Walter Raymond Lampard

b. 11 December 1927, d. 11 September 2007
FatherFrederick George Lampard b. 22 Mar 1894, d. 8 Oct 1988
MotherLily Bailey b. 14 Feb 1897, d. 8 Aug 1972
     Walter Raymond Lampard was born on 11 December 1927 at Maylands, Western Australia, Australia. He was the son of Frederick George Lampard and Lily Bailey.
Walter Raymond Lampard married Patricia Mary Taylor, daughter of Arthur George Taylor and Ada Winifred Middleton, on 6 February 1954 at Victoria Park, Western Australia, Australia.
Walter Raymond Lampard died on 11 September 2007 at Duncraig, Western Australia, Australia, at age 79.

Family

Patricia Mary Taylor b. 25 Apr 1934, d. 13 Mar 2005
Marriage*
Walter Raymond Lampard married Patricia Mary Taylor, daughter of Arthur George Taylor and Ada Winifred Middleton, on 6 February 1954 at Victoria Park, Western Australia, Australia
Child

Barbara Anne Lampard

b. 17 April 1955, d. 8 April 1992
FatherWalter Raymond Lampard b. 11 Dec 1927, d. 11 Sep 2007
MotherPatricia Mary Taylor b. 25 Apr 1934, d. 13 Mar 2005
Barbara Lampard 1975.
     Barbara Anne Lampard was born on 17 April 1955 at Mt Lawley, Western Australia, Australia. She was the daughter of Walter Raymond Lampard and Patricia Mary Taylor.
As of 1 July 1978, her married name was Huntington.
Barbara Anne Lampard died on 8 April 1992 at Perth, Western Australia, Australia, at age 36. She died of breast cancer.

Esther Taylor

b. 25 June 1820
FatherAbraham Taylor b. 12 Oct 1783, d. 28 Feb 1861
MotherSarah Kennard b. 9 Nov 1788, d. a 7 Apr 1861
     Esther Taylor was born in 1820 at West Firle, Sussex, England.
Esther Taylor was baptized on 25 June 1820 at St Peter, West Firle, Sussex, England.1 She was the daughter of Abraham Taylor and Sarah Kennard.

Citations

  1. [S23] Index to Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.

Anne Taylor

b. 13 September 1818, d. 1829
FatherAbraham Taylor b. 12 Oct 1783, d. 28 Feb 1861
MotherSarah Kennard b. 9 Nov 1788, d. a 7 Apr 1861
     Anne Taylor was born in 1818 at West Firle, Sussex, England.
Anne Taylor was baptized on 13 September 1818 at St Peter, West Firle, Sussex, England.1 She was the daughter of Abraham Taylor and Sarah Kennard.
Anne Taylor died in 1829 at West Firle, Sussex, England.
Anne Taylor was buried on 31 December 1829 at West Firle, Sussex, England, 11 years old.2

Citations

  1. [S23] Index to Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.
  2. [S226] Baptisms, Marriages & Burials of West Firle, Sussex, England, (ESRO: PAR 328/1) "searched by Eve Oliver 1990."

Sarah Taylor

b. 26 June 1808
FatherAbraham Taylor b. 12 Oct 1783, d. 28 Feb 1861
MotherSarah Kennard b. 9 Nov 1788, d. a 7 Apr 1861
     Sarah Taylor was born in 1808 at West Firle, Sussex, England.
Sarah Taylor was baptized on 26 June 1808 at St Peter, West Firle, Sussex, England.1 She was the daughter of Abraham Taylor and Sarah Kennard.

Citations

  1. [S23] Index to Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.

