Mary Rootes

b. circa 1647, d. 1732
     Mary Rootes was born circa 1647.
Mary’s background is unknown. She may have been born in Chevening as there were certainly Rootes families living there, although there is no baptism for Mary. The only possible baptism found to date is at Fletching, Sussex on 2 November 1645, daughter of Robert Rootes Robert was baptised 26 November 1617 at Frant, Sussex,son of Richard Rootes and was buried in Fletching on 24 August 1672. If this is Mary’s father then his death may have prompted her marriage 2 months later. Robert’s father Richard Rootes became the vicar of Fletching (1619-1641) and was buried there on 20 June 1650. Thomas and Mary named their first child Richard.
Also of interest is a Thomas Rootes who was the longest serving headmaster at Tonbridge School (1668-1714). When he was admitted as a student in 1651 he was noted as being “son of a poor widow of Tonbridge”. There may be a connection given that a William Rootes, son of Richard Rootes of Fletching, Sussex, clerk (and therefore possibly Mary’s uncle) was admitted to the school in 1633. Although none of the Barbers ever attended Tonbridge School there is the possibility of some interesting connections.
The Hearth Tax Assessment of 1664 lists the following Rootes living in Tonbridge Town, some of which are likely to be Mary’s family:
Name                    No. of Hearths
M[aste]r Thomas Rootes          5
John Rootes               2
Richard Rootes the carry[er]          3
Richard Rootes at the Crowne     9
William Rootes               3
Elizabeth Rootes widd[ow]          4.1,2,3,4
Mary Rootes and Thomas Barber alias Nynne obtained a marriage licence on 11 October 1672 at Chevening, Kent, England.5
"11 Oct 1672 Thomas Barber alias Nin, of Tunbridge, Kent, Bachr, abt 30, & Mary Rootes, of the same, Spr, abt 25, at own disp; alleged by Edwd Clarke, of Cheevening, Kent, Dr of Divy; at Cheevening." There is a gap in the parish register for Chevening from June 1651 restarting in 1685. There are also no surviving Bishop's Transcripts so without this licence the marriage would have been lost.6
As of 11 October 1672, her married name was Barber alias Nynne.
The marriage allegation shows that Edward Clarke of Chevening, Doctor of Divinity, appeared personally (it doesn't say where but presumably at the Vicar-General's office in London) and alleged that Thomas Barber als Nin of Tunbridge [sic] aged about 30 years and a bachelor intended to marry Mary Rootes of the same parish aged about 25 years and a spinster “at her owne dispose” (meaning that she did not have to gain anyone's permission to marry) and that he did not know or believe there was any impediment to hinder the intended marriage. He asked for a licence for the parties to be married in the parish church of Chevening. A licence enabled the couple to marry without the calling of banns in their home parishes (which is the announcing of the intended marriage on three Sundays prior to the marriage). It is interesting to see that Clarke obtained the marriage licence rather than either Thomas or Mary having to travel (presumably to London) to obtain it, but maybe he had gone to the Vicar General's office on some other business.
We could speculate that Thomas and Mary married in Chevening either because Mary had family in the parish or because of connections to the church. If the latter, perhaps Edward Clarke, Doctor of Divinity, was a personal friend or they approved more of his religious stance and preaching than the current incumbent of Tonbridge parish church. On the other hand it may have been simply because Edward Clarke was able to obtain a marriage licence and that this enabled them to be married with a greater degree of privacy and speed.
Mary Rootes is mentioned in the will of Thomas Barber alias Nynne dated 28 October 1683 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.7
Mary was only about 36 years old when her husband Thomas died in 1683. She remained a widow for another 49 years and died at about 85 years of age. After Thomas's death Mary seems to have had the support of a legal representative or trustee (the Wellers?) judging by the number of documents which survive, most of which were deposited in the Tonbridge Library in the 1950s by the firm of solicitors Messrs. Walker, Templer and Thomson (the TU1 collection). Nearly all the documents refer to her as "Widow Barber". She appears to have made the best of her circumstances and was successful in raising a family which was able to take advantage of the prosperity and opportunities that Tonbridge offered in the 18th century.
Mary was the second of four consecutive generations of Barber wives who suffered the fate of being left a widow with a young family. She was left with three children; Richard aged about 10 years old, Thomas 8 years and Elizabeth 6 years. It is a testament to the strength of the women that they were able to preserve the family property for their children and that they continued to prosper despite their misfortune. The early deaths possibly explain why the men in the family were late to marry, as they were important to the family in working and providing for their widow mother and their brothers and sisters.
According to Thomas's will, Mary's major asset was the Draper's property in Rotherfield which she was able to lease and also, according to the will, to sell the timber thereon in the first 3 years after his death. Mary did not hesitate to use Drapers to secure an income for her family. Three months after Thomas died, in a document dated 29 January 1684, she leases the property to John Lockyer of Rotherfield for the sum of £6/10s per year for a period of 11 years. The document reads:
January 29th 1684
Mary Barber of Tonbridge widow
It is Agreed betwen Mr. Pauly and John Lockyer of Rotherfield for the Rentt of the Drapyers for John Lockyer to enter as Mickellmas Last and to Have A Leas for eleven yeares paying six pound & tenn shilling a yeare but Allso He the said John Lockyer is not to pay this Hallfe years Rent which is due between this Last Mich' and our Lady day but John Lockyer is to pay all the Taxes for this Hallfe yeare and so forwod: Allso he is to Have Ruftember [rough timber] for poostes and bars & gatts [gates] allso Six poosts to sett up for A Houfell [Hovel] or lodge and to leve itt Repaired & to Leve the Copises coppice] well fenced and A yeares groth : not for to plow Any ground for the Tarme [term] of the Leas and to Lop and to top All Trees which Have benn toped and no other and not to fill [fell] Any Timber nor timber tres and He is to pay for the first Hallf years Rennt betwene our ladiday and Mickellmas
To Leave 40 Tellowes [branches or shoots] more than now and [?] the [?]rerers.
[margin]
three pound and tenn shillings and to pay Six pound and tenn Shilling A yeare After and to pay the rent quarterly and not to lett or sett with out the Lanlords Consent.
[on reverse]
To lay the doung [dung] on the land and To leave A numbar of young tillows as shall bee agrid on when the Cops [coppice] is fillid [felled].
(Transcribed by Gillian Rickard for Geoffrey Barber, April 2014.)8
Mary was executor of her husband's will. A note dated 24 November 1684 from Anne Skeffington, lady of the manor of Datchurst (otherwise known as the manor of Hilden) states that the widow Barber has no debts owing to the manor. Although we do not know what prompted this statement it very much looks like the work of an executor of a will ensuring that all debts have been paid and would probably have been requested by whoever was assisting Mary. It could even support the view that Mary's husband worked for the Datchurst manor in which case they probably would have lived in accommodation provided by manor and so there was potential for a debt to arise. The statement reads:
Know all men by these presents that I Anne Skeffington of Tonbridge in ye county of Kent, widow, doe acknowledge myself to have received of Barber, widow full satisfaction of her for all rents, dues, debtes reckonings & demandes from the beginning of the World to the day of ye date of these presents. Wittnes my hand the 24th day of this instant November 1684. [signed] Anne Skeffington. [Anne Skeffington of Hanover House, Tonbridge. Lady of the Manor of Datchurst.]
(Transcription by an unknown person, forming part of the Tonbridge Library TU1/M2/1 collection)
Anne Skeffington's husband, Francis Skeffington, had died earlier on 30 April 1684, aged 77 years, and he gave by will £210 to purchase an annuity to provide twelve four-penny loaves of wheaten bread weekly to the poor of Tonbridge forever. Their daughter Mary married William Danvers, a name that appears later in some of the land holdings leased by Mary Barber.8
On 21st October 1691 Mary Barber became the owner of a small cottage in Hildenborough. Remarkably, the title that she received still survives; that is, a copy of the entry in the manorial court rolls which records her admission to the property. It is transcribed (from the Latin) below:
Datchurst
Court Baron held in the same place on Wednesday, the twenty first day of October in the one thousand six hundred and ninety first year of our Lord, by Thomas Weller, under steward in the same place.
To this Court came George Petley, gent, and George Hooper junior, gent, two of the customary tenants of this manor, and surrendered into the lord's hands, by the acceptance of the aforesaid steward,
One tenement or cottage, one barn and one orchard, and two roods of land by estimation, with the appurtenances, lying on the highway leading between Tonbridge and Sevenoaks towards the east and north, and the lands late of Francis Skeffington esquire towards the south, held by copy of the rolls of court, to the use and behoof of Mary Barber, widow, and her heirs.
And hereupon the aforesaid Mary comes, in her own person, and seeks to be admitted to the aforesaid tenements,
To which Mary, indeed, the lord of the aforesaid manor, through his aforesaid under-steward, granted seisin thereof by rod,
To have and to hold to the aforenamed Mary and her heirs, at the will of the lord, according to the custom of the manor, by copy of the rolls of court, by the rent and services formerly due and of right accustomed in respect thereof.
And she gives to the lord, as a fine, according to the custom etc.
Fine for the same 6d                         Thomas Weller, Steward
(Transcribed by Gillian Rickard for Geoffrey Barber, April 2014)
The property was purchased from George Petley (gentleman, died 1705) and George Hooper (a lawyer, or more accurately, a scrivener).
The names Petley, Hooper, Weller and Skeffington (and Children which appears on later Barber documents) denote important and wealthy families in Tonbridge society. George Petley, George Hooper, Thomas Weller (and a Richard Roots, Thomas Roots and William Roots - possible family connections to Mary) were at some time all Wardens of the Town Lands of Tonbridge, administering lands that had been gifted to the town. Some served as churchwardens - Francis Skeffington in 1678 and George Petley in 1682.8
Further information confirming Mary's purchase of the cottage survives in the records of the Overseers of the Poor who were responsible for the administration of poor relief such as money, food and clothing as part of the Poor Law system. The law required two Overseers to be elected every Easter, and churchwardens or landowners were often selected. The Tonbridge Overseers of the Poor Accounts (i.e. their expenses) for the period Easter 1691 to Easter 1692 include the following:
'Item paid for quit rent for the house sold to Wid Barber 1s 0d'.
Quit rent is an annual payment to the manor in lieu of services due to the manor. This entry throws up a question - why was the parish paying the quit rent for this house before it was sold to Mary Barber? Usually it was the individuals who held the property from the manor who paid, and not the parish. It suggests that the parish may have rented the property before it was sold to Widow Barber for use in housing the poor. Their accounts show they rented a number of properties for this purpose and were responsible for the expenses. Mary is unlikely to have been receiving parish relief herself given her income from the Drapers property in Rotherfield and that she was able to spend money improving the property after acquiring it.9
A receipt for work done for widow Barber on the cottage she purchased in 1691 still survives according to a book by Cope and Dash (2007):
March 19th 1692: Day work dun for the widow barber in Hildenborrow for whighting the old house William Dudson 2 dayes
Will Dudson 2 dayes
0 - 4 - 0
0 - 2 - 8
March 24th: Day for making the great oven and hanging the furnace and building the flew
William Dudson 4 dayes
Will Dudson 4 dayes
0 - 8 - 0
0 - 5 - 4
June 27th: Day for plaisering and whighting the walls of the old house and beame filling and meaning the wall of the barn
William Dudson 2 dayes and 3 quarters
Will Dudson 2 dayes and 3 quarters
For building a stack of chimneys of 4 fiors
0 - 5 - 6
0 - 3 - 8
2 - 10 - 0
The original document for this receipt has not been found despite extensive searching. However, there is no reason to doubt its authenticity. Cope and Dash (2007) state that this refers to Marden Cottages, now known as the Old House, a 15th century Grade II* listed property located on Philpots Lane at the intersection with Nizels Lane. However, research has proved that Mary Barber did not purchase Mardens and that this connection is therefore incorrect. Photographs of the fireplace taken in Sep 2016 from inside the house are shown here.10,11
The Tonbridge Overseers of the Poor rating assessments of 17 Oct 1692 includes the cottage owned by "Widdow Barber" and it was rated to pay 1 shilling and 6 pence (1s/6d). As the rate was 1s in the £1, her property must have been worth £1/10s per year in rent which is typical of a house rather than a farm. The year 1692 would coincide with her eldest son Richard coming of age (or thereabouts) and this may have had something to do with the purchase of the cottage.9
The Tonbridge Overseers of the Poor rating assessments of 16 Apr 1695 indicate that Mary Barber was occupying another property called "Mr Danvers'" as well as her own house. In the assessment of 21 Dec 1696 she is mentioned as the occupier of "Mr Danvers and Mr Richardson's land" but by 6 Jun 1697 the land is no longer being used by her and is assessed as "Mr Danvers and Mr Richardson's for land last used by Widow Barber". She may have been leasing this land to help her sons Richard and Thomas get established. We know that Thomas became a malster and that Richard had a farm in Hildenborough.9
The location of the property Mary purchased was identified by following the change of ownership through the Datchurst manorial records from 1691 to an entry on 2 September 1862 when Edward Peckham is admitted to the property presumably as heir to Thomas Peckham, the previous owner. The Tonbridge tithe map of 1838 identified the plot of land owned and occupied by Thomas Peckham, a wheelwright, as plot 652, just over 1 acre in size (1 acre, 1 rod and 8 perches). The property has been subdivided in modern times but the house survives at 99 Tonbridge Road, Hildenborough and is a Grade II listed building known as Woodside Cottage.12
In 1730 Mary Barber transferred her cottage in Hildenborough to her son Thomas. In the court book for the manors of Datchurst, Lamport, Martin Abbey and Nizells, 1718-1884, at the court on 13 October 1730, presented that Mary Barber, a customary tenant of the manor, was seised (ie had ownership) of a messuage or tenement, a garden and two orchards lying to the Kings highway from Tonbridge to Sevenoaks to the east and to the land late of Francis Skeffington to the south, at the yearly rent of 6d, and she devised (gave) the same to Thomas Barber [her son, 1675-1749]. This was less than two years before her death. The cottage was held by the Barber family until 1801.
In 1730, two years before her death, Mary Barber transferred her house in Hildenborough to Thomas, now her eldest surviving son. At the Datchurst, Lamport, Martin Abbey and Nizells manorial court held on 13 October 1730:
presented that Mary Barber, a customary tenant of the manor, was seised [i.e. had possession] of a messuage or tenement, a garden and two orchards lying to the Kings highway from Tonbridge to Sevenoaks to the east and to the land late of Francis Skeffington to the south, at the yearly rent of 6d, and she devised [gave] the same to Thomas Barber [her son, 1675-1749].
This is the entry from the actual manorial court roll while the copy that was given to Mary (with slightly different wording) also exists. She may have also transferred the freehold Drapers property in Rotherfield to him at this time. In any event, he would have inherited Drapers after her death in 1732.13,8
The description of the property in the above court roll mentions a "yearly rent of 6d" which is in fact called a Quit Rent and is payable to the lord of the manor. Two receipts for Quit Rent paid by Mary Barber survive - one for 1712 and another for 1717. The receipt states: "for lands near the Halfmoon" referring to the Half Moon Inn which still operates today.8
Mary Rootes died in 1732 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.
Mary Rootes was buried on 4 May 1732 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.

Family

Thomas Barber alias Nynne b. 3 May 1640, d. 1683
Marriage License*
Mary Rootes and Thomas Barber alias Nynne obtained a marriage licence on 11 October 1672 at Chevening, Kent, England.5 
Children

Citations

  1. [S537] Website "The Clergy of the Church of England Database 1540-1835 (CCEd)" (http://db.theclergydatabase.org.uk/jsp/persons/…).
  2. [S23] Index to Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.
  3. [S538] W.G. Hart, "The Register of Tonbridge School from 1553-1820", n.pub., First Edition (1933).
  4. [S539] Website "Kent Hearth Tax Assessment Lady Day 1664, Transcribed & Computerised by D. Harrington (1999) at Hearth Tax Online." (http://www.hearthtax.org.uk/).
  5. [S127] Unknown editor ed. "Harleian Society: Allegations for Marriage Licences Issued By The Vicar: General of The Archbishop of Canterbury, 1669 To 1679. Volume 34", The Harleian Society, First Edition (1892).
  6. [S132] Transcript of the Parish Register of Chevening, Kent, England, (KHLC: PAR 88/1/1/1).
  7. [S3] Will of Thomas Barber of Tonbridge, Kent, England, made 28 Oct 1683, proved in the Archdeaconry of Rochester, 14 Dec 1683. (KHLC: DRa/PW4).
  8. [S534] Various Papers of the manor of Datchurst alias Hilden, Kent, England, 1608-1808 (KHLC: TU1/M2/1).
  9. [S126] Tonbridge Overseers of the Poor Rating Assessments, 1670-. (KHLC: P371/12/1-4).
  10. [S540] Kay Cope and Joan Dash, "This is Hildenborough from A-Z", Hildenborough Parish Council, Revised Edition (2007) "p35."
  11. [S541] Geoffrey Barber, "History of the Old House (Originally Marden's Farm) in Hildenborough, Kent", 2014 (Tonbridge Library).", Geoffrey Barber, First Edition (2014) 978-0-9942112-2-4.
  12. [S741] Website "English Heritage" (http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/) "https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/…."
  13. [S410] Court books of the manor of Datchurst, Lamport, Martin Abbey and Nizells, in Kent, England, 1718-1884 (KHLC: U55 M378).

