Marriage*
Henry Hodely married Margery Coe, daughter of (?) Coe, on 6 November 1591 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England, Margery is a widow.1 
Child

Citations

  1. [S24] Index to Marriages, 1538-1837, Compact Disc SFHGCD003, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, 2008.

Denise Hodely

b. 1 February 1595/96
FatherHenry Hodely
MotherMargery Coe b. c 1545, d. 1615
     Denise Hodely was baptized on 1 February 1595/96 at St Denys, Rotherfield, Sussex, England. She was the daughter of Henry Hodely and Margery Coe.

John Lockyer

b. 5 September 1576, d. 1628
FatherJohn Lockyer d. 1596
MotherSylvester Farmer b. 12 Feb 1546
     John Lockyer was baptized on 5 September 1576 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1 He was the son of John Lockyer and Sylvester Farmer.
On 5 Dec 1625 John Lockyer was admitted to a number of properties in Rotherfield subsequent to the death of his uncle Adam Farmer.2
John Lockyer left a will made on circa 1627 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England: PCC: PROB 11/155/27.
John Lockyer died in 1628 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
John Lockyer was buried on 3 December 1628 at St Denys, Rotherfield, Sussex, England.3
His estate was probated on 14 January 1629 at Prerogative Court of Canterbury, London, England, PCC: PROB 11/155/27.

Citations

  1. [S23] Index to Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.
  2. [S463] Indexed translation of a court book of the manor of Rotherfield, 1616-1631 (ESRO: PAR 465/26/1/5).
  3. [S25] Index to Burials, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.

Jane Mitchell

b. 4 August 1805, d. after 1841
FatherJohn Mitchell b. 24 Jul 1768
MotherMary Bull b. 30 Apr 1775, d. 1814
     Jane Mitchell was baptized on 4 August 1805 at Fletching, Sussex, England.1 She was the daughter of John Mitchell and Mary Bull.
Jane Mitchell married Richard Teague on 3 April 1826 at Chailey, Sussex, England, both of Chailey. Witnesses: Lucy Norman and Thomas Smith.2 As of 3 April 1826, her married name was Teague.
On 7 June 1841 Jane Mitchell and Richard Teague lived at Newick Green, Newick, Sussex, England.3
Jane Mitchell died after 1841 at Newick, Sussex, England.3
Richard is a widower in the 1851 census.4

Family

Richard Teague b. c 1800, d. 1867
Marriage*
Jane Mitchell married Richard Teague on 3 April 1826 at Chailey, Sussex, England, both of Chailey. Witnesses: Lucy Norman and Thomas Smith.2 
Children

Citations

  1. [S23] Index to Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.
  2. [S24] Index to Marriages, 1538-1837, Compact Disc SFHGCD003, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, 2008.
  3. [S67] 1841 Census for England "Class: HO107; Piece: 1110; Book: 3; Civil Parish: Newick; County: Sussex; Enumeration District: 11; Page: 1; Line: 25; GSU roll: 464159."
  4. [S16] 1851 Census for England.