Robert Barber

b. 6 July 1802, d. 4 February 1867
FatherThomas Barber b. 29 Mar 1775, d. 2 Jul 1857
MotherMary Lane b. c 1769, d. 21 Jun 1841
Cabinet said to made by Robert Barber as an apprentice. (Photo J.F. Barber 2012)
     Robert Barber was born on 6 July 1802 at Brighton, Sussex, England. He was the son of Thomas Barber and Mary Lane.
Robert Barber was baptized on 16 July 1802 at St Nicholas Church, Brighton, Sussex, England.1
He was a cabinet maker all his life, probably learning his trade from his father. He was a cabinet maker all his life and a corner cabinet said to have been made by him as an apprenticeship piece (c1820) has been passed down the family.
Robert Barber married Jane Holden, daughter of John Holden and Susanna Roofe, on 6 August 1821 at Hove, Sussex, England, He had just turned 19 years old and she was 18 years. According to the 1851 and 1861 census returns her occupation was a straw bonnet maker.2
Jane was the youngest child in her family and was 16 years old when her father was buried on 1 April 1819 at St Nicholas Church, Brighton. He appointed his friend Henry Laker, victualler, as trustee and made special provision for Jane in his will: "... from time to time pay and apply the Interest thereof and such part of the principal as he or they shall find necessary or think proper for and toward the support, maintenance, education and bringing up of my youngest child Jane Holden until she shall attain the age of 21 years or be married or be otherwise provided for whichever shall first happen". Her mother Susanna and Henry Laker were appointed executors. However, the will was not probated until 6 Dec 1824 (nearly 3 months after Susanna’s death) at which time the estate was valued at under £100. The will directed that this should be divided equally amongst Jane and her eight siblings.3
In 1980, a letter was received by Fred and Rita Barber, descendants of Robert and Jane's son John Barber, which contained a copy of the will of John Barber's son Charles. It also contained a detailed list of the "Brothers and Sisters of Grandfather Barber" being the children of Robert and Jane. It contains details of all births, including exact times, dates and places and it all fits with the information discovered from my own research. This implies that there must have been a family bible or similar which documented this information, as the level of detail goes beyond personal memory capabilities. The information from this letter has been incorporated into the database although it will probably never be able to be verified. The letter also intrigingly states "I have not yet found the Spanish connection but given time I hope I will".4
Robert and Jane moved to London sometime after 1824 and returned to Brighton in 1829. The children Elizabeth, Susannah and Mary were all born in London during this period but were all baptised together on their return at St Nicholas, Brighton on 2 August 1829. The document "Brothers & Sisters of Grandfather [John] Barber" gives the place of birth of these children as 111 Jermyn St, St James, Westminster, London, presumably their residence while in London. Interestingly, Jane's sister Mary Anne Bignell (nee Holden) is a widow living with her son, Henry Bignell (a licensed victualler) and family at 123 Jermyn St in the 1861 census. Needs further work to explore this connection.5,6,7
Robert's great grandson, Frederick Charles Barber, is reported to have said that Robert worked on the Royal Pavilion in Brighton. If this was true it would have to have been while he was quite young as the Royal Pavilion was built in three stages, initially commencing 1786 and with the final stage completed in 1822 when Robert would have been just 20 years old. However, if true then work on such a high status building could have led to similar work in London and thus explain his move there c1824.8
Robert and Jane's daughters Susannah and Mary were twins, born on 25 April 1826. There was a history of twins in the family with Jane's mother, Susanna Holden (nee Roofe), also having twins Edward and Thomas in 1794.9,6
On their return from London in 1829 they lived at Mt Sion Place in Brighton (probably no. 3 Mt Sion Place as this is where William, Emma and Anne were born). Robert was working as a cabinet maker.6
In the 1841 census they were living at Gardiner Street in Brighton (no. 21 according to birth of John Barber).5
In 1841 Robert and Jane's eldest daughter, Jane, became pregnant at the age of 17 years to James Goldsmith, also 17 years, and the couple were married as minors in Hampstead, London on 28 Dec 1841 possibly to avoid embarrassment. It appears that they stayed in London until the child was born before returning to Brighton. They had three children before Jane died in 1848 in Brighton of an acute skin infection. Her husband James remarried and emigrated to Victoria, Australia in 1853 with the children Samuel, James and Mary on the ship "Six Sisters". After some time in Geelong, the family travelled to the gold diggings at Ballarat where they lived at Bakery Hill, Ballarat East. The family were involved in the now famous Eureka Uprising of 1854 and during the brief battle daughter Mary Abigail was hidden down a mine shaft by her father. Mary's obituary in the Ballarat Courier newspaper in 1930 records: The late Mrs Barnett was living in Ballarat during the Eureka riots and was hidden by her father, Mr Goldsmith, in a hole with some other children at Bakery Hill. They were left there till after the riot. Mrs Barnett well remembers the fear she experienced whilst the shooting was in progress." James Goldsmith died in Melbourne in 1877 and many descendants of the family survive in Australia today.10,11
On 30 March 1851 Robert Barber and Jane Holden lived at 35 Queens Gardens, Brighton, Sussex, England.12
While working in service in London, their daughter Elizabeth Barber gave birth to an illegitimate son, Alfred Barber, on 28 Dec 1850 who was subsequently raised by Robert and Jane. The birth certificate for Alfred shows that he was born at 11 Gunn Yard, Aldgate and the mother was Elizabeth Barber of 38 Camomile St, London. No father was given. The 1851 census for 11 Gunn Yard, St Botolph, Aldgate has an Alfred Barber, 3 months, nurse child (i.e. no relation to the family he was with) born Middlesex, Aldgate. The 1851 census for All Hallows London Wall, Middlesex at 38 Camomile St has Elizabeth Barber, age 22 yrs, unmarried, servant, b. Brighton, Sussex. She is working for Saul and Sarah Yates whose eldest son Alfred (the likely father?) is aged 26 years. Both Saul and Alfred are solicitors. Alfred Yates (the likely father) died in 1851.13
Robert Barber is mentioned in the will of Thomas Barber dated 10 February 1855.14
On 13 Apr 1857, Saul and Sarah Yates emigrated to New Zealand with Elizabeth Barber on the ship "Dinapore" departing Gravesend and arriving Auckland on 5 Aug 1857. On the voyage Elizabeth met her future husband, George Tunnecliffe, and they married on 8 Aug 1857, 3 days after arriving in Auckland. In the 1861 census, Elizabeth's ten year old son Alfred is living with his grandparents Robert & Jane Barber in Brighton. Alfred's marriage certificate states his father is Robert Barber, a cabinet maker, who was actually his grandfather. In New Zealand, Elizabeth and George lived in the Taranaki region of North Island and had three surviving children all of whom married and had children.15
Robert's father died on 2 July 1857 leaving an estate valued at about £450. His house and furniture were left to Robert's sister Rebecca, with the remainder divided equally between her and Robert.14
On 7 April 1861 Robert Barber and Jane Holden lived at 23 Kensington Gardens, Brighton, Sussex, England.16
Two of Robert and Jane's sons married and had large families in Brighton. William Lane Barber married Ellen Nell in 1863 and they had eight children. John Barber married Susannah Victoria White in 1865 and they had nine children.
Despite the difficulties with daughters Jane and Elizabeth, Robert and Jane left a substantial legacy of children and grandchildren in Australia and New Zealand as well as Brighton. The history of this family remains a work in progress as we seek more information about their other daughters Mary, Susannah, Emma and Anne. It is likely that their stories will be revealed when other family historians discover their connection to Robert and Jane while working back on their family trees, just as it was for daughters Jane and Elizabeth.
Robert Barber witnessed the marriage of John Barber and Susannah Victoria White on 15 May 1865 at The Register Office, Brighton, Sussex, England.17
Robert Barber died on 4 February 1867 at 23 Kensington Gardens, Brighton, Sussex, England, at age 64. He died of bronchitis (6 days).18
In the 1871 census, the widowed Jane was living with daughter Rebecca and her husband William Ollive at 71 Upper North St, Brighton. Ten years later she was living in the Race Hill Workhouse in Brighton, age 79 years. Many of the people living there at that time were elderly people over the age of 60 years. The workhouse was often the only place that elderly people could go for nursing and care in old age and was not necessarily a sign of poverty and abandonment. She died in the workhouse on 28 October 1882 of heart disease (morbis cordis, some years) and asthma, aged 80 years.19,20,21

Family

Jane Holden b. 17 Oct 1802, d. 28 Oct 1882
Marriage*
Robert Barber married Jane Holden, daughter of John Holden and Susanna Roofe, on 6 August 1821 at Hove, Sussex, England, He had just turned 19 years old and she was 18 years. According to the 1851 and 1861 census returns her occupation was a straw bonnet maker.2 
Children

Citations

  1. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "Source Citation: Place: Brighton, Sussex, England; Collection: St Nicholas; -; Date Range: 1791 - 1812; Film Number: 1067105."
  2. [S24] Index to Marriages, 1538-1837, Compact Disc SFHGCD003, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, 2008.
  3. [S274] Will of John Holden of Brighton, Sussex, England, made 6 Apr 1813, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 6 Dec 1824. (ESRO: PBT 1/1/75/339).
  4. [S272] Copy of Letter from Victoria and Albert Griffiths, to Rita and Fred Barber, dated 1 June 1980 (GG Barber Private Archives, Perth, W. Australia) ""Brothers and Sisters of Grandfather [John] Barber" attached to letter."
  5. [S67] 1841 Census for England "HO107 piece 1121 folio 6/40 page 23."
  6. [S23] Index to Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.
  7. [S273] Will of Charles Barber of Brighton, Sussex, England, made 27 Sep 1978, proved in the Brighton, 15 May 1980. (800506812M).
  8. [S550] Sue Berry, "Georgian Brighton", Phillimore, First Edition (2005) unknown isbn "Chap. 5 - The Royal Pavilion."
  9. [S272] Copy of Letter from Victoria and Albert Griffiths, to Rita and Fred Barber, dated 1 June 1980 (GG Barber Private Archives, Perth, W. Australia).
  10. [S252] Ancestry.com Operations Inc., Assisted and Unassisted Passenger Lists, Victoria, Australia: 1839–1923 [database on-line].
  11. [S283] Webpage Ballarat Courier (http://trove.nla.gov.au/) "Monday 19th November 1930."
  12. [S16] 1851 Census for England "HO107 piece 1645 folio 748 page 32."
  13. [S141] General Register Office: Indexes to Deaths, Sep 1837 - 2006, "Oct-Dec 1851, City of London, Vol 2 Page 128."
  14. [S131] Will of Thomas Barber of Brighton, Sussex, England, made 10 Feb 1855, proved in the Archdeaconry court of Lewes, 10 Jul 1857. (ESRO: PBT 1/1/85/963).
  15. [S423] Website "New Zealand Yesteryears" (http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/index.html) "http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlists/…."
  16. [S68] 1861 Census for England, "RG09 piece 598 folio 64 page 34."
  17. [S60] Marriage certificate of John Barber and Susannah Victoria White, married 15 May 1865 in the Registration District of Brighton, Sussex, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 2b Page 381).
  18. [S259] Death certificate of Robert Barber, died 4 Feb 1867, registered 8 Feb 1867 in the Registration District of Brighton, Sussex, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 2b Page 155).
  19. [S81] Death certificate of Jane Barber, died 28 Oct 1882, registered 31 Oct 1882 in the Registration District of Brighton, Sussex, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 2b Page 131).
  20. [S70] 1881 Census for England, "RG11 piece 1090 folio 134 page 12."
  21. [S69] 1871 Census for England, "RG10 piece 1087 folio 46 page 17."