Thomas Barber alias Nynne

b. 1 January 1585, d. 1649
FatherGeorge Barber alias Nynne b. c 1558, d. 1627
MotherElizabeth Godsell b. 21 Dec 1561, d. 1638
Thomas Nynne alias Barber - churchwarden at Rotherfield, 1638.
     Thomas Barber alias Nynne was born in 1585 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
Thomas Barber alias Nynne was baptized on 1 January 1585 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England, as Thomas Nynne son of George Nynne alias Barber.1 He was the son of George Barber alias Nynne and Elizabeth Godsell.
Thomas Barber alias Nynne is mentioned in the will of Henry Aderoll alias Skinner dated 6 July 1612 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.2
The following document shows that Thomas farmed a property called Bearfields:
Title: Lease for 21 years at £12 a year from Rt Hon Henry Lord Bergevenny and Thomas Nevill, son and heir apparent, to John Weller of Rotherfield, yeoman, and Thomas Weller of Cliffords Inn, London, gent
Date: 24 Apr 1627 (ESRO: SAS/HC 541)
Description: 6 pieces called Bearefeilds of 40 acres in Rotherfield, in occupation of Thomas Poter, gent, Adam Farmer and Thomas Barber.
Thomas Barber alias Nynne is mentioned in the will of George Barber alias Nynne dated 18 January 1617 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.3
Thomas Barber alias Nynne was a yeoman (ESRO: SAS/CO 4/19) on 30 May 1627.
The foillowing document refers to Thomas's house in Rotherfield village (town):
Title: Settlement (covenant to stand seised)
Date: 30 May 1627. (ESRO: SAS/CO 4/19)
Description: Between William Chowne of Rotherfield, yeoman, to Thomas Markwick of Rotherfield, butcher and Thomas Barber of Rotherfield, yeoman, in trust for WC for life, remainder to Thomas Catt and his wife Margery Catt (WC's sister), remainder to their son Thomas Catt the younger
a messuage, barn, close, two garden plots and orchard in Rotherfield Town occupied by Thomas Catt (E: a messuage of Anthony Fowles, esquire; S: high street; W: messuage of TB; N: lands of TB and of John Aderoll)
Witnesses: William Thomas, Thomas Weller.

Thomas inherited the family properties at the age of 42 years following the death of his father, George, in 1627. We find this documented in the manorial court books:
24 Jul 1627: Steward: Tho Houghton, gt. Copy Admission of Tho Nynne als Barber, on death of his father Geo. Heriot: 1 Ox "color red branded". Unspecified land.4
One of the important tasks of the manorial court was to record the death of tenants in the court books, the name of their heir, and the name and description of their lands. The heir is thus "admitted" to the land. This entry also shows one of the interesting customs of the manor whereby upon the death of a tenant, the lord of the manor shall have his best animal in the name of a heriot (a feudal due). We would call it a death tax today! The heriot arose from an old custom whereby all men were bound to make a return on death of the “hergeat”, or war gear (horse, harness, weapons), which the lord had originally supplied and it was therefore right that he should resume possession on the man’s death. However, this concept became corrupted over time and evolved into yet another means of taxing the people.5
There is a later entry for the cottage known as Bonnetts and associated land called Bachelands: 11 Oct 1627: Steward: Tho Houghton, gt. Admission of Tho Nynne als Barber, eldest son of Geo N.als B., on his father's death. Mes & gdn at Retherfield Hill, of 1 rod, & a barn called Bonnetts, with a Way from sd mes to the barn; Also a gdn of 1 rod called Bacheland next to sd barn; Also a pcl meadow of 1/2 ac, a Kitchen (coquinam) once of Alice Adowne, & a gdn once of Adam Farmer. The Latin word "coquinam" is in the original document meaning "pertaining to cooks/cooking", which has been translated in this context to mean kitchen.6
The following document refers to Bearfields:
Title: Lease of Bearefeilds for £10 for lives at £12 a year from Henry Lord Bergevenny to John Weller of Rotherfield, yeoman, and brother Thomas Weller
Date: 10 Aug 1629. (ESRO: SAS/HC 544)
Description: premises as in SAS/HC 541, now described as 24 acres in occupation of Adam Farmer, Thomas Barber and Arthur Catt; term: for the longest life of John Weller, Thomas Weller and their brother Stephen Weller;
witnesses to deed: Abraham Newport, John Marshalshay; to livery of seisin: Edmund Latter, William Allen.

As a free tenant, Thomas had responsibilities to the manor. In 1628 he was a surety for Southborough and at various times between 1631 and 1633 served as one of the jury in the manorial court. The sworn jury decided on the fines payable for offenses, appointed the officers of the manor and heard the cases against miscreant tenants. He is no longer mentioned in the court books after 1635 although he appears again as a witness in 1648.7
Title: Lease for lives of Bearefeilds at £12 a year from Henry Lord Bergevenny to Thomas Weller the elder of Rotherfield, gent, and wife Elizabeth
Date: 20 Nov 1633. (ESRO: SAS/HC 549)
Description: premises described in SAS/HC 541; in occupation of John Latter, Thomas Barber and Adam Farmer; term: longest life of Thomas and Elizabeth and son Thomas Weller the younger;
witnesses to livery of seisin: Thomas Barton, attorney of Lord Bergevenny, Nicholas Wheler, Adam Austen, Margaret Barton (mark.)

On 14 May 1637, Thomas Barber alias Nynne was appointed a churchwarden at Rotherfield St Denys.8,9
Thomas Barber alias Nynne is mentioned in the will of Elizabeth Godsell dated 12 September 1637 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.10
Thomas Barber alias Nynne and Anne Latter obtained a marriage licence on 26 February 1639.11 Thomas Barber's mother Elizabeth was buried on 31 October 1638 and four months later, on 26 February 1639, Thomas and the widow Anne Heath (nee Latter) obtained a marriage licence. He was 54 years of age and Anne was a widow aged 30 years. The marriage licence reads: "Thomas Barber alias Nyn of Rotherfield, yeoman, & Anne Heath of same, widow, sureties: said T.B. alias N. and William Bowden of same, yeoman (Frant)". The witness William Bowden is a person of interest as the will of Elizabeth Nynne als Barber 1637 states her daughter's name as Elizabeth Bowden and so it is likely that William is her husband and therefore Thomas' brother-in-law. This is confirmation that this is the marriage of Thomas, son of George and Elizabeth Barber alias Nynne.
Thomas Barber alias Nynne married Anne Latter, daughter of Edmund Latter and Agnes A'Downe, on 7 March 1639 at Frant, Sussex, England, The church register simply states: Thomas Barber of Rotherfield & Anne Heath (widdow).12
Anne's previous husband, William Heath,had died in 1635 and at the time she married Thomas she had three young children: Edmond 8 years, Elizabeth 5 years and Robert 4 years. It has proved difficult to trace these children, although the baptism of Thomas Heath on 27 January 1673 at Tonbridge, son of Robert Heath (mother not named), may show that at least Robert survived and followed his mother to Tonbridge. This may also be the Robert Heath who married Dorothy Latter (his mother’s maiden name!) on 24 October 1668 in Horsmonden.13
It is interesting that Thomas did not marry until 4 months after Elizabeth’s death suggesting that she had played a major role in the household. An unmarried son inheriting such a house/cottage would be very much in need of a woman to run it which may explain why Thomas, a 54 year old, was quick to marry a 30 year old widow after his mother died. These were times when love was not necessarily the main factor in a marriage! Also, three years after Elizabeth’s death, Thomas’ unmarried sister Frances at age 52 years was moved to marry Abednego Breade, a widower, on 11 Mar 1640/41 at Rotherfield! Elizabeth's death certainly caused a major upheaval in the family.
The following shows the close relationship between Thomas Barber and the Latter family:
Title: Grant (indented) for 98
Date: 5 Sep 1639. (ESRO: SAS/AB/401)
Description: Stephen Baker to John Latter messuage in town of Rotherfield, with barns, buildings, closes, gardens, etc, belonging (S: High Street; W: messuage and garden of Nicholas Fowle, gent; N and E: messuage and lands of Thomas Barber) in tenure of Thomas Latter (one acre) the messuage formerly of Nicholas Alchorne and conveyed by him to Jane Fowle, and by Jane Fowle to John Baker, and by John Baker to Stephen Baker.
The records for the “Relief of Irish Protestants 1642 – East Sussex Contributors” show two Thomas Barber’s in Rotherfield:
Thomas Barber 1s
Thomas Barber 2d
John Barber 1d
The second Thomas Barber is most likely baptised at Burwash on 15 Apr 1610 "son of William Barber of Tishurst" and who married Johan (Joan) Primer at Ticehurst on 4 Feb 1638 and was buried in Rotherfield on 10 Apr 1663. The likely parents of this Thomas Barber are William Barber and Elizabeth Fuller who were married in Ticehurst on 21 Aug 1609. William Barber is a descendant of the Richard Nynne alias Barber of Ticehurst.14,15
Thomas Barber alias Nynne died in 1649 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
Thomas Barber alias Nynne was buried on 21 May 1649 at St Denys, Rotherfield, Sussex, England, aged 64 years.1
Thirty years later, on 19 July 1679, the churchwardens' accounts note the sale of a seat in the church by Edmund Latter to John Cheeseman the Elder, noting that the seat was previously owned by "Thomas Barbar". Edmund would likely have obtained the seat from Thomas’ widow, Anne (nee Latter), who was probably his sister.16,17

Family

Anne Latter b. 11 Dec 1608, d. c 1675
Marriage License
Thomas Barber alias Nynne and Anne Latter obtained a marriage licence on 26 February 1639.11 
Marriage*
Thomas Barber alias Nynne married Anne Latter, daughter of Edmund Latter and Agnes A'Downe, on 7 March 1639 at Frant, Sussex, England, The church register simply states: Thomas Barber of Rotherfield & Anne Heath (widdow).12  
Children

Citations

  1. [S103] Transcript of the Parish Register of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, (ESRO: PAR 465/1/1/1).
  2. [S361] Will of Henry Aderoll alias Skynner of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 6 Jul 1612, proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 2 Nov 1613. (TNA: PROB 11/122/389).
  3. [S113] Will of George Nynne als Barber of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 18 Jan 1617, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 26 May 1627. (ESRO: PBT/1/1/20/40A).
  4. [S120] Transcription of Thomas Nynne als Barber Admission, 24 Jul 1627. (ESRO SAS AB 397).
  5. [S138] H.S. Bennett, "Life on the English Manor 1150-1400", Cambridge University Press, First Edition (1937) "pages 143,144."
  6. [S121] Transcription of Thomas Nynne als Barber Admission, 11 Oct 1627. (ESRO: SAS AB 398).
  7. [S107] CourtRolls of the manor of Rotherfield, 1631-1753 (ESRO: ABE 74O1).
  8. [S104] Catharine Pullein, "Rotherfield: The Story of Some Wealden Manors", Courier, First Edition (1928) "page 225."
  9. [S108] Churchwardens' account book for Rotherfield, 1510-1675. (ESRO: PAR 465/10/3/1) page 101.
  10. [S114] Will of Elizabeth Nyne als Barber of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 12 Sep 1637, proved in the Archdeaconry Court at Lewes, 3 Dec 1638. (ESRO: PBT/1/1/25/189).
  11. [S115] Edwin H W Dunkin ed. "Sussex Record Society Vol 1: Calendar of Sussex Marriage Licences: Archdeaconry of Lewes 1586-1643", Sussex Record Society, First Edition (1901).
  12. [S122] Transcript of the Parish Register of Frant, Sussex, England, 1544-1881 (ESRO: PAR 344/1).
  13. [S125] Will of William Heath of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 4 Aug 1635, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 28 Apr 1636. (ESRO: PBT/1/1/24/84B).
  14. [S109] Transcript of the Parish Register of Burwash, Sussex, England, (ESRO: PAR 285/1).
  15. [S110] M J Burchall ed. "East Sussex Contributors to the relief of Irish Protestants 1642", Sussex Genealogical Centre, Occasional Paper No 10, First Edition (1984).
  16. [S108] Churchwardens' account book for Rotherfield, 1510-1675. (ESRO: PAR 465/10/3/1) page 118.
  17. [S104] Catharine Pullein, "Rotherfield: The Story of Some Wealden Manors", Courier, First Edition (1928) "page 252."

Anne Latter

b. 11 December 1608, d. circa 1675
FatherEdmund Latter b. c 1575, d. 1656
MotherAgnes A'Downe b. 19 Nov 1570
     Anne Latter was born in 1608 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
Anne Latter was baptized on 11 December 1608 at St Denys, Rotherfield, Sussex, England, daughter of Edmond Latter and Agnes (nee A'Downe). A'Downe/Downe is another old Rotherfield name with a Johe [John] atte Doune listed for Rotherfield in the Sussex subsidy (tax) of 1327.1,2 She was the daughter of Edmund Latter and Agnes A'Downe.
It is likely that Anne was born and grew up in the house known as Salters on Packham’s Hill in Rotherfield. Catherine Pullein states that Thomas Catt surrendered a messuage (house) and five acres called Salters to Edmund Latter and his heirs in September 1595 and that it passed down the family to John Latter who held it until 1685. She says that the position of the property was such that it lay on either side of the Station Road at Packham's Hill, each portion containing a narrow strip of land. When Pullein published her book in 1928 there was only one house on each portion and she speculated that the house on the south side of the road is older and therefore Salters. However, the house on the north side of the road is known as Salters today, so which one is correct is open to debate. Pullein also speculates that the property owes its name to a vendor of salt, William Le Selterre, who is mentioned in tax records in 1296.3
Anne's first marriage was to William Heath of Frant. Anne Latter and William Heath obtained a marriage license on 4 May 1630 at Archdeaconry of Lewes, Sussex, England, "William Heath of Fraunt, warriner, and Anne Latter of Retherfield, maiden: sureties, said W.H. and Thomas Foster of Clive near Lewes, inholder (St Mary Westout, Lewes)." Note that an inholder is an innkeeper. William gives his occupation as a warriner, which is a game or forest warden.4
Anne Latter married William Heath on 4 May 1630 at St Mary Westout, Lewes, Sussex, England, (St Mary Westout is now called St Anne's).5
As of 4 May 1630, her married name was Heath.
At the Rotherfield manorial court held on 6 April 1835:
"Comes William Heath and surrenders 1 cottage and 2 pieces of land adjacent, situated in the parish of Frant on the E. side of Eridge Parke between the fence of the said Parke & the highway there, formerly in occupation of Mark Couchman, besides all right estate claim & demand which the said Wm has in the premises for & during his life & the lives of Edward Munday & Margarite Heath, with intent that the lord shall re-grant the said cottage & premises as before mentioned And thereupon he at this court grants seisin by the lord to Richard Boakes senr, Richard Boakes his son & Anne Boakes his daughter of & in the cottage & 2 pieces of land to have & to hold the same to him R.B. snr & R.B. the son & A.B. & their assigns for & during their natural lives & of the .......? of them & the paying yealy to the lord & his heirs at the capital mess[uage] called Eridge Place 2 fat capons [a rooster or cockerel that has been castrated to improve the quality of its flesh for food ]or 3/- lawful English money. Heriot 3/- Fini £3.6"
The above entry in the manorial records raises the question as to who were Edward Munday and Margaret Heath? Intriguingly, there is a baptism of a Margaret Heath to a William Heath in November 1629 at St John the Baptist, Lewes. Unfortunately the mother's name is not given.
Anne Latter is mentioned in the will of William Heath dated 4 August 1635 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.7
William Heath died and was buried on 25 Oct 1635. William left the following will: ‘In the name of god amen I William Heath of Rotherfeild in the Countie of Sussex yeoman being of pfect memorie doe this fourth daie of August in the Eleventh yeere of the Raigne of our soveraigne Charles [1635] by the grace of god Kinge of England Scotland France & Ireland defender of the faith &c make & declare this my last will and teastam’t in manner & forme following Inprimis I give [& devise – crossed out] my soule to god my Creator my bodie I will shalbe buried in the earth. Itm I give & devise unto my three Children Edmond Heath Robert Heath & Elizabeth Heath five pounds apeece to be paid to them at their sev’rall ages of one & twentie yeeres or daies of marriage wch shall first happen All the rest of my goods cattells [capital] & chattells whatsoever I give & devise unto Anne my loveing wife & I make & ordeine my said loveing wife sole executrix of this my last will & teastament In wittnes whereof I have hereunto sett my hand & seale the daie & yeare first abovewritten.
[signed] Willm Heath.
Wittnes unto his will
Nicholas Jeames
Thomas Weller jun.’
[Latin] Probate 28 April 1636 on the oath of Anne Heath, the relict of the said deceased and Executrix.7