William White

b. 22 July 1804, d. 4 March 1854
FatherHenry White b. c 1766, d. 11 Mar 1843
MotherJane Gorring b. c 1782, d. 8 Jan 1846
     William White was born in 1804 at Ditchling, Sussex, England.
William White was baptized on 22 July 1804 at St Margaret, Ditchling, Sussex, England.1 He was the son of Henry White and Jane Gorring.
William White married Mary Wickens, daughter of Richard Wickens and Sarah Belchamber, on 23 April 1823 at Keymer, Sussex, England.2
It is interesting to note that William and Mary had two children, William and Henry, who died in Brighton but were buried in Edburton in 1832 and 1829 respectively. William's parents, Henry and Jane White would have been living there at that time.
William White was a labourer on 16 October 1831.3
On 16 October 1831 William White and Mary Wickens lived at Hereford St, Brighton, Sussex, England.4
In 1834 William White lived at Priest's buildings, Church Street, Brighton, Sussex, England.5
On 12 November 1837 William White lived at Leicaster St, Brighton, Sussex, England.6
William White was a servant on 12 November 1837.6
William White was a labourer on 7 June 1841.7
On 7 June 1841 William White and Mary Wickens lived at Bread St, Brighton, Sussex, England.7
On 19 January 1842 William White and Mary Wickens lived at 30 Sun Street, Brighton, Sussex, England.8
William White witnessed the death of Jane Gorring on 8 January 1846 at 59 Frederick St, Brighton, Sussex, England; widow of Henry White, labourer. She died of scirrhous stomach (stomach cancer.)9
William White was a labourer on 30 March 1851.10
On 30 March 1851 William White and Mary Wickens lived at 30 Sun St, Brighton, Sussex, England. Note that Sun St no longer exists.10
William White died on 4 March 1854 at 16 Nelson St, Brighton, Sussex, England, at age 49. He died of Hypochondriasis (once Delirium Tremens) and General Debility (4 months).
Delirium Tremens is a psychotic condition typical of withdrawal in chronic alcoholics, involving tremors, hallucinations, anxiety, and disorientation. Hypochondriasis is a technical term for hypochondria - worrying about having a serious illness.11,12
William White was buried on 10 March 1854 at Brighton St Nicholas, Brighton, Sussex, England, age 49 years, abode Nelson St.13
William White was a cellarman on 29 October 1854.14

Family

Mary Wickens b. 29 Jan 1804, d. a 1854
Marriage*
William White married Mary Wickens, daughter of Richard Wickens and Sarah Belchamber, on 23 April 1823 at Keymer, Sussex, England.2 
Children

Citations

  1. [S23] Index to Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.
  2. [S24] Index to Marriages, 1538-1837, Compact Disc SFHGCD003, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, 2008.
  3. [S23] Index to Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project, "daughter Christiana's baptism."
  4. [S23] Index to Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project, "daughter Christiana White's baptism."
  5. [S23] Index to Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project, "son George William White's baptism."
  6. [S23] Index to Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project, "daughter Susannah Victoria White's baptism."
  7. [S67] 1841 Census for England "HO107 piece 1121 folio 6/9 page 11."
  8. [S217] Birth certificate of Susannah White, born 19 Jan 1842, registered 28 Feb 1842 in the Registration District of Brighton, Sussex, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 7 Page 284).
  9. [S263] Death certificate of Jane White, died 8 Jan 1846, registered 14 Jan 1846 in the Registration District of Brighthelmston, Sussex, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 7 Page 182).
  10. [S16] 1851 Census for England "HO107 piece 1645 folio 57 page 6."
  11. [S141] General Register Office: Indexes to Deaths, Sep 1837 - 2006, "Jan-Mar 1854, Brighton, Vol 2b Page 136."
  12. [S573] Death certificate of Wiliam White, died 4 Mar 1854, registered 6 Mar 1854 in the Registration District of Brighthelmston, Sussex, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 2b Page 136).
  13. [S25] Index to Burials, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project, "age 49 years, abode Nelson St."
  14. [S751] Marriage certificate of George White and Mary Ann Salvage, married 29 Oct 1854 in the Registration District of Brighton, Sussex, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 2b Page 306).

Michael Godden

b. 10 February 1811, d. 11 May 1901
FatherMichael Godden b. 11 Oct 1767, d. 13 Feb 1851
MotherLucy Verrall b. 18 Oct 1778, d. 29 Oct 1858
     Michael Godden was born in 1811 at Eastbourne, Sussex, England.
Michael Godden was baptized on 10 February 1811 at St Mary, Eastbourne, Sussex, England.1 He was the son of Michael Godden and Lucy Verrall.
Michael Godden married Ruth Dunk, daughter of Joseph Dunk and Jane Marchant, on 25 September 1830 at Eastbourne, Sussex, England, both of Eastbourne.
Between 1831 and 1835 Michael Godden and Ruth Dunk lived at Meads, Eastbourne, Sussex, England, as recorded on John, Emma and Lucy's baptisms.
On 7 June 1841 Michael Godden and Ruth Dunk lived at Meads, Eastbourne, Sussex, England.2
Michael Godden was an agricultural labourer on 7 June 1841.2
Michael Godden was a labourer on 4 October 1844.3
On 30 March 1851 Michael Godden and Ruth Dunk lived at Baileys Cottage, Eastbourne, Sussex, England.4
On 7 April 1861 Michael Godden and Ruth Dunk lived at Mill Lane Cottage, Eastbourne, Sussex, England.
Michael Godden was an agricultural labourer foreman on 7 April 1861.
In the 1861 census, Michael and Ruth Godden have three grandchildren living with them - Alfred Godden (8 years), George Godden (4 years), and John Godden (1 year) all born in Eastbourne. Alfred is the illegitimate son of daughter Emma Godden. George was baptised 29 Mar 1857 the son of Michael and Sophy Godden (abode South St, labourer) and John William Godden was baptised 10 Jul 1859 son of Sophia Godden (no father given, abode Southbourne). George and John are still living with Michael and Ruth in the 1871 census along with grandchildren Katie Elizabeth Godden (8 years) and Robert Godden (6 years). Katie is the illegitimate daughter of Elizabeth Godden. Robert is likely Frederick Robert Godden baptised 22 Oct 1865 daughter of Elizabeth Godden (single woman). It seems that Michael and Ruth played a major role in raising the illegitimate children of their daughters!5,6
Eastbourne Gazette Published Wednesday 28th May 1862:
Accident
A serious accident occurred a few days ago to Michael Godden foreman to James Gorringe of Upperton farm, by which he sustained a fracture of the leg, both bones being broken just above the ankle. It appears he was endeavouring to secure a colt in one of the yards, when his foot accidentally got entangled in the rope, and before he could extricate himself he was thrown to the ground, and sustained the injury above mentioned. The leg was skilfully set the following day by R. Colegate, Esq., Surgeon, and the sufferer is now progressing favourably.
(Transcribed by R D Wilkins, February 2018.)
Michael Godden witnessed the marriage of William Godden and Ann Elizabeth Humphries on 5 March 1865 at Eastbourne, Sussex, England.7
On 2 April 1871 Michael Godden and Ruth Dunk lived at Ballis (Bailey's?) cottage, Willingdon, Sussex, England, next to the Crumble Bridge gatehouse and near the Lodge Inn. Today the area is called Tollgate Gardens, named in the 1960s after the tollgate that stood by the bridge over the Crumbles sewer on the road to Pevensey. Beyond this point the road was administered by the Horsebridge and Horeham Turnpike Trust.
Michael Godden was a labourer on 2 April 1871.
Michael Godden was a railway labourer on the London, Brighton and South Coast railway. on 6 November 1873.8,9
An article in the St Leonard Observer 8 Nov 1873 reports that Michael Godden left his wife Ruth at the Union as she was so ill and he could not look after her. The case was dismissed and Ruth died within days.9
Eastbourne Gazette published Wednesday 12th November 1873:
Board of Guardians
The usual fortnightly meeting of the Guardians was held at the boardroom of the Eastbourne Union on Friday last. The Rev T Lowe occupied the chair, and the other Guardians present were: - Messrs J Smith, W Brodie, and F Tuppen.
The case of Michael Godden - The Governor reported the death of Ruth Godden whose husband, was prosecuted by the guardians for having, after obtaining an order for himself and his wife, deserted her at the House and ran away - Mr Swift, referring to this case, which had been before himself and two other magistrates, said it appeared that Godden was a very respectable working man, and the evidence did not show any desertion, because the man had not only offered to contribute to her support but was at work when apprehended *. In an ordinary way where a man was earning 16s a week, and had a free house, relief of course would not be afforded, but Godden's he thought was an exceptional case, his wife, who was now dead, being ill, and quite disabled and he having no one to look after her. He lost a fortnight's work through being obliged to wait on her, and of course this could not go on. He therefore applied for an order, and being told he must break up his house before he could get one, he sold his furniture and left his house, and it appeared, lost his regular employment. When an order was given granted him, he frankly said he did not want to go in the House while he was still able to work, thus showing a very commendable spirit, and when he had taken his wife to the House, he went to his work, which was certainly not desertion, - Mr Brodie remarked that he understood the poor woman had been ill for some three years. The Chairman said it was certainly not at the instigation of the Guardians that Godden broke up his home - he did not believe the relieving officers were even aware that he meant to do it. The Guardians were trying to get his wife into the hospital, and in the meantime it appeared he sold up his home. - The relieving officers, Messrs Emary and Catt, were called in and questioned as to whether they told Godden he must break up his home. Both officers said they never mentioned such a thing, and Mr Catt explained that Godden said Mr Graham told him he must break up the home if he wanted to go into the House. Mr Emary said that what Mr Graham said was that he would not be able to get an order for his wife unless he went into the House himself. The Chairman remarked there was a great disparity between the statements made to the board and those made to the magistrates' which placed the Guardians in a somewhat unfair position, The matter was dropped.
*Working for the London Brighton and South Coast Railway.
The earlier case of desertion was thrown out by the magistrates having "quite failed to substantiate the offence" according to the bench.
(Transcribed by R D Wilkins, Feb 2018.)
Michael Godden was a labourer with the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway earning 18s per week. on 31 December 1877.10
Michael Godden married Ann Verrall on 15 April 1879 at St Mary, Eastbourne, Sussex, England.11
Michael Godden was a bath chairman on 3 April 1881.12
On 3 April 1881 Michael Godden and Ann Verrall lived at Lewes House, Calverly Road, Eastbourne, Sussex, England.12
Michael Godden was a bath chairman on 5 April 1891.13
On 5 April 1891 Michael Godden and Ann Verrall lived at 11 & 12 South St, Eastbourne, Sussex, England.13
On 1 November 1899 Michael Godden lived at East Sussex County Lunatic Asylum, Haywards Heath, Sussex, England, (admission.)14
On 31 March 1901 Michael Godden lived at East Sussex County Lunatic Asylum, Haywards Heath, Sussex, England, recorded as just "M.G.", a widower, bath chairman, age 89 years, lunatic.15
Michael Godden died on 11 May 1901 at Lunatic Asylum, Wivelsfield, Sussex, England, at age 90. "age 90 years". He died of senile decay.16

Family 1

Ruth Dunk b. 27 Jul 1807, d. 6 Nov 1873
Marriage*
Michael Godden married Ruth Dunk, daughter of Joseph Dunk and Jane Marchant, on 25 September 1830 at Eastbourne, Sussex, England, both of Eastbourne. 
Children

Family 2

Ann Verrall b. c 1819, d. 1892
Marriage*
Michael Godden married Ann Verrall on 15 April 1879 at St Mary, Eastbourne, Sussex, England.11 

Citations

  1. [S23] Index to Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.
  2. [S67] 1841 Census for England "HO107 piece 1114 folio 13/35 page 15."
  3. [S201] Birth certificate of William Godden, born 4 Oct 1844, registered 4 Nov 1844 in the Registration District of Eastbourne, Sussex, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 7 Page 320).
  4. [S16] 1851 Census for England "HO107 piece 1637 folio 164 page 39."
  5. [S69] 1871 Census for England, "RG10 piece 1038 folio 51 page 6."
  6. [S68] 1861 Census for England, "RG09 piece 567 folio 81 page 11."
  7. [S59] Marriage certificate of William Godden and Ann Elizabeth Humphries, married 5 Mar 1865 in the Registration District of Eastbourne, Sussex, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 2b Page 77).
  8. [S365] Death certificate of Ruth Godden, died 6 Nov 1873, registered 8 Nov 1873 in the Registration District of Eastbourne, Sussex, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 2b Page 38).
  9. [S599] Webpage St Leonard Observer "8 Nov 1873."
  10. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "UK, Railway Employment Records, 1833-1963."
  11. [S143] General Register Office: Indexes to Marriages, Sep 1837 - 2006, "Apr-Jun 1879, Eastbourne, Vol 2b Page 100."
  12. [S70] 1881 Census for England, "RG11 piece 1037 folio 97 page 42."
  13. [S71] 1891 Census for England "RG12 piece 772 folio 69 page 39."
  14. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "The National Archives of the UK; Kew, Surrey, England; Lunacy Patients Admission Registers; Class: MH 94; Piece: 35."
  15. [S72] 1901 Census for England "RG13 piece 913 folio 111 page 34."
  16. [S458] Death certificate of Michael Godden, died 11 May 1901, registered 20 May 1901 in the Registration District of Ditchling,Sussex, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 2b Page 107).