Anne Latter and Thomas Barber alias Nynne obtained a marriage licence on 26 February 1639.4
Thomas Barber's mother Elizabeth was buried on 31 October 1638 and four months later, on 26 February 1639, Thomas and the widow Anne Heath (nee Latter) obtained a marriage licence. He was 54 years of age and Anne was a widow aged 30 years. The marriage licence reads: "Thomas Barber alias Nyn of Rotherfield, yeoman, & Anne Heath of same, widow, sureties: said T.B. alias N. and William Bowden of same, yeoman (Frant)". The witness William Bowden is a person of interest as the will of Elizabeth Nynne als Barber 1637 states her daughter's name as Elizabeth Bowden and so it is likely that William is her husband and therefore Thomas' brother-in-law. This is confirmation that this is the marriage of Thomas, son of George and Elizabeth Barber alias Nynne.
As of 26 February 1639, her married name was Barber alias Nynne.
Anne Latter married Thomas Barber alias Nynne, son of George Barber alias Nynne and Elizabeth Godsell, on 7 March 1639 at Frant, Sussex, England, The church register simply states: Thomas Barber of Rotherfield & Anne Heath (widdow).8
Anne's second husband, Thomas Barber, died and was buried on 21 May 1649 in Rotherfield. She was again left with three young children from the marriage: Thomas aged 9 years, Elizabeth 6 years and Anne 4 years.
Anne Latter is mentioned in the will of Edmund Latter dated 20 January 1654/55 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.9
In 1655, Anne's father Edmond Latter, died in Tonbridge. He left Anne twenty shillings in his will: ‘In the name of God Amen The twentieth day of January in the yeare of our Lord God one thousand sixe hundred fiftye and fower I Edmund Latter of Tonbridge in the County of Kent yeoman beinge at this present weake in bodye but of perfect and sounde memorie praised be God doe make and declare this to be my Testament and last will in manner and forme followinge First I will and resigne my soule to God that gave it And my bodie I commit to the earth hopeinge to have a ioyfull resurrection thereof to eternall life by my Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ And for that temporall estate which God hath lent me I will and dispose of the same as followeth (that is to saie) I will to Alice my daughter wife to Henry Marten Twenty shillinges of lawfull English money And to the said Henry Marten I give all my wearinge apparell whatsoever to be paid and delivered unto them upon their reasonable demannd by myne Executrix Alsoe I will and give to Robert Martyn sonne of the said Alice my daughter the sume of five poundes of lawfull English money to be paid unto him within one yeare next after my decease by mine Executrix Alsoe I will and give to Anne my daughter in remembrance of her Twentye shillinges to be paid unto her upon her demannd thereof Alsoe I will and give to Edmund Latter my grandchild sonne of John Latter my sonne deceased the sume of five poundes of lawfull money (of England) to be paid unto him at his age of one and twentie yeares if he shall live to attaine that age by mine Executrix. Alsoe I will and give to John Latter my grandchild sonne of the said John my sonne deceased the like summe of five poundes of lawfull money To be paid unto him at his age of one andTwentie yeares if he shall live to attaine that age by mine Executrix. Alsoe I will and give to Richard Latter my brother my redd cowe to be delivered to him by myne executrix w’thin short tyme after my decease. Alsoe I will and give to my godson John Moyse Tenne shillinges to be paid unto him at his age of one and twentie yeares if he live to attaine that age by myne Executrix. Alsoe all my moveable goodes Cattle [capital] houshold stuffe readie money debtes and chattles whatsoever and of what nature or kinde soever I wholie give leave and bequeath to Anne my deare and loveinge wife to enable her to pay my debts and legacies and to recompence her love and great paines by her shewed towards me And I make and ordeine the said Anne my wife to be the full and sole Executrix of this my Testament and last will In wittnes whereof I the said Edmund Latter have to this my Testament and last will sett my hand and seale the day and yeare first above written. Edmund Latter. Read, sealed, published and declared by the said Edmund Latter to be his Testament and last will in the presence of Robert Weare, William Moyse his marke, Geo: Hooper.
This will was proved at London before the Judges for probate of wills and grannting administracons lawfullie authorized the second day of January in the yeare of our Lord God one thousand sixe hundred and fiftye sixe by the oathe of Anne Latter the Relict and sole Executrix named in the last will and Testament of the said deceased To whome was grannted administracon &c she beinge by vertue of a Commission first legally sworne truely and faithfully to administer.’
(Transcribed by Gillian Rickard for Geoffrey Barber, 2011.)9
Anne’s sister Alice is mentioned in the above will as being married to Henry Marten which helped to confirm the link to Rotherfield, as Alice Latter married Henry Martin in Rotherfield on 26 January 1624.10
Anne Latter married Samuel Theobold circa 1660 at England.11
As of circa 1660, her married name was Theobold.
Anne’s third marriage was to a clothier, Samuel Theobold, sometime between 1650 and 1661. Although the marriage record has not been found, we know it occurred because on 7 Jan 1661/62 Anne's son Thomas Barber leases the cottage in Rotherfield Town and the Drapers land from Ann and her third husband, Samuel Theobold, who were occupying it: "7 Jan 1661/62 Lease by Samuel Theobold of Tonbridge, Kent, clothier and Ann his wife, to Thomas Barber alias Nine, of Frant, Sussex, then servant to Thomas Weller, gent., of a messuage or tenement, outhouse, barn and stall and a small piece of land lying near the said barn, together with all gardens, closes, backside, etc. in Rotherfield Town. Also, 4 pieces of land and wood containing 22 acres, called Drapyers in Rotherfield; all which premises the said Samuel held by right of An his wife made to her by jointure and lease from Thomas Barber alias Nine, her former husband, father of the above named Thomas. Term, the life of the said Ann Theobold party to the deed and mother of the said Thomas: rent yearly 11 pounds/5s. Signature of Samuel Theobold, and mark of Ann Theobold & seals. Witnesses: William Jeffrey, Ann Barber (mk)".12
This implies that Thomas Barber senior must have arranged a formal lease of all his properties to Ann for her lifetime. This was a common practice, often agreed prior to marriage and referred to as a marriage settlement, to ensure that Ann would have the use and control of her husband’s property in the event of his death. She could use the properties to derive an income to provide for her and their children for as long as was needed. It also ensured that neither Anne nor any future husband of Anne could sell the property, and so preserved it for their children’s inheritance. In this case, Samuel and Anne arranged to sub lease the properties to Thomas junior when he was 21 years old, for an annual rent of £11/5s. In doing so, Anne and Samuel received an income and Thomas got his property. On Anne’s death the property would automatically transfer to Thomas as heir.
The witnesses to the above lease were William Jeffery and Ann Barber. Ann is most certainly the daughter of Anne Theobold (from her marriage to Thomas Barber) and William Jeffery is very likely to be the husband of her other daughter, Elizabeth. Although the marriage of William Jeffery and Elizabeth Barber has not been found, there are a number of baptisms in Tonbridge to William Jeffrey (unfortunately the mother’s name is not given) starting in 1661 suggesting a marriage c1660. The children’s names match the Barber family very closely: Anne (1661), Mary (1665), John (1673), William (1677), Thomas (1679), Mary (1680), and George (1683). To confuse matters, there is an Elizabeth Barber in the next generation (bap. 1677, daughter of Thomas and Mary Barber) who marries a William Jeffery in 1705 at Tonbridge.
It appears that Samuel and Anne lived in Tonbridge for the remainder of their life. The lease of 1661/62 states that Samuel Theobold is “of Tonbridge”, and there is another document dated 24 January 1670/71 in which Samuel Theobald, "of Tonbridge, yeoman", releases his step-daughter Anne Barber, spinster, from any obligation to him. This is clearly indicating a separation of affairs between Samuel and Anne Barber, but we do not know the circumstances behind it (was Anne about to be married?). The fact that this document ended up with Mary Barber's papers (wife of Anne's brother Thomas) indicates that the unmarried Anne Barber was still in touch with her brother (who was also unmarried at this time) and that perhaps he was assisting her in this matter. The document is transcribed below:
Knowe all men by these presents that I Samuell Theobald of Tonbridge in the county of Kent yeoman for good causes and considerations me hereunto moveing Have remised released and for ever quiteclaymed and by these presents doe fully cleerly and absolutely for and from me mine executors and adm[ini]strators remise releas and for ever quiteclaime unto Anne Barbar of Tonbridge aforsaid Spinster her heires executors and adm[ini]strators all and all manner of accons causes of accons sutes Controversies bonds obligations bills debts duties recconings accompts defamations wrongs assaults trepasses and demands whatsoever which I the said Samuell Theobald mine Executors adm[ini]strators or assignes have had may might could or ought to have of from or against the said Anne Barbar her heires executors or adm[ini]strators for any cause question matter or thing whatsoever from the beginning of the world until the day of the date of these presents In witnes whereof I the said Samuell Theobald have to this my present writing sett my hand and seale the fower and Twenteth day of January In the Two and Twenteth yeare of the Reigne of our sovereigne Lord Charles the second by the grace of God King of England Scotland France & Ireland defender of the faith &c Anno d[omi]ni 1670
Sealed and delivered in the
p[resen]nce of Geo. Hooper: &
Richard Polhill
Samuel Theobald.
(Transcribed by Gillian Rickard for Geoffrey Barber, April 2014.)13,11

Anne Latter died circa 1675 at Kent, England.
Anne Theobald’s burial record has not been found, but there are pages missing in the Tonbridge burial register between 29 May 1673 and 7 March 1680 so she probably died during this time. She almost certainly died before 6 December 1677 when there is a manorial record of a transfer of the Bonnetts and Bathelands properties from her son Thomas Barber to Edmund Latter. These are the properties in Rotherfield village that were first held by John Barber alias Nynne in 1530 and which were held by Anne for life (as noted in the lease of 1661/62). Her son Thomas had married in 1672 and was now living in Hildenborough (near Tonbridge) so the house in Rotherfield village was no longer required. However, he continued to hold the Drapers property as it would have been able to provide a valuable source of income.14

Family 1

William Heath d. Oct 1635
Marriage LicenseShe and William Heath obtained a marriage license on 4 May 1630 at Archdeaconry of Lewes, Sussex, England, "William Heath of Fraunt, warriner, and Anne Latter of Retherfield, maiden: sureties, said W.H. and Thomas Foster of Clive near Lewes, inholder (St Mary Westout, Lewes)." Note that an inholder is an innkeeper. William gives his occupation as a warriner, which is a game or forest warden.4 
Marriage
Anne Latter married William Heath on 4 May 1630 at St Mary Westout, Lewes, Sussex, England, (St Mary Westout is now called St Anne's).5 
Children

Family 2

Thomas Barber alias Nynne b. 1 Jan 1585, d. 1649
Marriage License
Anne Latter and Thomas Barber alias Nynne obtained a marriage licence on 26 February 1639.4 
Marriage
Anne Latter married Thomas Barber alias Nynne, son of George Barber alias Nynne and Elizabeth Godsell, on 7 March 1639 at Frant, Sussex, England, The church register simply states: Thomas Barber of Rotherfield & Anne Heath (widdow).8  
Children

Family 3

Samuel Theobold
Marriage*
Anne Latter married Samuel Theobold circa 1660 at England.11 

Citations

  1. [S533] Webpage "Sussex Subsidy of 1327: The rape of Pevensey', The three earliest subsidies for the county of Sussex: 1296, 1327, 1332 (1910)" (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65854).
  2. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) ""England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N29D-R5J : 11 February 2018, Anne Latter, 11 Dec 1608); citing , index based upon data collected by the Genealogical Society of Utah, Salt Lake City; FHL microfilm 1,067,279."
  3. [S104] Catharine Pullein, "Rotherfield: The Story of Some Wealden Manors", Courier, First Edition (1928) "p303."
  4. [S115] Edwin H W Dunkin ed. "Sussex Record Society Vol 1: Calendar of Sussex Marriage Licences: Archdeaconry of Lewes 1586-1643", Sussex Record Society, First Edition (1901).
  5. [S123] Transcript of the Bishop's Transcripts of Lewes St Mary Westout, Sussex, England, (ESRO: PAR 411/1).
  6. [S464] Indexed translation of a court book of the manor of Rotherfield, 1631-1724 (ESRO: PAR 465/26/1/6) "p. 13b (pp. 18,19 of PDF)."
  7. [S125] Will of William Heath of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 4 Aug 1635, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 28 Apr 1636. (ESRO: PBT/1/1/24/84B).
  8. [S122] Transcript of the Parish Register of Frant, Sussex, England, 1544-1881 (ESRO: PAR 344/1).
  9. [S135] Will of Edmund Latter of Tonbridge, Kent, England, made 20 Jan 1654, proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 2 Jan 1656. (TNA: PROB 11/261/251).
  10. [S24] Index to Marriages, 1538-1837, Compact Disc SFHGCD003, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, 2008.
  11. [S117] Transcription of Theobold/Barber alias Nine Lease, 7 Jan 1661/2. (ESRO SAS FA 781).
  12. [S117] Transcription of Theobold/Barber alias Nine Lease, 7 Jan 1661/2. (ESRO SAS FA 781) SAS FA 781.
  13. [S590] Release Declaration, Samuel Theobold-Ann Barber 1670/71 (Collection of the solicitors Messrs. Walker, Templer and Thomson of Tonbridge), 24 Jan 1670/71. (KHLC: TU1/M2/1).
  14. [S107] CourtRolls of the manor of Rotherfield, 1631-1753 (ESRO: ABE 74O1) page 252.

Elizabeth Barber alias Nynne

b. 11 September 1642
FatherThomas Barber alias Nynne b. 1 Jan 1585, d. 1649
MotherAnne Latter b. 11 Dec 1608, d. c 1675
     Elizabeth Barber alias Nynne was baptized on 11 September 1642 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1 She was the daughter of Thomas Barber alias Nynne and Anne Latter.

Citations

  1. [S23] Index to Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.

Anne Barber alias Nynne

b. 16 February 1644/45
FatherThomas Barber alias Nynne b. 1 Jan 1585, d. 1649
MotherAnne Latter b. 11 Dec 1608, d. c 1675
     Anne Barber alias Nynne was baptized on 16 February 1644/45 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1 She was the daughter of Thomas Barber alias Nynne and Anne Latter.
There is a document dated 24 January 1670/71 in which Samuel Theobald, "of Tonbridge, yeoman", releases his step-daughter Anne Barber, spinster, from any obligation to him. This is clearly indicating a separation of affairs between Samuel and Anne Barber, but we do not know the circumstances behind it (was Anne about to be married?). The fact that this document ended up with Mary Barber's papers (wife of Anne's brother Thomas) indicates that the unmarried Anne Barber was still in touch with her brother (who was also unmarried at this time) and that perhaps he was assisting her in this matter. The document is transcribed below:
Knowe all men by these presents that I Samuell Theobald of Tonbridge in the county of Kent yeoman for good causes and considerations me hereunto moveing Have remised released and for ever quiteclaymed and by these presents doe fully cleerly and absolutely for and from me mine executors and adm[ini]strators remise releas and for ever quiteclaime unto Anne Barbar of Tonbridge aforsaid Spinster her heires executors and adm[ini]strators all and all manner of accons causes of accons sutes Controversies bonds obligations bills debts duties recconings accompts defamations wrongs assaults trepasses and demands whatsoever which I the said Samuell Theobald mine Executors adm[ini]strators or assignes have had may might could or ought to have of from or against the said Anne Barbar her heires executors or adm[ini]strators for any cause question matter or thing whatsoever from the beginning of the world until the day of the date of these presents In witnes whereof I the said Samuell Theobald have to this my present writing sett my hand and seale the fower and Twenteth day of January In the Two and Twenteth yeare of the Reigne of our sovereigne Lord Charles the second by the grace of God King of England Scotland France & Ireland defender of the faith &c Anno d[omi]ni 1670
Sealed and delivered in the
p[resen]nce of Geo. Hooper: &
Richard Polhill
Samuel Theobald.
(Transcribed by Gillian Rickard for Geoffrey Barber, April 2014.)2

Citations

  1. [S23] Index to Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.
  2. [S590] Release Declaration, Samuel Theobold-Ann Barber 1670/71 (Collection of the solicitors Messrs. Walker, Templer and Thomson of Tonbridge), 24 Jan 1670/71. (KHLC: TU1/M2/1).

George Barber alias Nynne

b. circa 1558, d. 1627
FatherJohn Barber alias Nynne b. c 1530, d. 1591
MotherAlice Farmer b. c 1530, d. 1595
George Barber's property called Drapers on the 1597 map of Rotherfield (ESRO: ACC 0363-111R).
     George Barber alias Nynne was born circa 1558 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England; probably. He was the son of John Barber alias Nynne and Alice Farmer.
George Barber alias Nynne married Elizabeth Godsell, daughter of Richard Godsell, on 2 December 1582 at Hadlow, Kent, England.1
The only possibility for their marriage was found at Hadlow in Kent and although this has been shown above it should not be treated as certain. Subsequent research found Elizabeth Godsell (or Gutsold/Gutsall) baptised 21 Dec 1561 at Brenchley in Kent, daughter of Richard Gutsold/Gutsall.
There is circumstantial evidence for supporting this marriage being the correct one. Their daughter, Elizabeth married William Bowden in 1622 in Horsmonden, Kent which is a village next to Brenchley i.e. in the area where her mother may have been born. In addition there are many Godsell/Gudsell/Gotsole/Gutsall baptisms in Frant and Ticehurst from 1605 onwards. If this is correct, it highlights that they used the surname Barber outside of Rotherfield, and not Nynne, which could indicate that Barber was their real surname, and Nynne just an alias.
Also, there is a gap between their marriage in 1582 and their first known child, Thomas, in 1585. Could there have been an earlier child (named George?) baptised elsewhere and who later died?2
At the manorial court of 2 May 1587, George Nynne alias Barber is listed as one of the "Sureties", and is "for south borgh sworn" (south borgh is also known as southborough or south township). He is recorded as "George Nynne, surety presents that John Butcher junior & Ralph Barre living in the south township have (illegible) to the hurt of the Queen's highway by the fault of Abraham Butcher, & have a day given to scour, under pain of 3s 4d."3
This is a good example of the responsibilities of the headborough where they were appointed by the manorial court and held responsible for the good behaviour of a group of people (for the south township in George's case). They brought matters to the court for judgement, which in the above case resulted in an order to scour the road or be fined 3s 4d. The position was held for a period of time and then someone else in the area was appointed. This method of keeping law and order goes back to early Saxon times.
George Barber alias Nynne is mentioned in the will of John Barber alias Nynne dated 10 April 1589 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.4
Following the burial of his father on 15 May 1591, the manorial court of 23 Sep 1591 records: "Comes George Nynne (makes homag that he?) holds of the lord certain lands called Drapers cont. 22 1/2 ac. by rent of 22 1/2d", of which John Nynne his father died seised". and also on the same date: "Comes George Nynne & prays 1 mes. with garden on R. hyll cont. 1 rod & 1 barn formerly called Bennetts with a road to the sd mes. & barn & a garden cont. 1 rod called Bacheland near the sd barn & a parcel of meadow cont. 1/2 ac. & 1 kitchen formerly Alice Adowne's & 1 garden formerly Adam Farmer's of which John N. his father died siesed".
These entries are recording the transfer of the two properties called Bonnetts/Bennetts and Drapers to George subsequent to the death of his father. The first is more a notification to the lord of the manor (to whom George will have to pay a rent), as Drapers is held freehold and its transfer or inheritance is not subject to the manorial court. However Bonnetts is held copyhold and the second entry is part of the actual transfer to George as heir.5,6
On the 26th September 1592, George Barbar is recorded as being a juror in a coroners' inquest at Rotherfield. The case concerned a spinster, Agnes Hosmere, who had hanged herself.7
"Georg Barbar" is recorded as the owner of a freehold property known as Drapers on a 1597 survey map of the manor of Rotherfield. We know this was known as Drapers as it is mentioned in the Thomas Barber of Tonbridge will of 1683 and the location on the map matches the description of “Draper’s land” in Catherine Pullein’s book. According to the map, the property is 27 acres 0 roods and 10 perches. On the lease of 1662, the property is stated as being 22 acres. It is not known when the Drapers property came into the Nynne alias Barber family. However, the yearly rents of Rotherfield Church for 1509 record "Thomas Morley for Drapers on Mich. ijd" (Mich. meaning Michaelmas, 29 September, when the payment was due) indicating it was not held at that time.8,9
On 22 May 1603, George Barber or Nynne was appointed a churchwarden at Rotherfield St Denys. This was the same year that a new bell was purchased for the church, and cast on the bell is the inscription "Georg Barber, Edmund Knell, Wardens 1603". The bell survives today and is the fifth bell in a peal of eight.10
An entry in the churchwardens' accounts dated 22 Dec 1603 records the sale of an old bell, probably the one that was replaced by the new bell of 1603: "Md the day and yere above, written George Nynne and Edmund Knell, churchwardens, have sould unto Anthony ffowle of Retherfeild, gentleman, a littell Bell weying six and ffifty pound and heved receaved of the sayd Anthony for the same bell 28s. And this was recorded by the said Churchwardens in the presence of us: George Nynne his mark, Edmund Knell his mark, John Hosmer, clark there" . This document has George’s mark, written by his own hand, and although it probably indicates that he could not write it has clearly been written with a confident hand.11,12
At the manorial court of 4th April 1605, the list of people comprising the homage (the tenants of the manor assembled in the court) ends with "George Nynne alias Barber, searcher of raw tanned leather is sworn", giving some insight into his occupation. In this context, a searcher was a representative of a certain craft or guild whose role was to police the craft on behalf of the civic authorities and in the interests of the guild. For the leather industry there was a statute concerning the “true and just tanning, currying and working of leather” requiring mayors, bailiffs or other head officers in market towns to appoint and swear yearly two or more persons “of the most honest and skilful men” to search and apply a seal to leather that was of acceptable quality and to seize any leather or leather goods that had not been sufficiently tanned or curried. The appointment as a searcher was, in London at least, for a maximum of two years. (Danby Pickering, "The Statutes at Large, Vol VII", (1763), Cambridge. p. 106 (1 Jacobi [1604], CAP. XXII)).
George may therefore have had a background in the leather industry, possibly as a tanner or currier, both specialist crafts. A tanner treats skins of animals to produce leather, and a currier applies techniques of dressing, finishing and colouring to the tanned hide to make it strong, flexible and waterproof. He may also have been a fellmonger - a dealer in skins and hides. In Roland Harris’s "Rotherfield Historic Character Assessment Report, June 2008" he includes a section on economic history and states: "There are references to tanning, a currier, a saddler and glove makers in the period c1600-50. In 1652 tanners from Rotherfield sold their goods at the Lewes leather". Interestingly, George's grandson, William Bowden (1629- ) of Ticehurst, was a tanner.13,14
George Barber alias Nynne is mentioned in the will of Alexander Farmer dated 4 January 1605/6 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.15
George Barber alias Nynne is mentioned in the will of Henry Aderoll alias Skinner dated 6 July 1612 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.16
On 6 July 1612, Henry Aderoll alias Skynner made a will in which George Nynne alias Barber was the executor and all the Nynne alias Barber children named as beneficiaries along with the children of William Savage. There is no indication of the relationship between Henry Aderoll and the Barber or Savage family. However, manorial records show that William Savage’s wife is Gertrude (nee Farmer, bap. 20 March 1551/52 at Rotherfield, daughter of Thomas and Margaret Farmer) so there may have been a common family connection through the Farmers, as George’s mother Alice’s maiden name was Farmer also. There are no records in Rotherfield for the Savage family although the surname does appear in nearby Wadhurst and Ticehurst (e.g. Dorothy dau. William Savage buried at Wadhurst in 1619). The 1597 map of the survey of the manor of Rotherfield shows properties close to George Barber held by a Nicholas Adroll, Thomas Adroll and also a Robert Skinner but they are not mentioned in Henry’s will.
The will reads: In the name of God Amen the vith day of July in the year of our lord god one thousand six hundred and twelve I Henry Aderoll als Skynner of Retherfeild in the county of Sussex being sicke in body but of good and perfect remembrance thanks be given to Allmightie God therefore doe make and declare this my last will and testament in manner and forme following that is to say ffirst and principally I will and bequeath my soule unto Allmightie God my nercifull maker, Saviour and Redeemer by whome and through whome I hope to have foregiveness of all my synnes and my body to the earth from whence it came and Decently to be buried where it shall please God. Item I will and bequeath unto Nathaniel Savage (the sonne of William Savage, gent) the some of ffyve pounds of lawfull money of England to be paid to him by my executor within one year next after my decease. Item I will and bequeath unto Elizabeth Savage, Hester Savage and Thomas savage the children of the said William Savage and to each and every of them three, Three pounds of like money a peece to be paid to them and every of them by my Executor withion one yeare next after my decease. Item I will and bequeath unto Thomas Nynne als barber, Ffrances Nynne als barber, Elizabeth Nynne als Barber, Mary Nynne als Barber and to John Nynne als barber the children of George Nynne als Barber and to each and every of them tenne shillings of like lawfull money a peece to be paid to them and every of them by my Executor within one yeare next after my decease. Item I give and bequeath unto Elizabeth the wife of the said George Nynne one joyned chest. Item I will and bequeath unto Mary the daughter of the said George Nynne one other chest. All the rest of my goods and household stuff not before given and bequeathed, my debts first paid, my legacies discharged and funeral expenses p’formed I will and bequeath unto George Nynne als Barber whome I make my sole Executor of this my will. And I doe ordayne and make William Nynne als Barber to be my faithfull and trustie overseer. And I give to him iijs iiijd and his charges borne. There being witnesses ./ John Hosmer and William Chowne. The marke of Henry Aderoll als Skynner.
Transcribed by John Howes, December 2012. (Probate was granted 2 Nov 1613)
Court Rolls of the manor of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, 1587-1593, Vol. 3 of handwritten translation by Catherine Pullein c1928 (ESRO: PAR 465/26/1/3), p. 35 (PDF document p. 22/106).16,17
George Barber alias Nynne died in 1627 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
George Barber alias Nynne was buried on 11 April 1627 at St Denys, Rotherfield, Sussex, England, aged about 68 years and recorded as "George Barber als Nyne.18"
George Barber alias Nynne left a will made on 18 January 1617 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.19
"George Nynne als Barber of Retherfeld, Sussex, sick in body, my body to be decently buried when it shall please God. I will to Thomas my son my best 'cobberd' [cupboard], my long table frame and two forms belonging to it standing in my hall, my great joined chest, and my great watering vat and all my weans [pigs 12 or so weeks old], coortes [carts] and ploughs, yokes, 'tyghtes' and all my other husbandry tackle and tools. I will to Elizabeth, my wife, all the residue of my household stuff not before by me willed. My will is that my wife Elizabeth and her assigns shall have the chamber over the hall with a chimney in it and a little buttery chamber at the end of my said hall in my now dwelling house with free liberty to go and come to and from the said rooms in my said house during her life and also she, at the costs and charges of Thomas my said son, and his heirs, shall have sufficient fire and 'flett' [Old English - dwelling, floor, ground] in my said dwelling house for life, with frank and free liberty to bake and brew and to dress meat and drink and to do any other necessary business fit for housekeeping in my said messuage or dwelling house, with free liberty to have and take meet [suitable] and necessary water to do her or their businesses in or about the said messuage for life, with liberty to go and come to and from the same premises to do the same at her will and pleasure. I give to Frances, my daughter, £10 to be paid to her or her heirs or assigns within one year after my decease. I will to Elizabeth, my daughter, £10 to be paid to her, her heirs or assigns within two years after my decease. I will to Mary, my daughter, £10 to be paid to her, her heirs or assigns within three years after my decease. I will that my son Thomas, his heirs or assigns, shall pay to John my son out of my freehold land lying in Retherfeld £10 within five years after my decease and if my son Thomas does not pay the same to John then it will be lawful for John to enter upon all my freehold land lands and into any part and parcel thereof and to distrain and to impound and keep in his custody until the said sum of £10 be fully paid and satisfied. The rest of my goods and chattels not before willed and bequeathed, my debts first paid, my legacies discharged and my funeral expenses performed, I will to Elizabeth my wife and to Thomas my son who I make my executors. I make John Nynne als Barber, and William Nynne als Barber, my loving brothers, my overseers in trust of this will. And to each of them 3s 4d apiece and their charges borne in and about my business.
Mark of George Nynne als Barber.
Witnesses: John Hosmer seni., Willm Barber alius Nynne, John Hosmer Jun.
Probate 26 May 1627 on the oath of Thomas Nynne als Barber, the son ,and one of the executors named, power reserved to Elizabeth Nynne als Barber, the relict of the deceased, the other executor named in the will."
(Transcribed by Gillian Rickard for Geoffrey Barber, 2010.)
His estate was probated on 26 May 1627 at Lewes, Sussex, England.
The items listed in both George and Elizabeth's wills give us a wonderful insight into the domestic life of this family. The Elizabethan age was a time of rising standards of living, with significant progress in the structure and layout of ordinary houses and also improvements in household furniture from rudimentary, functional pieces to items that were better quality, more comfortable and decorative. An understanding of the development of houses and household items at this time is required to put the information in these wills in context.
At the start of Elizabethan period (1558-1603) the majority of people lived in a single storey house which comprised two rooms:
The parlour or chamber which was where the husband and wife slept. The parlour however had multiple uses being the best room in the house and was also used to entertain visitors.
The hall used for cooking and eating as well as being the room where other family members slept. It would have had an open ceiling with smoke from the fire drifting up to the rafters, usually escaping from a small hole in the gable end, and so is often referred to as an “open hall”. ( F.G. Emmison, “Elizabethan Life – Home, Work and Land”, Essex Record Office Publication No. 69 (1976)).
Against the side of the house there may have been a lean-to used as a buttery (for brewing), pantry or larder. This could also have been a small room constructed inside the house by taking up some of the space in the hall for example.
Larger cottages may have had a third room, called a service room, where food was prepared. This is not necessarily the same as a kitchen which was often a separate building detached from the main house to reduce the fire risk. Some cottages also had separate barns.
Smoke was a problem in early houses, and smoke bays were introduced to isolate the smoke but still allow it to escape through the roof or gable end. This enabled the rest of the roof space area to be used for an upstairs room. Peter Harness, conservation officer in the London Borough of Bexley, wrote the following about smoke bay houses:
"Smoke bay houses first made their appearance at a time traditionally associated with the ‘Great Rebuilding’ around 1550. On the evolutionary scale, this type comes between the open hall of the Middle Ages and the brick chimney houses of the 17th century. The smoke bay was an attempt to confine the smoke from the fire within a narrow timber-framed bay screened with lath and plaster. The bay would have continued to the apex of the roof, and is today evidenced by heavy sooting on some remaining timbers, and on plastered panelling within. The use of the bay to heat the hall-kitchen would have presented a considerable fire risk, even though the inside was plastered to protect the timber framing.” (Webpage Institute of Historic Building Conservation (http://www.ihbc.org.uk/context_archive/16/smoke.htm) “A Smoke-Bay House” by Peter Harness”. Accessed: 19 Apr 2014).
Upstairs rooms were called sollars (or solar or soller) meaning loft (as opposed to a seller or cellar which is a storeroom most often on the ground floor and not underground as we would think today). The sollar was sometimes used for storage, but also as private living and sleeping quarters as they were separate from the noise and smells of the hall which everyone used.
The “Great Rebuilding” mentioned by Peter Harness refers to the period 1570-1640 where there was a revolution in housing design, although the term is somewhat discredited now. Bricks started to be used in ordinary housing for the construction of fireplaces and the central hearth in the open hall was replaced by a single or double (back to back) fireplace which allowed the heating of both rooms. More importantly, the installation of chimneys facilitated greater development of upper chambers under the roof rafters and new houses began to be constructed as fully two storey houses. This new style of “closed” housing is essentially what we are familiar with today. (Danae Tankard, "Houses of the Weald and Downland", Carnegie Publishing, (2012) pp. 79,80.)
George Barber’s will (1617) specifically gives his wife the use of “the chamber over the hall with a chimney in it and a little buttery chamber at the end of my said hall” indicating that they had a two story house with chimneys and an internal buttery chamber. This buttery would have been a room in which butts, barrels or bottles of alcoholic drink were stored and from which they were served into the hall.
More information about the house can be gleaned from the description of their property (called Bonnetts) in the manorial court rolls, as after George died in 1627 there is a record of his son Thomas being admitted to the property:
11 Oct 1627: Steward: Tho Houghton, gent. Admission of Tho Nynne als Barber, eldest son of Geo N.als B., on his father's death. Messuage & garden at Retherfield Hill, of 1 rod, & a barn called Bonnetts, with a Way from said messuage to the barn; Also a garden of 1 rod called Bacheland next to said barn; Also a parcel [of] meadow of 1/2 ac, a Kitchen (coquinam) once of Alice Adowne, & a garden once of Adam Farmer. (ESRO SAS AB 398)
This indicates that they likely had a separate building which functioned as a kitchen. A separate barn is also mentioned. One is left with the impression that they had certainly kept up with the changing times and probably were considered to have had quite a comfortable house.
As an aside, the description of the Bonnetts/Bennetts property (with the “Way”, ½ acre meadow, garden of 1 rod, etc.) and its location on Rotherfield Hill (now Church Road), allows the location of the property to be identified. Using the 1842 tithe map we see that the property would have been at the location of the current Town Hill House, a Grade II listed property dating from the 18th century which is just across the road from the church (see Appendix II). It appears that George and Elizabeth’s cottage has not survived, unless it has been incorporated in the newer house. In April 2014 the owner, Mrs P. Rice, was kind enough to show me the inside of the house. First impressions are that the back of the house looks older than the front which has had some modification in recent times including the removal of two chimneys which are clearly visible on c1910 postcards. An archaeological inspection, particularly in the roof space, is required to properly determine its age.
George’s will also mentions specific items of furniture, in particular “my best 'cobberd' [cupboard], my long table frame and two forms belonging to it standing in my hall”. We know from this that the hall was furnished with one or more cupboards and a refectory style table with two long benches (forms) confirming that the hall was used for meals. In the early 1500s a table would have been a board or plank of wood sitting on two trestles. George’s will refers to the “long table frame”, indicating that he had a rigid table with fixed ends joined by stretchers or rails. In Elizabethan times, tables with four or more legs joined by stretchers near the floor level became common. George’s table would have been a valuable item, the centre piece for the house, particularly if it was the work of a joiner and decorated with some wood turning or carving.
George also mentions “my great joined chest” which emphasises the difference between joiner and carpenter made furniture which became significant at this time. Most Elizabethan homes were sparsely furnished with crude and utilitarian items produced by a carpenter (or, in the case of chests, produced by a carpenter and a blacksmith). However, during this period the craft of the joiner started to come to the fore, making furniture using joints and producing superior and more ornamental pieces. We therefore find many wills where some furniture items are specifically identified as “joined” because of their value and status. Elizabeth Barber’s will (1637) is typical and mentions a number of chests one of which is “joined” (the work of a joiner) and the others which are “boarded” (the work of a carpenter). It is important to note that chests were often just as important for their use as seating as well as storage, as a chair was a rare item in most households at the start of the 17th century and if there was one it was reserved for the head of the family (hence the origin of the word “chairman”).

Family

Elizabeth Godsell b. 21 Dec 1561, d. 1638
Marriage*
George Barber alias Nynne married Elizabeth Godsell, daughter of Richard Godsell, on 2 December 1582 at Hadlow, Kent, England.1 
Children

Citations

  1. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/).
  2. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) "GS Film number: 992517."
  3. [S441] Indexed translation of a court book of the manor of Rotherfield, 1587-1593 (ESRO: PAR 465/26/1/3) "p. 1."
  4. [S112] Will of John Barber als Nynne of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 10 Apr 1589, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 25 May 1591. (ESRO: PBT 1/1/8/423D).
  5. [S441] Indexed translation of a court book of the manor of Rotherfield, 1587-1593 (ESRO: PAR 465/26/1/3) "Pullein unnumbered page but between 57 and 59 (PDF document pg 58/106)."
  6. [S335] Catharine Pullein's notebook from the box file marked "Pullein" in the Working Papers Room at the Sussex Archaeological Society's Barbican Library in Lewes, East Sussex., c1925. (unknown document ref) p. 108.
  7. [S280] R F Hunnisett, "Sussex Coroners' Inquests 1558-1603", PRO Publications, First Edition (1996) "Inquest No 443, p. 109."
  8. [S105] Survey (map) of land held of the Manor of Rotherfield, "described in the Year 1597 by Richard Allin of Roberstsbridge in Sussex, and new drawn on vellum and collored in the yeare 1664 by John Pattenden of Brenchley in Kent", of the manor of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, 1597 (ESRO: ACC 363/111r).
  9. [S104] Catharine Pullein, "Rotherfield: The Story of Some Wealden Manors", Courier, First Edition (1928) "pp. 235, 321."
  10. [S104] Catharine Pullein, "Rotherfield: The Story of Some Wealden Manors", Courier, First Edition (1928) "pp. 107,224."
  11. [S104] Catharine Pullein, "Rotherfield: The Story of Some Wealden Manors", Courier, First Edition (1928) "pp. 241,242."
  12. [S108] Churchwardens' account book for Rotherfield, 1510-1675. (ESRO: PAR 465/10/3/1) p. 56.
  13. [S104] Catharine Pullein, "Rotherfield: The Story of Some Wealden Manors", Courier, First Edition (1928) "p. 281."
  14. [S438] Roland B Harris, "Rotherfield Historical Character Assessment Report 2008 (Sussex Extensive Urban Survey Project)", Wealden District Council, First Edition (June 2008) "p. 13."
  15. [S451] Indexed translation of a court book of the manor of Rotherfield, 1593-1606 (ESRO: PAR 465/26/1/4) "Court of the manor of Rotherfield held Thursday 15 January 3 James I [1605/06].
    "
  16. [S361] Will of Henry Aderoll alias Skynner of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 6 Jul 1612, proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 2 Nov 1613. (TNA: PROB 11/122/389).
  17. [S441] Indexed translation of a court book of the manor of Rotherfield, 1587-1593 (ESRO: PAR 465/26/1/3) "p. 35 (PDF document p. 22/106)."
  18. [S103] Transcript of the Parish Register of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, (ESRO: PAR 465/1/1/1).
  19. [S113] Will of George Nynne als Barber of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 18 Jan 1617, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 26 May 1627. (ESRO: PBT/1/1/20/40A).