Benjamin Humphries

b. 15 October 1820, d. 4 October 1878
FatherHenry Humphries b. 14 Sep 1788, d. 8 Jul 1860
MotherDiana Lines b. 1 Dec 1793, d. 1833
Booklet published in 2016 about Benjamin Knibbs otherwise Humphries.
     Benjamin Humphries was born in 1820 at Finmere, Oxfordshire, England; place of birth as given in census records.
Benjamin Humphries was baptized on 15 October 1820 at Tingewick, Buckinghamshire, England. He was baptised as Benjamin Knibbs. He was the son of Henry Humphries and Diana Lines.
Benjamin Humphries was also known as Benjamin Knibbs.
There is a book by George Edward Meek, grandson of Benjamin Humphries titled "George Meek, Bath Chairman by Himself" which provides remarkable information about Benjamin Humphries and his second wife Elizabeth Moore. George Meek was born 1868 and raised by Benjamin and Elizabeth from 1871 after his parents and siblings emigrated to the USA, eventually returning in 1877. George was considered too weak to travel with them. Excerpts from the book are quoted here in italics.1
Benjamin .... "in his young days, while employed in London, he had taught himself to read and write. Later he had been in some sort of service under the last Duke of Buckingham at Stowe House, Buckinghamshire, but in what capacity I do not know. There used to be a good deal of talk of poachers and poaching, so I should say he was either an under-gamekeeper or one of their natural enemies — a poacher himself. When the Duke of Buckingham died there was a great sale at Stowe House, at which, I have heard my grandfather (Benjamin) say, a Lord Rothschild outbid the late Queen Victoria for a valuable bedstead. He himself bought some old Windsor chairs from the kitchen, which, with their brightly burnished brass crests — consisting of a sheaf of wheat surmounted by a crown and surrounded by a motto — were among the most familiar objects of my early childhood. When, in after years, my grandmother died and left them to me with the rest of her furniture, being out of work I was glad of the fancy price they fetched.1"
Benjamin Humphries married Elizabeth Bull, daughter of Thomas Bull and Martha Bandy, on 1 June 1841 at Tingewick, Buckinghamshire, England.2
On 1 June 1841 Benjamin Humphries and Elizabeth Bull lived at Tingewick, Buckinghamshire, England.2
On 7 June 1841 Benjamin Humphries and Elizabeth Bull lived at Tingewick, Buckinghamshire, England.3
Benjamin Humphries was an agricultural labourer on 7 June 1841.
Their children were baptised under the surname "Knibbs otherwise Humphries".
Benjamin Humphries was a labourer on 10 July 1843.4
On 20 April 1849 Benjamin's wife, Elizabeth, died and was buried in Finmere, Oxfordshire. He also lost his 1 month old son Henry on 12 May 1849. There were also deaths of two other "Humphries o'wise Knibbs" children in 1849 whose parents are unknown.
On 30 March 1851 Benjamin Humphries lived at Ludgershall, Buckinghamshire, England. He was a waggoner working on a property of 240 acres for Ralph & Jane Smith under the name KNIBBS. His future second wife, Elizabeth MOORE, is also living in the village with her widowed father and illegitimate son, Charles.
Benjamin Humphries married Elizabeth Moore, daughter of Thomas Moore and Martha (?), in 1852 at Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, England, surname HUMPHRY.5
There were no children from Benjamin Humphries second marriage to Elizabeth Moore.
Benjamin, Elizabeth and the three surviving children, Rose Hannah, Ann Elizabeth, and Sarah ... "came to the neighbourhood of Eastbourne (Sussex) from Buckinghamshire with a farmer named Paxton, who had taken a farm at Willingdon. Here they occupied an old flint cottage which stood upon the corner of the main road and Church Street where "Flint House" now stands. Leaving Mr. Paxton's service after a time my grandfather entered that of another farmer named Reid at Jevington. Here he did some poaching. My grandmother has often spoken of burying fur and feathers to elude the search of their cottage made for them by game- keepers. Butcher's meat was scarce and dear in the country in those days. I do not suppose my grandfather's wages were very high. There were three growing girls to be kept, and doubtless an occasional hare or partridge was acceptable."
The farmer named Paxton would have been John Paxton, baptised 14 Sep 1817 at Finmere, Oxfordshire and who married Mary Sadler on 18 May 1842 at Newton Purcell, Oxfordshire. He is listed in the 1861 census at Chalk Farm, Willingdon "a farmer of 1000 acres employing 30 labourers". John Paxton's parents Robert and Mary Paxton had "a farm of 870 acres employing 38 laboureres" in Mixbury, Oxfordshire (next to Finmere) according to the 1851 census. It would be interesting to know how John came to be in possession of Chalk Farm, which is doubtlessly where Benjamin worked.
The farmer named Reid at Jevington was likely John Reid at Street Farm. In the 1861 census he was a farmer of 377 acres employing 3 boys and 7 men. Street Farm is near the intersection of Jevington Road and Green Lane. A photograph of the cottage they lived in is shown in the local history book "Jevington, Wannock and Willingdon: A Portrait in Old Postcards and Photographs" by Rosalind Hodge.1,6
Regarding their cottage in Willingdon, Rosalind Hodge wrote on 11 Apr 2015: I just remembered the photo I attach taken 4 1/2 years ago showing the exact corner where the cottage stood. It shows you how it looks today with the Wheatsheaf and the boundary wall of Flint House/Five Gables to the right.
On 7 April 1861 Benjamin Humphries and Elizabeth Moore lived at Jevington, Sussex, England. They are in the 1861 census under the name NIBBS.
Benjamin Humphries was a carter on 7 April 1861.
"About 1862 my grandfather (Benjamin Humphries) moved into Eastbourne, where he entered the employment of James Peerless, the builder, as a carter. He stayed with him twelve years, receiving eighteen shillings per week wages. In '66 or '67 my father and mother (Benjamin's daughter, Sarah Humphries) became acquainted and were married.1"
In 1864 Benjamin Humphries and Elizabeth Moore lived at 11 Tower Street, Eastbourne, Sussex, England, Tower Street was in the roughest area of Eastbourne and home to many of Eastbourne’s Fishermen. The houses were very small and terraced. On a modern map St James Road (a close actually) leads to a block of flats called Gwent Court which is built on the site of Tower Street.7
Benjamin Humphries witnessed the marriage of William Godden and Ann Elizabeth Humphries on 5 March 1865 at Eastbourne, Sussex, England.8
Benjamin Humphries witnessed the marriage of Sarah Humphries and Joseph Edward Meek on 1 January 1868 at Eastbourne, Sussex, England.9
Benjamin Humphries witnessed the marriage of Rose Hannah Humphries and Richard Meek in 1869 at Eastbourne, Sussex, England; Her name was spelt Rosahannah HUMPHYRES.10
On 2 April 1871 Benjamin Humphries and Elizabeth Moore lived at 5 East St, Eastbourne, Sussex, England. They are in the 1871 census under the name NIBBS.
Benjamin Humphries was a labourer (jobbing) on 2 April 1871.
In March(?) 1871 Benjamin's daughter Sarah and family emigrated to the USA leaving their son George Edward Meek and Sarah's sister Rosanna's son Benjamin Henry (Harry) Meek with their grandparents, Benjamin and Elizabeth.
C1870's ..... "My home life during this period was very happy. My grandparents were very good to me, and although we were poor we never knew what it was to want. My grandmother went out to work occasionally, but not, I think, regularly. I can remember her at a laundry in Cavendish Place, where I was anxious to turn the mangle; but I remember more distinctly her lace-making. She had a "pillow" and boxes of "bobbins," and with these she made excellent hand lace. She told me in after years that she used to sit on the beach in front of the Grand Parade with this work in the summer time and that she found some good customers for it among the passing gentry. I remember that one day she went over the rocks close to the Wish Tower to gather limpets, and that she fell and cut her face dread- fully. ...... Part of the time we lived in a little two-roomed cottage in a yard, or "close," off Grove Road. This has since been demolished. Here, I remember, my grandfather brought out his gun and shot some starlings, which he had, baked in a pie, for supper. I think I must have been left by myself a great deal, or at most with my cousin, a lad who at that time could not have been more than seven or eight years old. There are recollections of lonely meals I ate, of no care except from him, of long evenings spent waiting for grandfather and grandmother to come home. They always came home sober. I do not remember seeing my grandfather the worse for drink except on one occasion, and that was on a Christmas Day. He had a glass or two of ale every day, but I gather that he never exceeded. My grandmother was never addicted to drink. She was careful, fond of her home, making no silly pretensions, but just anxious to live a quiet, comfortable life. One incident I recall with reference to her at this time. She had bought a new pair of boots at a local shop on a Saturday night. On Sunday she and grand- father went for a walk along the sands, and the soles of her new boots fell off! She loomed very large in my early days. When she was at home I spent most of my out- of-school hours with her. When I was sick — I remember only one occasion, when I had the measles — she nursed me, giving me, by the doctor's orders, port wine, a drink which I pre- ferred very much to the nasty medicine. For some years afterwards whenever I felt I wanted something particularly nice I complained of feeling ill, and begged for more port wine. Then I had trouble with my teeth, which she tried to relieve by rubbing my gums with coarse salt. Also there were warm baths and shower baths, the latter administered by means of a garden watering-pot; nauseous castor-oil every now and then; pennies for sweets, which were often spent in children's books. Of these I acquired quite a large collection, and my grandfather bound them into one large volume. I suppose I could not read very well at that time, as I used to get him, when I bought a new book, to read it to me. The last year or two of our stay in Eastbourne we occupied three back rooms in a house in Cross Street, for which, I understand, my people paid four shillings and sixpence per week. While we were there the notable fire at Peerless' yard occurred. It was my habit on fine days, though I was very young, to go up and meet my grandfather in the evening when his work was done. I believe I spent much of my spare time with him. I remember going to the brick-yards with him, where I used to watch him load his cart with bricks. He put on his hands a pair of leather things like gloves with no backs to them. Then a man would throw bricks to him, three at a time, from a large stack; these he caught, piling them in his cart. It was amusing when I walked home with him to hear the tramp, tramp of his great hob- nailed boots and the pitter, patter of my little ones.1"
On 6 October 1872 Benjamin Humphries and Elizabeth Moore lived at South St, Eastbourne, Sussex, England.11
"In 1874, when I was six years old, my grand- father gave up his place at Peerless the builder's and took service as ploughman with a farmer named Edwards at Jevington, a village five miles over the hills and seven miles by road from Eastbourne. My grandfather was allowed the use of a farm wagon to remove our furniture from Eastbourne to Jevington. This, drawn by three huge brown horses whose names I subsequently learned were "Cubit," "Captain" and "Smiler," caused me great wonder. It had no tail-board at the back, simply a wooden bar across the top from side to side, and at the bottom a roller, through two holes in which long loose pegs were passed. This, I learned afterwards, was used when the wagon was loaded very high (with hay or com, for in- stance) to tighten the ropes which were passed over it from the front. The horses were gay with much jingling, brightly burnished brass about their harness, and blue, red and yellow ribbons on their bridles. I, my grandmother and my cousin Harry rode on top of the furniture. I do not remember much of the journey, except that when we had passed Wannock Glen my cousin got down and gathered a large bunch of primroses for me, so it must have been in the early spring. It is curious how little incidents of this kind are retained in the memory. I can see him now, a rough-clad little boy, handing the big bunch of yellow flowers up to me as I sat on the wagon. When we reached our little cottage we found there was no fire-grate in it. A broken one was borrowed. This had to be kept upright with two or three loose bricks. It had originally been a four-legged affair, but two of the legs had been broken off. We made shift with this for a time until a new one was bought. When my grand- mother wanted to make a cake for Sunday's tea, and was not using the large brick oven in the washhouse, she baked it by placing it under the grate with a sheet of tin over it to keep the ashes from falling into it. This cottage can still be seen. It stands on the right, just inside the upper end of the village, opposite a large barn. They found that my cousin Harry was not needed, so they sent him into the workhouse. But he was not there long. My grandfather, much to my delight, fetched him out to be his ploughboy. Poor Harry never had much education.1"
In the autumn and winter my grandfather would go rabbit-shooting (he had the farmer's permission to do so over some downland), and often brought six or eight brace home with him, but I never remember seeing him with a partridge or pheasant, or even a hare. He was fond of animals, of his horses and our domestic pets, which consisted of a tabby cat, a blackbird, a goldfinch and a number of tame rabbits.1

The cottage had about ten rods of garden attached. This ran down the side, the larger part given over to vegetables, but a long slip of it under a wall contained, among other things, flowers the seeds of which had been sent us from Ohio. This was my grandmother's special care. One year we tried to grow some Indian corn, but though it grew very high and the ears developed, it never fully ripened. People passing in carriages would often stop to buy a bunch of flowers. My grandmother insisted always that only sweet-smelling ones were worth having, consequently in the summer her garden scented the whole place. There was a pear tree, the special resting-place, I used to think, of our cat, and in the wall, serving the two houses, a well, from the depths of which the buckets some-times brought up bright-coloured lizards with the water. The neighbours once gave me so much honey it made me ill.1

"On December 6, 1876, my grandfather received a telegram from Brooklyn, N. Y., saying that a theatre had been burnt down, and my father had been one of the audience. Shortly after- wards a letter in a black-bordered envelope came from my mother. My grandfather was threshing oats with a flail in one of the bams. I was sent to him with it, and directly he saw it he broke down and cried like a child, for my father had been killed in the fire.1"
In 1877 Sarah Meek and children returned to Eastbourne from the USA after the death of Sarah's husband, Joseph Edward Meek, in December 1876.
Benjamin Humphries died on 4 October 1878 at Lower Willingdon, Willingdon, Sussex, England, at age 57. He died of pneumonia (6 days.)12
Benjamin Humphries was buried on 8 October 1878 at St Mary, Willingdon, Sussex, England.13
But alas! and alas! my happy days — happy in spite of canings and motherly frowns — were numbered. My grandfather quarrelled with the farmer for whom he worked at Jevington, and taking service with another over the hills in a neighbouring village, had only been with him three weeks when he died of bronchitis, aged fifty-nine. His death was a great blow to me. He had been always, if anything, too kind to me. He more than filled the place of my father, whom I never remember seeing. I was very greatly attached to him, and delighted to be with him in the fields, or going to Polegate with him on a load of corn.
The booklet "George Meek's Grandfather" was published in February 2016. The abstract for the book reads:
George MEEK (1868-1921) lived a life of poverty in Eastbourne, East Sussex, yet in 1910 he published the book: “George Meek, Bath Chair-Man, By Himself” with the support of famous author and fellow socialist H.G. Wells.
This booklet is about Benjamin KNIBBS otherwise HUMPHRIES, the grandfather who raised George as a child and is frequently mentioned in the book although not by name. It provides a comprehensive family background for George Meek, integrating it with his writings in the book, much of which has not been published before. A detailed family tree is presented in the appendices along with a transcription of the settlement examination held in 1864 for Benjamin's daughter Rose Hannah which reveals much of the family history.
A copy is available for download at www.archive.org.

Family 1

Elizabeth Bull b. 28 Dec 1816, d. 18 Apr 1849
Marriage*
Benjamin Humphries married Elizabeth Bull, daughter of Thomas Bull and Martha Bandy, on 1 June 1841 at Tingewick, Buckinghamshire, England.2 
Children

Family 2

Elizabeth Moore b. 17 Mar 1816, d. Mar 1890
Marriage*
Benjamin Humphries married Elizabeth Moore, daughter of Thomas Moore and Martha (?), in 1852 at Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, England, surname HUMPHRY.5 

Citations

  1. [S76] George Meek, "George Meek, Bath Chair-Man, By Himself", Constable & Co. Ltd., First Edition (1910).
  2. [S49] Marriage certificate of Benjamin Humphreys and Elizabeth Bull, married 1 Jun 1841 in the Registration District of Buckingham, Buckinghamshire, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 6 Page 523).
  3. [S67] 1841 Census for England "Class: HO107; Piece: 44; Book: 29; Civil Parish: Tingewick; County: Buckinghamshire; Enumeration District: 1; Folio: 15; Page: 25; Line: 14; GSU roll: 241212."
  4. [S200] Birth certificate of Ann Elizabeth Humphrys, born 10 Jul 1843, registered 20 Jul 1843 in the Registration District of Brackley, Northamptonshire, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 15 Page 198).
  5. [S143] General Register Office: Indexes to Marriages, Sep 1837 - 2006, "Jan-Mar 1852, Aylesbury, Vol 3a Page 449."
  6. [S521] Rosalind Hodge, "Jevington, Wannock and Willingdon: A Portrait in Old Postcards and Photographs", S B Publications, First Edition (2003).
  7. [S526] Settlement Examination & Removal Order for Rose Hannah Humphries and her illegitimate son Benjamin Henry (8 months) from Eastbourne to Finmere, 9 Aug 1864. (ESRO:DE/B 26/71).
  8. [S59] Marriage certificate of William Godden and Ann Elizabeth Humphries, married 5 Mar 1865 in the Registration District of Eastbourne, Sussex, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 2b Page 77).
  9. [S143] General Register Office: Indexes to Marriages, Sep 1837 - 2006, "Jan-Mar 1868, Eastbourne RD, Vol 2b Page 79."
  10. [S143] General Register Office: Indexes to Marriages, Sep 1837 - 2006, "Oct-Dec 1869, Eastbourne RD, Vol 2b Page 109."
  11. [S86] Death certificate of Ann Elizabeth Godding, died 6 Oct 1872, registered 8 Oct 1872 in the Registration District of Eastbourne, Sussex, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 2b Page 39).
  12. [S82] Death certificate of Benjamin Humphress, died 4 Oct 1878, registered 7 Oct 1878 in the Registration District of Eastbourne, Sussex, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 2b Page 41).
  13. [S25] Index to Burials, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project, "age 59 years."