Elizabeth Godsell

b. 21 December 1561, d. 1638
FatherRichard Godsell b. c 1530
     Elizabeth Godsell was born in 1561 at Brenchley, Kent, England.
Elizabeth Godsell was baptized on 21 December 1561 at Brenchley, Kent, England. She was the daughter of Richard Godsell.
Elizabeth Godsell married George Barber alias Nynne, son of John Barber alias Nynne and Alice Farmer, on 2 December 1582 at Hadlow, Kent, England.1
As of 2 December 1582, her married name was Barber alias Nynne.
The only possibility for their marriage was found at Hadlow in Kent and although this has been shown above it should not be treated as certain. Subsequent research found Elizabeth Godsell (or Gutsold/Gutsall) baptised 21 Dec 1561 at Brenchley in Kent, daughter of Richard Gutsold/Gutsall.
There is circumstantial evidence for supporting this marriage being the correct one. Their daughter, Elizabeth married William Bowden in 1622 in Horsmonden, Kent which is a village next to Brenchley i.e. in the area where her mother may have been born. In addition there are many Godsell/Gudsell/Gotsole/Gutsall baptisms in Frant and Ticehurst from 1605 onwards. If this is correct, it highlights that they used the surname Barber outside of Rotherfield, and not Nynne, which could indicate that Barber was their real surname, and Nynne just an alias.
Also, there is a gap between their marriage in 1582 and their first known child, Thomas, in 1585. Could there have been an earlier child (named George?) baptised elsewhere and who later died?2
Elizabeth Godsell is mentioned in the will of Henry Aderoll alias Skinner dated 6 July 1612 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.3
Elizabeth Godsell is mentioned in the will of George Barber alias Nynne dated 18 January 1617 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.4
Elizabeth Godsell left a will made on 12 September 1637 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.5
"Elizabeth Nyne als Barber of Retherfeild, Sussex, widow, sick in body, my body to be decently buried in the churchyard of the parish of Retherfeild when it shall please God. I give to John Nyne als Barber, my son, £10 to be paid to him within two years after my decease. I give to the said John my son half a dozen of pewter [sic], one pewter pott, two pairs of good hempen sheets, one feather bed that I lie upon, one bolster, one feather pillow, also one joined chest. I give to Frances Nyne als Barber, my daughter, one feather bed, one pair of fine sheets and one pair of coarse sheets, one boarded chest, half a dozen of pewter, great and small, one brass kettle, one brass 'possnett' [stew pan or skillet]. I give to Elizabeth Bowden, my daughter my best gown, my flannel petticoat, my waistcoat that is at the tailor's a-making, two pewter platters. I give to William Bowden, my nephew, one pewter platter, one boarded chest standing at the feet of my bed. I give to John Bowden, my nephew, 10s of money. I give to Jane Bowden, my niece, one tablecloth, two napkins, one little box. I give to the said John my son one barrel, one keeler [a wooden tub]. I give to the said Elizabeth Bowden my daughter one barrel and two napkins. I give to John my son two napkins. I give to Frances, my daughter, two napkins. All the rest of my goods not before by me willed and bequeathed, my debts first paid, my legacies discharged and my funeral expences performed, I give wholly to Thomas Nynne als Barber, my son, who I make my sole executor.
Mark of
Elizabeth Nynne als Barber.
Witnesses:
Adam Farmar, John Hosmer.
Probate 3 December 1638 on the oath of
Thomas Nynn als Barber, the natural and legitimate son of the deceased and executor named."
(Transcribed by Gillian Rickard for Geoffrey Barber, 2010.)
Elizabeth Godsell died in 1638 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
Elizabeth Godsell was buried on 31 October 1638 at St Denys, Rotherfield, Sussex, England. The entry in the parish register transcripts is simply: "Buried -------- Barber (widow als Nyne)".6
Her estate was probated on 3 December 1638 at Lewes, Sussex, England.
Elizabeth’s will contains wonderful details about the household goods that were important to her, even to the extent of mentioning “my waistcoat that is at the tailor's a-making”. Here is an inventory of those items:
Cooking and Eating
A dozen pewter
Three pewter platters
One pewter pot
One brass kettle [note that brass meant bronze at this time]
One brass possnett [a stew pan or skillet]
One tablecloth
Eight napkins
Bedding
Two feather beds
One bolster
One feather pillow
Two pairs of good hempen sheets
One pair of fine sheets
One pair of coarse sheets
Clothing
Best gown
Flannel petticoat
Waistcoat at the tailor’s a-making
Chests
One joined chest
Two boarded chests [one is at the foot of her bed]
Other
One little box [possibly for jewellery and personal items]
Two barrels
One keeler [a broad, shallow wooden tub, possibly used for washing dishes]
The will states that the remainder of her goods are to be given to her son Thomas, so there may have been other items in addition to the above.
Pewter was used extensively for tableware in Europe from the Middle Ages until the 18th and 19th Centuries when it was replaced by mass production of pottery and porcelain items. Pewter used for tableware generally consisted of 85-99% tin, and the rest copper, producing a harder, shinier and more durable alloy than lower grade pewter which would also contain some lead. Pewter items were valuable and therefore mentioned in the will.
Many items of tableware were also made of wood but would not be included in a will because of their low value. Such wood items were also called “treenware” (treen platters, treen bowls, etc.) and would have been used on the table with the pewter items. Pottery was another common and low value item. Note that there is also no mention of knives as each person brought their own to the table and forks did not become common in England until the 18th century. Household linen was valuable though and tablecloths, napkins and bed sheets are mentioned.
The feather bed were items of luxury as many people slept on straw pallets or rough mats. Elizabeth’s unmarried daughter Frances may have been sleeping in the same room given that there were two beds and one was left to her in the will. The mention of hempen sheets is interesting. The early hemp industry produced ropes, canvas and hempen cloth, some of which could rival flaxen cloth (linen) in quality. The coarse sheets mentioned were probably more like a canvas and the fine sheets were possibly made of linen. There is no mention of blankets which she may have considered belonging more to the household rather than being one of her personal items and hence belonging to her son Thomas who had inherited the house some years ago via George’s will.
Her items of clothing (best gown, waistcoat at the tailor’s a-making) suggest that she looked after her appearance and she probably wore these to church. The family had a strong connection to Rotherfield St Denys and even had a chair of their own inside the church built by George’s father in 1572 (and later sold in 1679). In addition, George had been a churchwarden as had his father and grandfather (who was also the church sexton in 1548) and was a regular attendee of the presentation of the churchwardens accounts meetings up until 1622.

Family

George Barber alias Nynne b. c 1558, d. 1627
Marriage*
Elizabeth Godsell married George Barber alias Nynne, son of John Barber alias Nynne and Alice Farmer, on 2 December 1582 at Hadlow, Kent, England.1 
Children

Citations

  1. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/).
  2. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) "GS Film number: 992517."
  3. [S361] Will of Henry Aderoll alias Skynner of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 6 Jul 1612, proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 2 Nov 1613. (TNA: PROB 11/122/389).
  4. [S113] Will of George Nynne als Barber of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 18 Jan 1617, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 26 May 1627. (ESRO: PBT/1/1/20/40A).
  5. [S114] Will of Elizabeth Nyne als Barber of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 12 Sep 1637, proved in the Archdeaconry Court at Lewes, 3 Dec 1638. (ESRO: PBT/1/1/25/189).
  6. [S103] Transcript of the Parish Register of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, (ESRO: PAR 465/1/1/1).

John Barber alias Nynne

b. circa 1530, d. 1591
FatherJohn Barber alias Nynne b. c 1500, d. 1548
MotherJoan (?) b. c 1500, d. 1577
     John Barber alias Nynne was born circa 1530 at England. He was the son of John Barber alias Nynne and Joan (?)
John Barber alias Nynne married Alice Farmer, daughter of John Farmer, on 8 April 1554 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1
The marriage is recorded as "John Nen married Alis Farmer".1
Farmer/Fermor is an old Rotherfield name with a long history in the parish.2
There is an interesting entry on the inside back cover of the Rotherfield churchwarden accounts book (undated but a comparison of the handwriting with other entries in the book by ESRO archivist Christopher Whittick dates it at 1550 to 1560):
Be it known by thys present that I John nynde otherwise called barber of the parishe of Retherfyld have reseived [received]of the parish aforesaid 3 pounds of good & lawfull English money for the keeping of a child & have made promis to the parish to keep her honestly & to discharge the parish of the said child for ever.
John Nynne has been paid £3 to take responsibility for the girl, most likely an orphan, and thus discharge the parish of any obligation for her. She may have simply been adopted or alternatively, taken in to be trained in homemaking and essently become a servant. Regardless of which, she would have become a part of their family just as young apprentices were at that time. There may be a connection to the fact that John and Alice’s first child George was buried in 1555, and so she may have been taken in to assist or comfort Alice.3
John lived during the reign of “Bloody Queen Mary” (1553-1558) who tried to turn England back to Catholicism and took religious persecution to extremes. Three Rotherfield citizens were burnt at the stake in Lewes for their Protestant beliefs (Alexander Hosmer and Ann Ashdowne, burnt about 22 June 1557, and later John Ashdowne). In 1556 the rector of Rotherfield, William Collyer was deprived of his living and although a new rector, John Baxter, was appointed, there are no entries in the church registers from 1555 until 1558 when Queen Mary died. Norman Peachell, an 11xgreat grandson of John Filknisch (Fyltnesse/Filtness), churchwarden with John Barber in 1532, writes that John Filknisch's son Edward was "taken for heresy in the days of Bloody Mary but somehow got away with it". Pullein states that Edward and two others were taken in 1556 but managed to flee and escape before reaching Lewes, eventually returning to Rotherfield where Edward is mentioned in manorial court records of 10 March 1557/58. It was a dangerous time in Rotherfield and would have affected everyone in the village.4
John Farmer's will made 13 Oct 1558 mentions "John Nynde's two children". One of these is obviously George Nynne but who is the other, as all are accounted for in John Nynne's will made in 1589? Could it be the adopted child?5,6
John Barber alias Nynne is mentioned in the will of John Farmer dated 13 October 1558 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.6,5
In the manorial court held on 11 May 1 Eliz. (1559), John Nynde is elected a headman. On 17 October 1 Eliz. (1559) he is listed as one of three "constables of this hundred" and also headman of Southborough and his presentations to the court refer to him as the "headman there with his ten" (his jury of ten men). In the manorial court held 29 April 2 Eliz. [1560] John Nynne is listed again as headborough (or headborgh) for Southborough, and at the end of his presentation to the court two from within the ten men are nominated for headborough, and one is appointed to the position, indicating that John had completed his period of service. Transcriptions of manorial court records for 1557 and 1558 (i.e. Queen Mary's reign) do exist and have been searched but there was no mention of John Nynne as having any official positions or involvement, which was probably wise given there was so much upheaval in the parish with regard to convictions for heresy.7
Pullein mentions that the Manor was divided into three tithings: Northborough, Southborough and Frant, with a headman over each. According to the Middle English Dictionary, the tithing was “an English system of collective surety within a territorial unit by which a group of ten freemen or villagers combined to give security for each other to keep the peace and to guarantee payment of fines or fees”. In practice, the number of villagers in a tithing would vary according to the situation and could be more or less than ten. The word “borgh” is another word meaning a tithing, hence the name Northborgh, Southborgh, etc., or Northborough and Southborough.
A headman would attend the Rotherfield court with his tithing (nominally ten men hence “with his ten”) and they were responsible for keeping the peace in their area. Southborough was evidently the most important for in it lay the village and the church where so much business was transacted.
Although having various meanings, by the early 16th century the term headman (also called headborgh or headborough) described a parish law-enforcement officer subordinate to constable. In the court rolls they are listed immediately under the constables for the hundred (a hundred being an administrative area comprising a number of parishes – originally an area supporting a hundred families, or ten tithings). Their responsibilities can be seen by the various items that John Nynne "with his ten" presented to the court, all requiring judgements and fines to be dispensed to those responsible. Upkeep of roads, hedges, ditches and property are frequent topics, although occasional disputes leading to damage or violence are also presented. The phrase "John Nynne and his ten" also highlights an interesting aspect concerning the evolution of the jury system. In earlier times, a defendant could establish his innocence by taking an oath and getting a required number of persons, typically twelve, to swear they believed the defendant's oath (called compurgation). This later became a group of people from the community (e.g. John Nynne and his ten) who knew the parties and the facts at issue and who could swear as to the guilt or innocence of the accused. This appears to be how the court operated in Rotherfield at this time.8
On the 22 March 1572, Robert Rivers and John Ninne alias Barber were made churchwardens of Rotherfield St Denys for that year.9
In 1572, the churchwardens' accounts record the building of a new seat in the church: "Mem. that Nicholas Manard, Richard Coe, John Stapely, William Dongate, Leonard Callis, thomas Lockier, John howman and John Ninne did build and sett upp the newe seatt next belowe and adjoyninge to the chauncell viz: on the north side off the chauncell Door at their own costs and charges for them and their heires to sett in, and that any other usinge or setting in the same is by them to be forbidden" . The paying for seats to be built and re-built in the church for the exclusive use by the owners and their heirs, and the subsequent buying and selling of these seats, was a characteristic of the church for about one hundred and sixty years after seats were first introduced in 1532. This may be the seat that was sold on 19 July 1679 "that formerly did belong to Thomas Barbour".10
On the 9th June 1574, John Nynne was a juror in a coroners' inquest held at Rotherfield. The inquest concerned a person, John Buckeleyne, who had drowned himself. On the 8th August 1582, John Nynne was again a juror at a coroners' inquest concerning the killing of John Westnet by poachers.11,12
John's service to the parish as a headborough, a churchwarden and as a juror at coronial inquests indicates that he was a respected member of the community.
The earliest evidence of the Barber alias Nynnes possessing the property called Drapers occurs in John’s lifetime. Drapers was 22½ acres of land in the High Cross area just outside Rotherfield village. Catherine Pullein's notebooks record extracts from an undated Quit Rental for Rotherfield which she states is "proved by me to be before Feb. 1580" which records "John Nynn. For 12 acres of freland called Drapers lying between scottyll croch and fathermans. For 101/2 acres (ditto)". This is evidence of John Nynn owning the property Drapers at that time.13
There are also a number of property transactions in the manorial court rolls that involve John Nynne and the Farmer family:
At the manorial court of 2 May 1587, John Nynne is mentioned: Adam Farmer out of Court, viz. Sep 11(?) by John Nynne alias Barber deputy of Isaac Alchorne, bedell, in presence of John Staple, Nic. Coe & George Farmer, surrenders 1 mess. 1 barn & 1 garden cont. 1/2 ac. at Town hyll in R. to use of Margt Farmer his wife.
Pullein adds a note that Adam Farmer, a weaver, was buried 18 Apr 1587. If this is the same Adam Farmer as mentioned above then he therefore can't be the Adam Farmer (son of John Farmer) who was appointed overseer in John Nynne's will in 1589. The above entry is an example of a deathbed transfer where a person near death could instruct a manorial officer in the presence of witnesses regarding the disposal of his property on his death. Those present then attended the next manorial court meet to carry out the dying (or dead) tenants wishes.14,15
At the manorial court held on 2 Aug 1587: "Thomas Farmer at Marke (Cross) surr. 1 messuage, 1 garden, 1 piece of land cont. 3 acres on furling of Frith in R. To use of John Nynne alias Barber"
At the manorial court held on 1 Apr 1588: "John Nynne alias Barber prays to be admitted to 1 mess. 1 barn 1 garden & 1 parcel adjt to sd mes. at Mark crosse cont. 3 ac on f. of Fryth in R. which Thos Farmer at the court held on 2 Augt last surrendered to use of sd John. Comes John N. alias B & surr. above to use of Thos Farmer & his heirs."
This may be an example where a copyhold property was surrendered to the use of a will, with John Nynne alias Barber the executor of the will (needs further work to check this as it would appear that Thomas Farmer was buried 15 Apr 1591). If anything, it does indicate a close relationship between the Farmers and the Barber alias Nynne.
Immediately following these transactions Thomas and Margaret Farmer nominate their daughter Gertrude Savage, wife of William Savage, as their heir so the transactions do appear to be part of an inheritance strategy. The families of John Barber and William Savage are linked again in the will of Henry Aderoll alias Skynner in 1612 (documented in under George Nynne alias Barber) which names both families’ children as beneficiaries.16
John Barber alias Nynne died in 1591 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
John Barber alias Nynne was buried on 15 May 1591 at St Denys, Rotherfield, Sussex, England; recorded as John Barber als Nynne.1
John Barber alias Nynne left a will made on 10 April 1589 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.17
His estate was probated on 25 May 1591 at Lewes, Sussex, England.
John Barber als Nynne of Retherfield, Sussex, my body to be buried in the churchyard of Retherfield. I will to Alice Barber my wife the house wherein I now dwell together with the barn, outhouses, orchard, garden and the little croft thereunto adjoining for life and also to her all the household stuff within the said house together with half the corn in the barn and half the corn on the ground which I the said John or George my son have or hath in occupying for me. I will to William my son £10 to be paid to him within two years next after my decease. (crossed out: Item: I give unto Mary my daughter £20, £10 whereof to be paid unto the said Mary within four years next after my decease & the other £10 to be paid to the said Mary within four years next after the time of payment of her said first £10.) I will to my son John £10 to be paid to him 6 years after my decease. My will and meaning is that if any of my aforesaid sons or Mary my daughter die before the time of payment, not being married, then his, her or their part shall remain to them, him or her who survives. My will is that my sister Margaret shall have a sufficient dwelling in my house with my wife for life. I will to George my eldest son, who I make the sole executor of this my last will and testament, the residue of all my goods and chattels and of the execution hereof I make Adam Farmer, son to John Farmer, deceased, and Thomas Barber, my brother, overseers.
John Barber's sign.
Witnesses: John Wickham, John Middleton.
Probate 25 May 1591 to George, the son and executor named. William Barber als Nynne minor.
(Transcribed by Gillian Rickard for Geoffrey Barber, 2010.)
During John’s lifetime, there were other Nynne alias Barbers in the nearby parish of Ticehurst. The earliest reference is a baptism on 25 Aug 1577 of Thomas son of Richard Nynne als Barbor. Given the rarity of the name it is almost certain that Richard is related to John, possibly a brother or son. If Richard was born c1555 then his baptism may never have been recorded as there are gaps in the church records at Rotherfield during the reign of Queen Mary. However, there is no mention of Richard in John Nynne alias Barber's will made in 1589, so he is more likely to be John's brother rather than his son in which case he may have been born before 1538 when the recording of baptisms first began.18
Richard was obviously a respected member of the community in Ticehurst as he appears as a juror in a coroners' inquest on 3 Oct 1584 at Etchingham where the case concerned John Sovage of Ticehurst, who had hanged himself.19
Richard was buried in Ticehurst on 20 Apr 1603 as Richard Nynn als Barber.18
The administration of Richard's estate was granted to his wife: 5 May 1603 – admon of the goods of Richard Nyn late of Tiseherst, deceased, granted to Johanne, his relict, in the person of Robert Oteingham, notary public and procurator. Bonds William Nyn of Tiseherst, ‘paylemaker’, and Christopher Fowle of the same parish, husbandman, in £30. Inventory examined, value £15 15s 2d.20
There are baptisms for two of Richard’s sons in the Ticehurst registers: Thomas (25 August 1577) and John (11 Oct 1584). Both were buried in 1584. The above grant of administration suggests that there is at least one surviving son, William, whose baptism has not been found. The burial entry for Richard's wife Joan on 24 May 1620 supports this by stating that she is "mother of William". There are also burials in Ticehurst of Silvester Barber alias Nynn on 20 November 1608 and Richard Barber alias Nynn on 19 March 1610 who could also be children of Richard and Joan.
Their son William married Elizabeth Fuller at Ticehurst on 21 August 1609 and the Ticehurst parish registers record the following baptisms of William's children: Susan (bap. 1611, bur. 1611), Ann (bap. 1615), Richard (bap. 1622, bur. 1631). The entry in the burial register for Richard in 1631 states that he is the son of William Barber alias Nynn and this is the last reference to the Nynn surname in Ticehurst. There is also a marriage in Ticehurst on 4 February 1638/39 of a Thomas Barber and Joan Primer and this Thomas is another son of William and Elizabeth (baptised at Burwash on 15 April 1610, "son of William Barber of Tishurst"). William was buried in Ticehurst on 13 January 1625 and the Barber surname does carry through the Ticehurst parish registers into the 1700’s. Prior to the earliest Richard, the only Barber in Ticehurst is a Jhon (John) Barber, gent, and his wife Elizabeth who first get mentioned with the baptism of their son Wyllm (William) on 30 Aug 1562. Wyllm and Elizabeth are both buried in 1562. There are some Sussex Archaeological Society deeds relating to this family, and a brief inspection indicated that no males survived, that the name Nynne was never mentioned, that there were a number of daughters, and that a daughter Frances Barber was the main beneficiary.