Ethel Louisa Taylor

b. 1885, d. 22 October 1950
FatherMoses Taylor b. 15 Apr 1846, d. 18 Apr 1928
MotherHarriet Terry b. 15 Sep 1850, d. 2 Mar 1918
     Ethel Louisa Taylor was born in 1885 at Brighton, Sussex, England.1 She was the daughter of Moses Taylor and Harriet Terry.
In 1891 Ethel Louisa Taylor lived at 29 St Martins Place, Brighton, Sussex, England.
In 1901 Ethel Louisa Taylor lived at 29 St Martins Place, Brighton, Sussex, England.
Note that an Edwin Harris was a boarder with Ethel's parents, Moses and Harriet Taylor for the 1911 census.2
Ethel Louisa Taylor married David Harris before 1918. Extensive searching has been unable to find this marriage to David Harris and he was only identified from Ethel's probate record.
As of before 1918, her married name was Harris.
Ethel Louisa Taylor witnessed the death of Harriet Terry on 2 March 1918 at 56 Gladstone Place, Brighton, Sussex, England; She died of acute bronchitis.3
Ethel's husband was a sergeant major. After Harriet died in 1918 they moved in with Moses at 56 Gladstone Place. George Taylor taught her husband to drive, and he later set up a removal business which is still running. Their sons or grandsons must be running it now (information from Minnie Topping).4
Ethel Louisa Taylor witnessed the death of Moses Taylor on 18 April 1928 at 56 Gladstone Place, Brighton, Sussex, England; died of myocardial degeneration, chronic bronchitis and hypostatic pneumonia.5
Ethel Louisa Taylor witnessed the probate of the estate of Winifred Eva Taylor on 7 August 1948 at Lewes, Sussex, England; Effects: £1199 15s 7d. Probate to Ethel Louisa Harris (wife of David Harris).6
Ethel Louisa Taylor died on 22 October 1950 at Brighton, Sussex, England.7
A gravestone inscriptionfor Ethel Louisa Taylor was recorded as
Ethel Louisa Harris, died 22nd October 1950 aged 65 years. Raymond, grandson of the above, died 15th June 19??4
Her estate was probated on 21 March 1951 at Lewes, Sussex, England, of 56 Gladstone Place, Brighton. Effects 1,739 pounds 5s 3d. Probate to David Harris and George Edwin Harris, removal contractors.8
Possible deaths for the grandson Raymond are:
1941 at Worthing: Jul-Sep 1941, Worthing, Vol 2b Page 760, age 1 year
1945 at Brighton: Apr-Jun 1945, Brighton, Vol 2b Page 259, age 2 years.

Family

David Harris b. c 1880
Marriage*
Ethel Louisa Taylor married David Harris before 1918. Extensive searching has been unable to find this marriage to David Harris and he was only identified from Ethel's probate record. 
Children

Citations

  1. [S142] General Register Office: Indexes to Births, Sep 1837-2006, "Oct-Dec 1885, Brighton, Vol 2b Page 232."
  2. [S73] 1911 Census for England "RG14PN5170 RG78PN228 RD80 SD1 ED18 SN150."
  3. [S18] Death certificate of Harriet Taylor, died 2 Mar 1918, registered 2 Mar 1918 in the Registration District of Brighton, Sussex, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 2b Page 342).
  4. [S12] Information supplied by Florence Minnie Topping (52 West Way, Hangleton, Hove, Sussex, England) to Geoffrey Barber (Subiaco, WA, Australia), September 1988.
  5. [S21] Death certificate of Moses Taylor, died 18 Apr 1928, registered 18 Apr 1928 in the Registration District of Brighton, Sussex, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 2b Page 351).
  6. [S422] National Probate Calendar, England & Wales (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1995. (https://www.ancestry.co.uk/).
  7. [S141] General Register Office: Indexes to Deaths, Sep 1837 - 2006, "Oct-Dec 1950, Brighton, Vol 5h Page 48, age 65 years."
  8. [S244] Website "Ancestry" (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/) "Ancestry.com. England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010.
    Original data: Principal Probate Registry. Calendar of the Grants of Probate and Letters of Administration made in the Probate Registries of the High Court of Justice in England. London, England © Crown copyright."

Florence Elsie McKay

b. 8 September 1926, d. 13 September 2015
FatherLeonard George McKay b. 30 May 1904, d. 31 Oct 1967
MotherElsie Ellen Hoare b. 15 Jun 1905, d. 3 Mar 1992
Florence Elsie Brown
     Florence Elsie McKay was born on 8 September 1926 at Midland, Western Australia, Australia. She was the daughter of Leonard George McKay and Elsie Ellen Hoare.
Florence Elsie McKay married Mervyn John Brown, son of Hugh Philip Brown and Eveline Amelia Clegg, on 8 October 1949 at North Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
As of 8 October 1949, her married name was Brown.
Circa 1950 Florence Elsie McKay and Mervyn John Brown lived at 14 Robin St, Mt Lawley, Western Australia, Australia.
Florence Elsie McKay died on 13 September 2015 at 473 Blue Plains Road, Chittering, Western Australia, Australia, at age 89.
Cause of death was cerebrovascular event (1 day), hypertension (8 years), atrial fibrillation (4 years).
Funeral Director was Purslowe Tinetti Funerals, 264 Fitzgerald St, Northam, WA (Dianne Joan Tinetti.)
Her body was cremated on 23 September 2015 at Karrakatta Cemetery, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

Family

Mervyn John Brown b. 31 Jan 1921, d. 8 Jun 1988
Marriage*
Florence Elsie McKay married Mervyn John Brown, son of Hugh Philip Brown and Eveline Amelia Clegg, on 8 October 1949 at North Perth, Western Australia, Australia

Mervyn John Brown

b. 31 January 1921, d. 8 June 1988
FatherHugh Philip Brown b. 10 Jan 1891, d. 31 May 1970
MotherEveline Amelia Clegg b. 10 Sep 1888, d. 23 Apr 1979
Mervyn John Brown, RAAF Flight Sergeant 1940s.
     Mervyn John Brown was born on 31 January 1921 at Subiaco, Western Australia, Australia. He was the son of Hugh Philip Brown and Eveline Amelia Clegg.
Mervyn John Brown married Florence Elsie McKay, daughter of Leonard George McKay and Elsie Ellen Hoare, on 8 October 1949 at North Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
Circa 1950 Mervyn John Brown and Florence Elsie McKay lived at 14 Robin St, Mt Lawley, Western Australia, Australia.
Mervyn John Brown was a compositor (at the West Australian newspaper) on 6 November 1957.
Mervyn John Brown retired in December 1975. As Technical Manager of the Sunday Independent newspaper (previously the Independent newspaper.)
Mervyn John Brown died on 8 June 1988 at Gifford Road, Dunsborough, Western Australia, Australia, at age 67.
His body was cremated on 9 June 1988 at Bunbury Cemetery, Bunbury, Western Australia, Australia.