Family

Alice Farmer b. c 1530, d. 1595
Marriage*
John Barber alias Nynne married Alice Farmer, daughter of John Farmer, on 8 April 1554 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1 
Children

Citations

  1. [S103] Transcript of the Parish Register of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, (ESRO: PAR 465/1/1/1).
  2. [S104] Catharine Pullein, "Rotherfield: The Story of Some Wealden Manors", Courier, First Edition (1928) "Chap XXX and XXXI "The Fermors of Walsh Manor.""
  3. [S108] Churchwardens' account book for Rotherfield, 1510-1675. (ESRO: PAR 465/10/3/1) page 144.
  4. [S104] Catharine Pullein, "Rotherfield: The Story of Some Wealden Manors", Courier, First Edition (1928) "Chap XXIII "The Marian Persecution in Rotherfield.""
  5. [S586] Will of John Fermar of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 13 Oct 1558, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 20 Mar 1558/59. (ESRO: PBT 1/1/4/305A).
  6. [S572] R. Garraway Rice & edited by Walter H. Godfrey, "Transcript of Sussex Wills, Vol IV: Racton to Yapton", Sussex Record Society, First Edition (1940) "p. 25."
  7. [S440] Indexed translation of a court book of the manor of Rotherfield, 1557-1560 (ESRO: PAR 465/26/1/2) "page 9 of 78 (1559), page 51 of 78 (1560)."
  8. [S104] Catharine Pullein, "Rotherfield: The Story of Some Wealden Manors", Courier, First Edition (1928) "pp48,49."
  9. [S104] Catharine Pullein, "Rotherfield: The Story of Some Wealden Manors", Courier, First Edition (1928) "page 223."
  10. [S104] Catharine Pullein, "Rotherfield: The Story of Some Wealden Manors", Courier, First Edition (1928) "page 247,252,253."
  11. [S280] R F Hunnisett, "Sussex Coroners' Inquests 1558-1603", PRO Publications, First Edition (1996) "Inquest No 127, p28."
  12. [S280] R F Hunnisett, "Sussex Coroners' Inquests 1558-1603", PRO Publications, First Edition (1996) "Inquest No 285, p64."
  13. [S335] Catharine Pullein's notebook from the box file marked "Pullein" in the Working Papers Room at the Sussex Archaeological Society's Barbican Library in Lewes, East Sussex., c1925. (unknown document ref) page 108.
  14. [S111] Court Rolls of the manor of Rotherfield, 1587-1631 (ESRO: ACC 2953/86).
  15. [S441] Indexed translation of a court book of the manor of Rotherfield, 1587-1593 (ESRO: PAR 465/26/1/3) "page 5/106 and 7/106 of the PDF (pages 6&7 are out of order)."
  16. [S441] Indexed translation of a court book of the manor of Rotherfield, 1587-1593 (ESRO: PAR 465/26/1/3) "page 11/106, and page 22/106 of the PDF."
  17. [S112] Will of John Barber als Nynne of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 10 Apr 1589, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 25 May 1591. (ESRO: PBT 1/1/8/423D).
  18. [S116] Transcript of the Parish Register of Ticehurst, Sussex, England, (ESRO: PAR 492/2/1).
  19. [S280] R F Hunnisett, "Sussex Coroners' Inquests 1558-1603", PRO Publications, First Edition (1996) "Inquest No 311, p70."
  20. [S130] Letters of administration of the estate of Richard Nyn of Ticehurst, Sussex, England, granted by the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 5 May 1603 (ESRO: PBT 1/3/3/17F).

Mary Barber alias Nynne

b. 5 June 1562
FatherJohn Barber alias Nynne b. c 1530, d. 1591
MotherAlice Farmer b. c 1530, d. 1595
     Mary Barber alias Nynne was baptized on 5 June 1562 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England. She was the daughter of John Barber alias Nynne and Alice Farmer.
Mary Barber alias Nynne is mentioned in the will of John Barber alias Nynne dated 10 April 1589 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1

Citations

  1. [S112] Will of John Barber als Nynne of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 10 Apr 1589, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 25 May 1591. (ESRO: PBT 1/1/8/423D).

John Barber alias Nynne

b. 13 February 1602, d. 1667
FatherGeorge Barber alias Nynne b. c 1558, d. 1627
MotherElizabeth Godsell b. 21 Dec 1561, d. 1638
     John Barber alias Nynne was baptized on 13 February 1602 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England. He was the son of George Barber alias Nynne and Elizabeth Godsell.
John Barber alias Nynne is mentioned in the will of Henry Aderoll alias Skinner dated 6 July 1612 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1
John Barber alias Nynne is mentioned in the will of George Barber alias Nynne dated 18 January 1617 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.2
John Barber alias Nynne was a witness: Admon: 1635: Appeared personally Mr. William Aweret, notary public and procurator for John Barber als Nyn natural and legitimate brother of Mary Barber als Nyn late of Retherfield deceased and renounced administration of the goods and chattels of the said deceased .3
John Barber alias Nynne is mentioned in the will of Elizabeth Godsell dated 12 September 1637 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.4
The records for the “Relief of Irish Protestants 1642 – East Sussex Contributors” show John Barber in Rotherfield:
John Barber 1d.5
John Barber alias Nynne married Mary (?) circa 1646 at Sussex, England.
John's wife has been identified as Mary purely on the burial in 1662 which says "Mary, wife of John Barber, Retherfield", as the mother's name is not given on any of the children's baptisms. However, it is possible that Mary was a second wife as there is a marriage of John Barber to Joan Coarde on 16 Sep 1645 at Burwash. A Joan Goorde/Goarde/Gourde was baptised 30 Sep 1627 at Barcombe, daughter of Thomas. Another Joan Gord was baptised 30 Oct 1625 at East Grinstead, daughter of Henry and Margaret. These two would appear to be the only possibilities in the SFHG baptism index. While it is possible that Joan Coarde/Goard was John Barber of Rotherfield's first wife (the marriage date fits well with the children's births and no other family has been found for them), there is a burial of a John Barber on 23 Jan 1646 at Warbleton which could also account for him. There is also the marriage of John Barber and Margaret Comber on 21 May 1644 at Buxted which would also have to be a contender.6,7
John's wife Mary was buried on 20 June 1662 in Frant, and her burial entry reads "Mary, wife of John Barber, Rotherfield".8
John Barber alias Nynne married Eleanor Maynard, daughter of Arthur Maynard and Jane Chowne, on 10 September 1663 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.7
There are no other John Barbers of marriageable age in the area that could be the spouse of Eleanor Maynard. Eleanor would have been age 37 and therefore a marriage to a 61 year old widower seems possible.
John Barber alias Nynne died in 1667 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
John Barber alias Nynne was buried on 30 December 1667 at St Denys, Rotherfield, Sussex, England.9

Family 1

Mary (?) d. 1662
Marriage*
John Barber alias Nynne married Mary (?) circa 1646 at Sussex, England
Children

Family 2

Eleanor Maynard b. 23 Feb 1625/26, d. 1681
Marriage*
John Barber alias Nynne married Eleanor Maynard, daughter of Arthur Maynard and Jane Chowne, on 10 September 1663 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.7 
Children

Citations

  1. [S361] Will of Henry Aderoll alias Skynner of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 6 Jul 1612, proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 2 Nov 1613. (TNA: PROB 11/122/389).
  2. [S113] Will of George Nynne als Barber of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 18 Jan 1617, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 26 May 1627. (ESRO: PBT/1/1/20/40A).
  3. [S362] Letters of administration of the estate of Mary Barber of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, granted by the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 1635 (ESRO: W/B6/219).
  4. [S114] Will of Elizabeth Nyne als Barber of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 12 Sep 1637, proved in the Archdeaconry Court at Lewes, 3 Dec 1638. (ESRO: PBT/1/1/25/189).
  5. [S110] M J Burchall ed. "East Sussex Contributors to the relief of Irish Protestants 1642", Sussex Genealogical Centre, Occasional Paper No 10, First Edition (1984).
  6. [S23] Index to Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.
  7. [S24] Index to Marriages, 1538-1837, Compact Disc SFHGCD003, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, 2008.
  8. [S122] Transcript of the Parish Register of Frant, Sussex, England, 1544-1881 (ESRO: PAR 344/1).
  9. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) "GS Film number: 1468914."

Frances Barber alias Nynne

b. 16 March 1588/89, d. 1648
FatherGeorge Barber alias Nynne b. c 1558, d. 1627
MotherElizabeth Godsell b. 21 Dec 1561, d. 1638
     Frances Barber alias Nynne was baptized on 16 March 1588/89 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1 She was the daughter of George Barber alias Nynne and Elizabeth Godsell.
Frances Barber alias Nynne is mentioned in the will of Henry Aderoll alias Skinner dated 6 July 1612 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.2
Frances Barber alias Nynne is mentioned in the will of George Barber alias Nynne dated 18 January 1617 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.3
Frances Barber alias Nynne is mentioned in the will of Elizabeth Godsell dated 12 September 1637 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.4
Frances Barber alias Nynne and Abednego Breade obtained a marriage licence on 6 March 1640/41 at Archdeaconry of Lewes, Sussex, England.
As of 6 March 1640/41, her married name was Breade.
Frances Barber alias Nynne married Abednego Breade on 11 March 1640/41 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
Frances Barber alias Nynne died in 1648 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
Frances Barber alias Nynne was buried on 22 September 1648 at St Denys, Rotherfield, Sussex, England, no first name, but "wife of Abednego Breed".5

Family

Abednego Breade
Marriage License*
Frances Barber alias Nynne and Abednego Breade obtained a marriage licence on 6 March 1640/41 at Archdeaconry of Lewes, Sussex, England
Marriage
Frances Barber alias Nynne married Abednego Breade on 11 March 1640/41 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England

Citations

  1. [S103] Transcript of the Parish Register of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, (ESRO: PAR 465/1/1/1).
  2. [S361] Will of Henry Aderoll alias Skynner of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 6 Jul 1612, proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 2 Nov 1613. (TNA: PROB 11/122/389).
  3. [S113] Will of George Nynne als Barber of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 18 Jan 1617, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 26 May 1627. (ESRO: PBT/1/1/20/40A).
  4. [S114] Will of Elizabeth Nyne als Barber of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 12 Sep 1637, proved in the Archdeaconry Court at Lewes, 3 Dec 1638. (ESRO: PBT/1/1/25/189).
  5. [S443] Rotherfield St Denys, Burials and MIs, undated, Rotherfield, Sussex (http://www.stdenysrotherfield.org.uk/familyhistory.htm).

Mary Barber alias Nynne

b. 16 March 1588/89, d. circa 1590
FatherGeorge Barber alias Nynne b. c 1558, d. 1627
MotherElizabeth Godsell b. 21 Dec 1561, d. 1638
     Mary Barber alias Nynne was baptized on 16 March 1588/89 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1 She was the daughter of George Barber alias Nynne and Elizabeth Godsell.
Mary Barber alias Nynne died circa 1590 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.

Citations

  1. [S103] Transcript of the Parish Register of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, (ESRO: PAR 465/1/1/1).

Mary Barber alias Nynne

b. 18 April 1591, d. 1594
FatherGeorge Barber alias Nynne b. c 1558, d. 1627
MotherElizabeth Godsell b. 21 Dec 1561, d. 1638
     Mary Barber alias Nynne was baptized on 18 April 1591 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1 She was the daughter of George Barber alias Nynne and Elizabeth Godsell.
Mary Barber alias Nynne died in 1594 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
Mary Barber alias Nynne was buried on 1 September 1594 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England, "Mary Nynne, d. of George."2

Citations

  1. [S103] Transcript of the Parish Register of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, (ESRO: PAR 465/1/1/1).
  2. [S443] Rotherfield St Denys, Burials and MIs, undated, Rotherfield, Sussex (http://www.stdenysrotherfield.org.uk/familyhistory.htm).

Elizabeth Barber alias Nynne

b. 15 December 1594
FatherGeorge Barber alias Nynne b. c 1558, d. 1627
MotherElizabeth Godsell b. 21 Dec 1561, d. 1638
     Elizabeth Barber alias Nynne was baptized on 15 December 1594 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1 She was the daughter of George Barber alias Nynne and Elizabeth Godsell.
Elizabeth Barber alias Nynne is mentioned in the will of Henry Aderoll alias Skinner dated 6 July 1612 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.2
Elizabeth Barber alias Nynne married William Bowden on 26 May 1622 at Horsmonden, Kent, England, Surname BARBER (no alias NYNNE). Elizabeth BOWDEN is mentioned as a daughter in her mother's will of 1637 thus confirming her married name. William Bowden is mentioned as a witness on her brother Thomas's marriage licence.3,4
As of 26 May 1622, her married name was Bowden.
Elizabeth Barber alias Nynne is mentioned in the will of George Barber alias Nynne dated 18 January 1617 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.5
Elizabeth Barber alias Nynne is mentioned in the will of Elizabeth Godsell dated 12 September 1637 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.6
The marriage record for Elizabeth's son William Bowden implies that Elizabeth remarried sometime after the death of her husband William in 1645 but before her son's marriage in 1656, as her son is referred to as William Bowden, son of Elizabeth Weston of Heathfield. However, there is a gap in the Ticehurst marriages in the Sussex Marriage Index for the period 1641-1653 and the marriage has not been found yet.
If the remarriage of Elizabeth to a WESTON is correct, there are two possible burials at Heathfield All Saints:
6 Oct 1663: ------- Weston, wife of old Weston
13 Oct 1666: ------- Weston, wife of John Senior.

Family

William Bowden d. 1645
Marriage*
Elizabeth Barber alias Nynne married William Bowden on 26 May 1622 at Horsmonden, Kent, England, Surname BARBER (no alias NYNNE). Elizabeth BOWDEN is mentioned as a daughter in her mother's will of 1637 thus confirming her married name. William Bowden is mentioned as a witness on her brother Thomas's marriage licence.3,4 
Children

Citations

  1. [S103] Transcript of the Parish Register of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, (ESRO: PAR 465/1/1/1).
  2. [S361] Will of Henry Aderoll alias Skynner of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 6 Jul 1612, proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 2 Nov 1613. (TNA: PROB 11/122/389).
  3. [S28] Will of Elizabeth Nynne als Barber of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 12 Sep 1637, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 3 Dec 1638. (ESRO: PBT/1/1/25/189).
  4. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) ""England Marriages, 1538–1973 ," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NLCQ-RZV : 10 December 2014), William Bowden and Elizabeth Barber, 26 May 1622; citing Horsmonden, Kent, England, reference ; FHL microfilm 992,521."
  5. [S113] Will of George Nynne als Barber of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 18 Jan 1617, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 26 May 1627. (ESRO: PBT/1/1/20/40A).
  6. [S114] Will of Elizabeth Nyne als Barber of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 12 Sep 1637, proved in the Archdeaconry Court at Lewes, 3 Dec 1638. (ESRO: PBT/1/1/25/189).

William Heath

d. October 1635
     William Heath was warriner of Frant in 1630.
Note that a warriner is a game or forest warden.
William Heath and Anne Latter obtained a marriage licence on 4 May 1630 at Archdeaconry of Lewes, Sussex, England, "William Heath of Fraunt, warriner, and Anne Latter of Retherfield, maiden: sureties, said W.H. and Thomas Foster of Clive near Lewes, inholder (St Mary Westout, Lewes)." Note that an inholder is an innkeeper. William gives his occupation as a warriner, which is a game or forest warden.1
William Heath married Anne Latter, daughter of Edmund Latter and Agnes A'Downe, on 4 May 1630 at St Mary Westout, Lewes, Sussex, England, (St Mary Westout is now called St Anne's).2
William Heath was a yeoman in 1635.
At the Rotherfield manorial court held on 6 April 1835:
"Comes William Heath and surrenders 1 cottage and 2 pieces of land adjacent, situated in the parish of Frant on the E. side of Eridge Parke between the fence of the said Parke & the highway there, formerly in occupation of Mark Couchman, besides all right estate claim & demand which the said Wm has in the premises for & during his life & the lives of Edward Munday & Margarite Heath, with intent that the lord shall re-grant the said cottage & premises as before mentioned And thereupon he at this court grants seisin by the lord to Richard Boakes senr, Richard Boakes his son & Anne Boakes his daughter of & in the cottage & 2 pieces of land to have & to hold the same to him R.B. snr & R.B. the son & A.B. & their assigns for & during their natural lives & of the .......? of them & the paying yealy to the lord & his heirs at the capital mess[uage] called Eridge Place 2 fat capons [a rooster or cockerel that has been castrated to improve the quality of its flesh for food ]or 3/- lawful English money. Heriot 3/- Fini £3.3"
The above entry in the manorial records raises the question as to who were Edward Munday and Margaret Heath? Intriguingly, there is a baptism of a Margaret Heath to a William Heath in November 1629 at St John the Baptist, Lewes. Unfortunately the mother's name is not given.
William Heath left a will made on 4 August 1635 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.4
‘In the name of god amen I William Heath of Rotherfeild in the Countie of Sussex yeoman being of pfect memorie doe this fourth daie of August in the Eleventh yeere of the Raigne of our soveraigne Charles [1635] by the grace of god Kinge of England Scotland France & Ireland defender of the faith &c make & declare this my last will and teastam’t in manner & forme following Inprimis I give [& devise – crossed out] my soule to god my Creator my bodie I will shalbe buried in the earth. Itm I give & devise unto my three Children Edmond Heath Robert Heath & Elizabeth Heath five pounds apeece to be paid to them at their sev’rall ages of one & twentie yeeres or daies of marriage wch shall first happen All the rest of my goods cattells [capital] & chattells whatsoever I give & devise unto Anne my loveing wife & I make & ordeine my said loveing wife sole executrix of this my last will & teastament In wittnes whereof I have hereunto sett my hand & seale the daie & yeare first abovewritten.
[signed]
Willm Heath.
Wittnes unto his will
Nicholas Jeames
Thomas Weller jun.’
[Latin] Probate 28 April 1636 on the oath of
Anne Heath, the relict of the said deceased and Executrix.
(Transcribed by Gillian Rickard for Geoffrey Barber, 2011.)4
William Heath died in October 1635 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
William Heath was buried on 25 October 1635 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.

Family

Anne Latter b. 11 Dec 1608, d. c 1675
Marriage License
William Heath and Anne Latter obtained a marriage licence on 4 May 1630 at Archdeaconry of Lewes, Sussex, England, "William Heath of Fraunt, warriner, and Anne Latter of Retherfield, maiden: sureties, said W.H. and Thomas Foster of Clive near Lewes, inholder (St Mary Westout, Lewes)." Note that an inholder is an innkeeper. William gives his occupation as a warriner, which is a game or forest warden.1 
Marriage*
William Heath married Anne Latter, daughter of Edmund Latter and Agnes A'Downe, on 4 May 1630 at St Mary Westout, Lewes, Sussex, England, (St Mary Westout is now called St Anne's).2 
Children

Citations

  1. [S115] Edwin H W Dunkin ed. "Sussex Record Society Vol 1: Calendar of Sussex Marriage Licences: Archdeaconry of Lewes 1586-1643", Sussex Record Society, First Edition (1901).
  2. [S123] Transcript of the Bishop's Transcripts of Lewes St Mary Westout, Sussex, England, (ESRO: PAR 411/1).
  3. [S464] Indexed translation of a court book of the manor of Rotherfield, 1631-1724 (ESRO: PAR 465/26/1/6) "p. 13b (pp. 18,19 of PDF)."
  4. [S125] Will of William Heath of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 4 Aug 1635, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 28 Apr 1636. (ESRO: PBT/1/1/24/84B).

Edmond Heath

b. 14 November 1630
FatherWilliam Heath d. Oct 1635
MotherAnne Latter b. 11 Dec 1608, d. c 1675
     Edmond Heath was baptized on 14 November 1630 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England. He was the son of William Heath and Anne Latter.
Edmond Heath is mentioned in the will of William Heath dated 4 August 1635 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1
No trace of siblings Edmond, Elizabeth and Robert Heath have been found in the records. It is very possible that they were brought up by their mother's family and changed their surname to Latter. There is some evidence to support this in the 1677 copyhold surrender and admittance between Thomas Barber and Edmund Latter in Rotherield. A close family relationship between the two seems likely, and this Edmund Latter could be Edmond Heath. This is speculative and one must be careful in jumping to conclusions as there were other Latter families in Rotherfield at that time. There is also a subsequent marriage at Rotherfield on 11 Jun 1678 of Edmund Latter and Mary Lashmar, and they had two children baptised in Rotherfield: Edmund bap. 8 Dec 1680 (buried 13 Jul 1688) and Humphry bap. 29 Jul 1685. There is a marriage licence in 1707: June 7 Humphrey LATTER of Rotherfield, mercer, & Mary LYTE of Groombridge, spinster.
There is also the potential marriage of Edmund's sister Elizabeth at Rotherfield in Oct 1654 when banns were read at Rotherfield St Denys between Elizabeth Latter and Matthew Tapley of Yalding, Kent (near Tonbridge). Their grandfather, Edmund Latter, died in Tonbridge in 1655.2

Citations

  1. [S125] Will of William Heath of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 4 Aug 1635, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 28 Apr 1636. (ESRO: PBT/1/1/24/84B).
  2. [S107] CourtRolls of the manor of Rotherfield, 1631-1753 (ESRO: ABE 74O1) page 252.

Elizabeth Heath

b. 19 May 1633
FatherWilliam Heath d. Oct 1635
MotherAnne Latter b. 11 Dec 1608, d. c 1675
     Elizabeth Heath was baptized on 19 May 1633 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England. She was the daughter of William Heath and Anne Latter.
Elizabeth Heath is mentioned in the will of William Heath dated 4 August 1635 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1
No trace of siblings Edmond, Elizabeth and Robert Heath have been found in the records. It is very possible that they were brought up by their mother's family and changed their surname to Latter. There is some evidence to support this in the 1677 copyhold surrender and admittance between Thomas Barber and Edmund Latter in Rotherield. A close family relationship between the two seems likely, and this Edmund Latter could be Edmond Heath. This is speculative and one must be careful in jumping to conclusions as there were other Latter families in Rotherfield at that time. There is also a subsequent marriage at Rotherfield on 11 Jun 1678 of Edmund Latter and Mary Lashmar, and they had two children baptised in Rotherfield: Edmund bap. 8 Dec 1680 (buried 13 Jul 1688) and Humphry bap. 29 Jul 1685.
There is also the potential marriage of Elizabeth (Heath?) at Rotherfield in Oct 1654 when banns were read at Rotherfield St Denys between Elizabeth Latter and Matthew Tapley of Yalding, Kent (near Tonbridge). Their grandfather, Edmund Latter, died in Tonbridge in 1655.2

Citations

  1. [S125] Will of William Heath of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 4 Aug 1635, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 28 Apr 1636. (ESRO: PBT/1/1/24/84B).
  2. [S107] CourtRolls of the manor of Rotherfield, 1631-1753 (ESRO: ABE 74O1) page 252.

Robert Heath

b. 8 March 1634/35
FatherWilliam Heath d. Oct 1635
MotherAnne Latter b. 11 Dec 1608, d. c 1675
     Robert Heath was baptized on 8 March 1634/35 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England. He was the son of William Heath and Anne Latter.
Robert Heath is mentioned in the will of William Heath dated 4 August 1635 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.1
No trace of siblings Edmond, Elizabeth and Robert Heath have been found in the records. It is very possible that they were brought up by their mother's family and changed their surname to Latter. There is some evidence to support this in the 1677 copyhold surrender and admittance between Thomas Barber and Edmund Latter in Rotherield. A close family relationship between the two seems likely, and this Edmund Latter could be Edmond Heath. This is speculative and one must be careful in jumping to conclusions as there were other Latter families in Rotherfield at that time. There is also a subsequent marriage at Rotherfield on 11 Jun 1678 of Edmund Latter and Mary Lashmar, and they had two children baptised in Rotherfield: Edmund bap. 8 Dec 1680 (buried 13 Jul 1688) and Humphry bap. 29 Jul 1685.
There is also the potential marriage of Robert's sister Elizabeth at Rotherfield in Oct 1654 when banns were read at Rotherfield St Denys between Elizabeth Latter and Matthew Tapley of Yalding, Kent (near Tonbridge). Their grandfather, Edmund Latter, died in Tonbridge in 1655.2

Citations

  1. [S125] Will of William Heath of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, made 4 Aug 1635, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 28 Apr 1636. (ESRO: PBT/1/1/24/84B).
  2. [S107] CourtRolls of the manor of Rotherfield, 1631-1753 (ESRO: ABE 74O1) page 252.

Edmund Latter

b. circa 1575, d. 1656
FatherEdmund Latter b. c 1550, d. a 1605
     Edmund Latter was born circa 1575 at England. He was the son of Edmund Latter.
John and Edmund Latter are probably related, possibly brothers. This John Latter was the one known as "senior" and Edmund's son John as "junior".
Edmund Latter was a husbandman on 20 November 1602.
Edmund Latter and Agnes A'Downe obtained a marriage licence on 20 November 1602 at Archdeaconry of Lewes, Sussex, England, Agnes is a widow (Agnes Alchorne). Sponsor John Pemell mercer of Lewes.1
Edmund Latter married Agnes A'Downe, daughter of William A'Downe and Eleanor Saxbyes, on 7 December 1602 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England, The marriage is recorded as Edmond Latter married Annis Allchorne, widow.1
Edmund was given the property called Salters on his marriage to the widow Agnes Alchorne. It was probably part of a marriage settlement (agreement). The manorial records record the transaction:
1602
At this court it is found that Edmund Latter out of court since last court Nov 4th, 45 Eliz [1602] surrendered 1 messuage, 1 barn with garden & 2 pieces or parcels of land containing 4 acres lying at Town Rowe with appurtenances except 1 garden called le forge garden To use of said Edmund Latter his son & Agnes Alchorne widow & the heirs of said Edmund his son But his admission is postponed till next court. And nothing falls for heriot because he remains tenant
1603
At this court comes Edmund Latter & Agnes now his wife & pray out of the lord’s hand a messuage, a barn, a garden & 2 parcels of land containing 4 acres lying at Town Rowe with appurtenances in Rotherfield except a garden called Forge garden which formerly came into the lord’s hand by the surrender of Edmund Latter father of the son Edmund to the use of the said Edmund the son & Agnes To which said Edmund Latter the son & Agnes his wife the lord at this court grants seisin by the rod etc. And they give the lord for fine £6[?] etc.
Note: This entry is difficult to date from Pullein’s transcription but must be after Edmund Latter’s marriage to Agnes Alchorne on 7 Dec 1602 and the entry is after a View of Frankpledge court held 7th May 1603.2
At the Rotherfield manorial court held 27 Apr 1638, Edmund Latter transfered the property called Salters at Townrowe [Town Row] in Rotherfield to his son William Latter & Elizabeth his wife & his lawful heirs. William had married Elizabeth Coe on 30 May 1637. It is possible that this is the time Edmund moved to Tonbridge where he died in 1656.
Edmund Latter was a yeoman in 1654.
Edmund Latter left a will made on 20 January 1654/55 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.3
‘In the name of God Amen The twentieth day of January in the yeare of our Lord God one thousand sixe hundred fiftye and fower I Edmund Latter of Tonbridge in the County of Kent yeoman beinge at this present weake in bodye but of perfect and sounde memorie praised be God doe make and declare this to be my Testament and last will in manner and forme followinge First I will and resigne my soule to God that gave it And my bodie I commit to the earth hopeinge to have a ioyfull resurrection thereof to eternall life by my Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ And for that temporall estate which God hath lent me I will and dispose of the same as followeth (that is to saie) I will to Alice my daughter wife to Henry Marten Twenty shillinges of lawfull English money And to the said Henry Marten I give all my wearinge apparell whatsoever to be paid and delivered unto them upon their reasonable demannd by myne Executrix Alsoe I will and give to Robert Martyn sonne of the said Alice my daughter the sume of five poundes of lawfull English money to be paid unto him within one yeare next after my decease by mine Executrix Alsoe I will and give to Anne my daughter in remembrance of her Twentye shillinges to be paid unto her upon her demannd thereof Alsoe I will and give to Edmund Latter my grandchild sonne of John Latter my sonne deceased the sume of five poundes of lawfull money (of England) to be paid unto him at his age of one and twentie yeares if he shall live to attaine that age by mine Executrix. Alsoe I will and give to John Latter my grandchild sonne of the said John my sonne deceased the like summe of five poundes of lawfull money To be paid unto him at his age of one andTwentie yeares if he shall live to attaine that age by mine Executrix. Alsoe I will and give to Richard Latter my brother my redd cowe to be delivered to him by myne executrix w’thin short tyme after my decease. Alsoe I will and give to my godson John Moyse Tenne shillinges to be paid unto him at his age of one and twentie yeares if he live to attaine that age by myne Executrix. Alsoe all my moveable goodes Cattle [capital] houshold stuffe readie money debtes and chattles whatsoever and of what nature or kinde soever I wholie give leave and bequeath to Anne my deare and loveinge wife to enable her to pay my debts and legacies and to recompence her love and great paines by her shewed towards me And I make and ordeine the said Anne my wife to be the full and sole Executrix of this my Testament and last will In wittnes whereof I the said Edmund Latter have to this my Testament and last will sett my hand and seale the day and yeare first above written. Edmund Latter. Read, sealed, published and declared by the said Edmund Latter to be his Testament and last will in the presence of Robert Weare, William Moyse his marke, Geo: Hooper.
This will was proved at London before the Judges for probate of wills and grannting administracons lawfullie authorized the second day of January in the yeare of our Lord God one thousand sixe hundred and fiftye sixe by the oathe of
Anne Latter the Relict and sole Executrix named in the last will and Testament of the said deceased To whome was grannted administracon &c she beinge by vertue of a Commission first legally sworne truely and faithfully to administer.’
(Transcribed by Gillian Rickard for Geoffrey Barber, 2011.)
The connection to Rotherfield is confirmed in the will as Anne’s sister Alice is mentioned as being married to Henry Marten. The Sussex Marriage Index has the marriage: Alice Latter married Henry Martin at Rotherfield on 26 January 1624.1
Edmund Latter died in 1656 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.
Edmund Latter was buried on 11 May 1656 at St Peter & St Paul, Tonbridge, Kent, England.4
His estate was probated on 2 January 1656/57 at Prerogative Court of Canterbury, London, Middlesex, England.

Family

Agnes A'Downe b. 19 Nov 1570
Marriage License
Edmund Latter and Agnes A'Downe obtained a marriage licence on 20 November 1602 at Archdeaconry of Lewes, Sussex, England, Agnes is a widow (Agnes Alchorne). Sponsor John Pemell mercer of Lewes.1 
Marriage*
Edmund Latter married Agnes A'Downe, daughter of William A'Downe and Eleanor Saxbyes, on 7 December 1602 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England, The marriage is recorded as Edmond Latter married Annis Allchorne, widow.1 
Children

Citations

  1. [S24] Index to Marriages, 1538-1837, Compact Disc SFHGCD003, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, 2008.
  2. [S451] Indexed translation of a court book of the manor of Rotherfield, 1593-1606 (ESRO: PAR 465/26/1/4) "p.126 (p. 107 of PDF) and p.135 (p. 114 of PDF)."
  3. [S135] Will of Edmund Latter of Tonbridge, Kent, England, made 20 Jan 1654, proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 2 Jan 1656. (TNA: PROB 11/261/251).
  4. [S238] Transcript of the Parish Register of Tonbridge, Kent, England, 1547-1730 (KHLC: P371) "P371/1/A/3 Kent Burials 1559-1687."

Agnes A'Downe

b. 19 November 1570
FatherWilliam A'Downe b. c 1530, d. 1580
MotherEleanor Saxbyes b. c 1530, d. 1610
     Agnes A'Downe was born in 1570 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England.
Agnes A'Downe was baptized on 19 November 1570 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England, Annis or Agnes, surname DOWNE. Only the father, William Downe is given.1
The list of churchwardens for Rotherfield records John a Downe 1519-21, and William a Downe 1525-26, and one of these is likely to be her grandfather or great grandfather.2,3 She was the daughter of William A'Downe and Eleanor Saxbyes.
Agnes A'Downe and Isaac Alchorne obtained a marriage licence on 17 December 1599 at Archdeaconry of Lewes, Sussex, England, 17 Dec 1599, Isaac Alchorne yeoman of Retherfield & Agnes Adowne of same, maiden; sureties said IA and Edward ADOWNE of same, yeoman, brother of the maiden
This is the licence to marry and the actual marriage in a church has not been found and is not in the Rotherfield parish register transcripts.4,5,6
As of 17 December 1599, her married name was Alchorne.
Isaac Alchorne was probably born at Rotherfield in about 1551 although there is no surviving record of his baptism. Isaac married Joan Alchorne at St Denys’ church, Rotherfield on 16th May 1580. Joan was born in about 1558 the youngest (?) daughter of John Alchorne of Adams and his wife Margery.
When his father Thomas Alchorne died in 1558 he bequeathed to Isaac ‘a tenement at Town Row, four swynes of land of the ferling of Town Frith, two swynes of the ferling of Dodd Frith, half an acre of Longley ferling, and twenty-five acres at Towngate, all of which lay in the east of the parish, several miles distant from Alchorne Manor.’
Below: An email received from Dr Robin Fox of Rotherfield in October 2005. Dr Fox is the present owner of Green House, Rotherfield believed to have been built by Isaac Alchorne during the reign of Queen Elizabeth the First:
I see that the Alchornes of Rotherfield feature on your website, so I thought you might be interested in the story of my house. The Alchornes have gone, but the family may remain in the ancestral memory of the beetles that survive in the timber. The house - oak-framed with large central chimney stack (now leaning perilously) - has been dated to 1580 or thereabouts. My father bought the place in 1935 and in the 1970s made some inquiries at the archive office in Lewes. In 1540 four Alchorne (or Allchin) men had children baptised or buried at Rotherfield, one being Thomas Alchorne of Town Row. In 1558 Thomas Alchorne bequeathed to his son Isaac a tenement at Town Row and 25 acres. We think it was Isaac who built our house. In 1580 Isaac married Joan Alchorne (a cousin, presumably), who next year inherited from her father John, a yeoman, part of Alchorne Manor (Adams Farm). Probably the couple thenceforward lived at Adams Farm, not Town Row. Joan bore Isaac four children - son d. 1581, Elizabeth bapt. 1586, John (bapt.1589-90), daughter - and died in 1593-4. Isaac married again twice, having a son Adam by Barbara Lockyer and a posthumous son Isaac by Agnes Adoune. After Isaac's death in 1601, the property was left to John and his stepbrother Isaac. Although John spent his childhood at Town Row (which was managed by the husband of his aunt Elizabeth) he seems to have decamped later to Adams Farm. Probably it was this John who sold the property (to John Chiesman) in 1651.The main part of the house has not changed greatly since Elizabethan times, and current repairs to the main chimney will expose brickwork that has not been touched since it was laid under the supervision of Isaac Allchin more than 400 years ago.
Isaac and Joan had at least four children – son (1581), Elizabeth (1586), John (1590) and daughter (1594). Joan was buried at Rotherfield on 28th January 1595 at the age of about 40 years.
Isaac subsequently married Barbara Lockyer at St Denys’ church, Rotherfield in 1596; she was born at Rotherfield in about 1575. Isaac and Barbara had at least one child – Adam (1597). In 1597 Isaac ‘held by deed tenement and land called Alchornes Newland and Old Rede comprising 60 acres. His land was adjacent to Crowbarrow (now Crowborough) Common and was bounded on the other side by the Queen’s highway. Barbara died in 1599 aged about 24 years.
Isaac then married Agnes Adowne at St Denys’ church, Rotherfield on 17th December 1599; Isaac and Agnes had at least one child – Isaac in 1601. However Isaac died in August 1601 aged about 51 years. Isaac bequeathed the bulk of his property to his sons John and Isaac. Source: http://www.alchin.info/volume1/volume1_004_part1b_descendants_isaac_alchorne.html.

Agnes A'Downe and Edmund Latter obtained a marriage licence on 20 November 1602 at Archdeaconry of Lewes, Sussex, England, Agnes is a widow (Agnes Alchorne). Sponsor John Pemell mercer of Lewes.7
Agnes A'Downe married Edmund Latter, son of Edmund Latter, on 7 December 1602 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England, The marriage is recorded as Edmond Latter married Annis Allchorne, widow.7
As of 7 December 1602, her married name was Latter.
Agnes A'Downe is mentioned in the will of Edmund Latter dated 20 January 1654/55 at Tonbridge, Kent, England.8

Family 1

Isaac Alchorne b. c 1551, d. 13 Jun 1601
Marriage License
Agnes A'Downe and Isaac Alchorne obtained a marriage licence on 17 December 1599 at Archdeaconry of Lewes, Sussex, England, 17 Dec 1599, Isaac Alchorne yeoman of Retherfield & Agnes Adowne of same, maiden; sureties said IA and Edward ADOWNE of same, yeoman, brother of the maiden
This is the licence to marry and the actual marriage in a church has not been found and is not in the Rotherfield parish register transcripts.4,5,6 
Child

Family 2

Edmund Latter b. c 1575, d. 1656
Marriage License
Agnes A'Downe and Edmund Latter obtained a marriage licence on 20 November 1602 at Archdeaconry of Lewes, Sussex, England, Agnes is a widow (Agnes Alchorne). Sponsor John Pemell mercer of Lewes.7 
Marriage*
Agnes A'Downe married Edmund Latter, son of Edmund Latter, on 7 December 1602 at Rotherfield, Sussex, England, The marriage is recorded as Edmond Latter married Annis Allchorne, widow.7 
Children

Citations

  1. [S23] Index to Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.
  2. [S103] Transcript of the Parish Register of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, (ESRO: PAR 465/1/1/1) "PAR 465/1/1/5."
  3. [S104] Catharine Pullein, "Rotherfield: The Story of Some Wealden Manors", Courier, First Edition (1928) "page 222."
  4. [S115] Edwin H W Dunkin ed. "Sussex Record Society Vol 1: Calendar of Sussex Marriage Licences: Archdeaconry of Lewes 1586-1643", Sussex Record Society, First Edition (1901) "page 32."
  5. [S103] Transcript of the Parish Register of Rotherfield, Sussex, England, (ESRO: PAR 465/1/1/1) "PAR 465/1/1/2."
  6. [S104] Catharine Pullein, "Rotherfield: The Story of Some Wealden Manors", Courier, First Edition (1928) "page 443,444."
  7. [S24] Index to Marriages, 1538-1837, Compact Disc SFHGCD003, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, 2008.
  8. [S135] Will of Edmund Latter of Tonbridge, Kent, England, made 20 Jan 1654, proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 2 Jan 1656. (TNA: PROB 11/261/251).

Jacob Webb

b. circa 1700
     Jacob Webb was born circa 1700 at Kent, England.
Possible baptisms for Jacob are:
2 Nov 1699 at Leigh, son of John Web.
14 Nov 1703 at Maidstone, son of Jacob Webb and Elizabeth.1,2
Jacob Webb married Elizabeth Maynard on 26 May 1723 at Hadlow, Kent, England, by banns.3,4

Family

Elizabeth Maynard b. c 1700
Marriage*
Jacob Webb married Elizabeth Maynard on 26 May 1723 at Hadlow, Kent, England, by banns.3,4 
Children

Citations

  1. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) ""England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NRC1-JLC : accessed 01 Nov 2014), Jacob Web, 02 Nov 1699; citing LEIGH,KENT,ENGLAND, reference ; FHL microfilm 992527."
  2. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) ""England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JSQN-4JM : accessed 01 Nov 2014), Jacob Webb, 14 Nov 1703; citing Maidstone, Kent, England, reference item 1; FHL microfilm 1736876."
  3. [S84] Transcript of the Parish Register of Hadlow, Kent, England, to 1758 (KHLC: TR 1335/1).
  4. [S248] Website "Rootsweb.ancestry.com Web Site" (http://rootsweb.ancestry.com/) "http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mrawson/…."

Elizabeth Maynard

b. circa 1700
     Elizabeth Maynard was born circa 1700 at Kent, England.
Vanessa Campbell's family tree in Ancestry.co.uk has a baptism for Elizabeth, 21 Sep 1704 at Otford, Kent dau. of Joseph and Sarah Maynard (Vanessa's tree - v3"). There are a number of other possibilities though.
Elizabeth Maynard married Jacob Webb on 26 May 1723 at Hadlow, Kent, England, by banns.1,2
As of 26 May 1723, her married name was Webb.

Family

Jacob Webb b. c 1700
Marriage*
Elizabeth Maynard married Jacob Webb on 26 May 1723 at Hadlow, Kent, England, by banns.1,2 
Children

Citations

  1. [S84] Transcript of the Parish Register of Hadlow, Kent, England, to 1758 (KHLC: TR 1335/1).
  2. [S248] Website "Rootsweb.ancestry.com Web Site" (http://rootsweb.ancestry.com/) "http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mrawson/…."

William Webb

b. 25 September 1726
FatherJacob Webb b. c 1700
MotherElizabeth Maynard b. c 1700
     William Webb was baptized on 25 September 1726 at Hadlow, Kent, England.1 He was the son of Jacob Webb and Elizabeth Maynard.
William Webb married Sarah Hollans on 29 March 1751 at Hadlow, Kent, England.2

Family

Sarah Hollans
Marriage*
William Webb married Sarah Hollans on 29 March 1751 at Hadlow, Kent, England.2 
Children

Citations

  1. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) ""England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/N1PK-8ZF : accessed 01 Nov 2014), Jacob Webb in entry for William, 25 Sep 1726; citing Hadlow, Kent, England, reference 2:2BJ50JD; FHL microfilm 992517."
  2. [S248] Website "Rootsweb.ancestry.com Web Site" (http://rootsweb.ancestry.com/) "http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mrawson/…."

Ann Webb

b. 19 March 1730
FatherJacob Webb b. c 1700
MotherElizabeth Maynard b. c 1700
     Ann Webb was baptized on 19 March 1730 at Hadlow, Kent, England.1 She was the daughter of Jacob Webb and Elizabeth Maynard.
Ann Webb married Abraham Luck on 30 September 1750 at Hadlow, Kent, England.2
As of 30 September 1750, her married name was Luck.

Family

Abraham Luck
Marriage*
Ann Webb married Abraham Luck on 30 September 1750 at Hadlow, Kent, England.2 

Citations

  1. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) ""England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/N1PK-8FM : accessed 01 Nov 2014), Jacob Webb in entry for Ann Webb, 19 Mar 1729; citing Hadlow, Kent, England, reference item 2; FHL microfilm 992517."
  2. [S248] Website "Rootsweb.ancestry.com Web Site" (http://rootsweb.ancestry.com/) "http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mrawson/…."

Mary Webb

b. 4 July 1736
FatherJacob Webb b. c 1700
MotherElizabeth Maynard b. c 1700
     Mary Webb was baptized on 4 July 1736 at Hadlow, Kent, England.1 She was the daughter of Jacob Webb and Elizabeth Maynard.
Mary Webb married Thomas Warnett on 10 May 1764 at Hadlow, Kent, England.2
As of 10 May 1764, her married name was Warnett.

Family

Thomas Warnett
Marriage*
Mary Webb married Thomas Warnett on 10 May 1764 at Hadlow, Kent, England.2 

Citations

  1. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) ""England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NYQN-N3V : accessed 01 Nov 2014), Jacob Webb in entry for Mary Webb, 04 Jul 1736; citing Hadlow, Kent, England, reference item 2; FHL microfilm 992517."
  2. [S248] Website "Rootsweb.ancestry.com Web Site" (http://rootsweb.ancestry.com/) "http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mrawson/…."

John Lipscomb

b. circa 1690, d. 1764
     John Lipscomb was born circa 1690 at Kent, England.
John Lipscomb married Mary Wimset on 21 April 1717 at Hadlow, Kent, England.1,2
John Lipscomb died in 1764 at Hadlow, Kent, England.
John Lipscomb was buried on 24 November 1764 at Hadlow, Kent, England.3

Family

Mary Wimset b. c 1695, d. 15 Jul 1769
Marriage*
John Lipscomb married Mary Wimset on 21 April 1717 at Hadlow, Kent, England.1,2 
Children

Citations

  1. [S84] Transcript of the Parish Register of Hadlow, Kent, England, to 1758 (KHLC: TR 1335/1).
  2. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) ""England Marriages, 1538–1973 ," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NLCS-KY9 : accessed 01 Nov 2014), John Lipscom and Mary Wimset, 21 Apr 1717; citing Hadlow, Kent, England, reference ; FHL microfilm 992517."
  3. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) "source film number     1469181."

Mary Wimset

b. circa 1695, d. 15 July 1769
     Mary Wimset was born circa 1695 at Kent, England.
Vanessa Campbell's family tree in Ancestry.co.uk has Mary's parents as possibly Thomas Wimset and Mary Drayner married 26 Mar 1695 at Benenden, Kent, although there is no baptism for Mary (Vanessa's tree - v3". Needs further work.
Mary Wimset married John Lipscomb on 21 April 1717 at Hadlow, Kent, England.1,2
As of 21 April 1717, her married name was Lipscomb.
Mary Wimset died on 15 July 1769 at Hadlow, Kent, England.3

Family

John Lipscomb b. c 1690, d. 1764
Marriage*
Mary Wimset married John Lipscomb on 21 April 1717 at Hadlow, Kent, England.1,2 
Children

Citations

  1. [S84] Transcript of the Parish Register of Hadlow, Kent, England, to 1758 (KHLC: TR 1335/1).
  2. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) ""England Marriages, 1538–1973 ," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NLCS-KY9 : accessed 01 Nov 2014), John Lipscom and Mary Wimset, 21 Apr 1717; citing Hadlow, Kent, England, reference ; FHL microfilm 992517."
  3. [S83] Microfilm of the Old Parochial Register of Baptisms, Marriages & Burials, Hadlow, Kent, England, (Film no: P163/1/2).

John Lipscomb

b. 20 October 1717
FatherJohn Lipscomb b. c 1690, d. 1764
MotherMary Wimset b. c 1695, d. 15 Jul 1769
     John Lipscomb was baptized on 20 October 1717 at Hadlow, Kent, England.1 He was the son of John Lipscomb and Mary Wimset.

Citations

  1. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) "GS Film number: 992517, Item 2."

Ann Lipscomb

b. 29 December 1723
FatherJohn Lipscomb b. c 1690, d. 1764
MotherMary Wimset b. c 1695, d. 15 Jul 1769
     Ann Lipscomb was baptized on 29 December 1723 at Hadlow, Kent, England.1 She was the daughter of John Lipscomb and Mary Wimset.
Ann Lipscomb married Thomas Pearson on 6 April 1749 at Tudeley, Kent, England, both of Capel.2,3
As of 6 April 1749, her married name was Pearson.

Family

Thomas Pearson
Marriage*
Ann Lipscomb married Thomas Pearson on 6 April 1749 at Tudeley, Kent, England, both of Capel.2,3 

Citations

  1. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) "GS Film number: 992517."
  2. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) "GS Film number: 1469268, Item 5."
  3. [S151] Index to West Kent Marriages, KFHS CD-ROM36, 1538-1812, compiled by Sydney Smith, 59 Friar Road, Orpington Kent BR5 2BW, England.

William Lipscomb

b. 24 September 1727
FatherJohn Lipscomb b. c 1690, d. 1764
MotherMary Wimset b. c 1695, d. 15 Jul 1769
     William Lipscomb was born in 1727 at Hadlow, Kent, England.
William Lipscomb was baptized on 24 September 1727 at Hadlow, Kent, England.1 He was the son of John Lipscomb and Mary Wimset.
William Lipscomb married Mary Cornfool on 2 October 1751 at Tonbridge, Kent, England, Note: West Kent marriage index has CORNFOOT.2,3
The parish register for Pembury was searched but there were no LIPSCOMBES. Pembury is near Tonbridge.

Family

Mary Cornfool b. c 1730
Marriage*
William Lipscomb married Mary Cornfool on 2 October 1751 at Tonbridge, Kent, England, Note: West Kent marriage index has CORNFOOT.2,3 
Children

Citations

  1. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) "GS Film number: 992517, Item 2."
  2. [S388] Website "FamilySearch" (http://www.familysearch.org/) "source film number     1469268."
  3. [S151] Index to West Kent Marriages, KFHS CD-ROM36, 1538-1812, compiled by Sydney Smith, 59 Friar Road, Orpington Kent BR5 2BW, England.