Family

Florence Elsie McKay b. 8 Sep 1926, d. 13 Sep 2015
Marriage*
Mervyn John Brown married Florence Elsie McKay, daughter of Leonard George McKay and Elsie Ellen Hoare, on 8 October 1949 at North Perth, Western Australia, Australia

Elsie Ellen Hoare

b. 15 June 1905, d. 3 March 1992
FatherGeorge Fortescue Hoare b. 22 Jun 1870, d. 4 Nov 1943
MotherEllen Gregg b. 27 Feb 1882, d. 5 May 1957
Len and Elsie McKay at a wedding, 9 October 1949.
     Elsie Ellen Hoare was born on 15 June 1905 at Midland, Western Australia, Australia. She was the daughter of George Fortescue Hoare and Ellen Gregg.
Elsie Ellen Hoare married Leonard George McKay, son of George McKay and Florence Amelia Ward, on 12 December 1925 at Guildford, Western Australia, Australia.
As of 12 December 1925, her married name was McKay.
Elsie Ellen Hoare died on 3 March 1992 at Dunsborough, Western Australia, Australia, at age 86.1
Her body was cremated after 3 March 1992 at Karrakatta Cemetery, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.1

Family

Leonard George McKay b. 30 May 1904, d. 31 Oct 1967
Marriage*
Elsie Ellen Hoare married Leonard George McKay, son of George McKay and Florence Amelia Ward, on 12 December 1925 at Guildford, Western Australia, Australia
Children

Citations

  1. [S418] Website "Metropolitan Cemeteries Board, WA" (http://www.mcb.wa.gov.au/).

Leonard George McKay

b. 30 May 1904, d. 31 October 1967
FatherGeorge McKay b. 16 Sep 1872, d. 28 Sep 1953
MotherFlorence Amelia Ward b. 9 Jan 1869, d. 14 May 1909
Len and Elsie McKay at a wedding, 9 October 1949.
     Leonard George McKay was born on 30 May 1904 at West Perth, Western Australia, Australia.1 He was the son of George McKay and Florence Amelia Ward.
Leonard attended Scotch College in Perth.
Leonard George McKay married Elsie Ellen Hoare, daughter of George Fortescue Hoare and Ellen Gregg, on 12 December 1925 at Guildford, Western Australia, Australia.
Leonard George McKay died on 31 October 1967 at Fremantle, Western Australia, Australia, at age 63.2,3
His body was cremated after 31 October 1967 at Karrakatta Cemetery, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

Family

Elsie Ellen Hoare b. 15 Jun 1905, d. 3 Mar 1992
Marriage*
Leonard George McKay married Elsie Ellen Hoare, daughter of George Fortescue Hoare and Ellen Gregg, on 12 December 1925 at Guildford, Western Australia, Australia
Children

Citations

  1. [S301] Index to Births, Deaths & Marriages, http://www.bdm.dotag.wa.gov.au, 1841-1971, compiled by Deaths & Marriages, WA Registry of Births, Level 10, 141 St Georges Terrace, Perth WA 6000 "Registration No 5072 in Year 1904."
  2. [S301] Index to Births, Deaths & Marriages, http://www.bdm.dotag.wa.gov.au, 1841-1971, compiled by Deaths & Marriages, WA Registry of Births, Level 10, 141 St Georges Terrace, Perth WA 6000 "Registration No 617 in Year 1967."
  3. [S418] Website "Metropolitan Cemeteries Board, WA" (http://www.mcb.wa.gov.au/).

Leonard Fortescue McKay

b. 4 June 1928, d. 9 December 2003
FatherLeonard George McKay b. 30 May 1904, d. 31 Oct 1967
MotherElsie Ellen Hoare b. 15 Jun 1905, d. 3 Mar 1992
     Leonard Fortescue McKay was born on 4 June 1928 at Inglewood, Western Australia, Australia. He was the son of Leonard George McKay and Elsie Ellen Hoare.
Leonard Fortescue McKay married Margaret J Challinor in 1954.
Leonard Fortescue McKay died on 9 December 2003 at Yokine, Western Australia, Australia, at age 75.1
His body was cremated after 9 December 2003 at Karrakatta Cemetery, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.1

Family

Margaret J Challinor b. 16 Jan 1931, d. Dec 2019
Marriage*
Leonard Fortescue McKay married Margaret J Challinor in 1954. 

Citations

  1. [S418] Website "Metropolitan Cemeteries Board, WA" (http://www.mcb.wa.gov.au/).

Hugh Philip Brown

b. 10 January 1891, d. 31 May 1970
FatherHugh Brown b. 11 Jan 1857, d. 15 Jul 1931
MotherFrances Margaret Ward b. c 1863, d. 7 Sep 1934
Hugh Philip Brown c1918
     Hugh Philip Brown was born on 10 January 1891 at Toronto, New South Wales, Australia; (near Wallsend).1
Original birth certificate has Hugh Toronto Brown. Altered 18 June 1958
to Hugh Phillip Brown as this is the name by which he had always known himself. He was the son of Hugh Brown and Frances Margaret Ward.
Hugh Philip Brown married Eveline Amelia Clegg, daughter of Jacob Clegg and Margaret Bartlett, on 1 October 1910 at Baptist Church, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
Hugh Philip Brown's wife Eva reported that c1913 (when child Hugh was a baby) that there were family meetings concerning the Ward family. Hugh Philip Brown would go off to see his family and tell her "it was none of her business". This was possibly concerning Hugh's mother's sister, Jane Mary Skelton (nee Ward) whose husband mysteriously left her on 2 September 1914 and disappeared. He withdrew all his money from their bank accounts but mailed her a bank book with 150 pounds deposited for her. She received no further communication from him and the courts finally pronounced him dead in 1927. The family meetings may have been about helping Jane, either financially or in some other way. Interestingly, Jane died in Toronto, NSW in 1947 which was Hugh Philip Brown's birthplace in 1891.
At one time Hugh and Eva lived at Swan St, Tuart Hill. They eventually sold this for 190 pounds.
In 1954 Hugh Philip Brown and Eveline Amelia Clegg lived at Dunsborough, Western Australia, Australia. They retired to their holiday house at the beach.2
Circa 1963 Hugh Philip Brown and Eveline Amelia Clegg lived at Mt Lawley, Western Australia, Australia. They moved into the Air Force Association homes on Alexander Drive.
Hugh Philip Brown died on 31 May 1970 at Hollywood, Western Australia, Australia, at age 79.
His body was cremated after 31 May 1970 at Karrakatta Cemetery, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

Family

Eveline Amelia Clegg b. 10 Sep 1888, d. 23 Apr 1979
Marriage*
Hugh Philip Brown married Eveline Amelia Clegg, daughter of Jacob Clegg and Margaret Bartlett, on 1 October 1910 at Baptist Church, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Children

Citations

  1. [S287] Birth certificate of Hugh Toronto Brown, born 10 Jan 1891, registered 19 Feb 1891 in the Registration District of Wallsend, NSW (Reference no: 464).
  2. [S305] Webpage The West Australian (http://trove.nla.gov.au/) "1954 'Family Notices.', The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954), 2 December, p. 32, viewed 21 July, 2012, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article52967518."

Eveline Amelia Clegg

b. 10 September 1888, d. 23 April 1979
FatherJacob Clegg b. 19 Aug 1858, d. 8 Oct 1895
MotherMargaret Bartlett b. 29 Jul 1863, d. 2 Jun 1928
Eveline Brown (nee Clegg) 8 Oct 1949 at son Mervyn's wedding.
     Eveline Amelia Clegg was born on 10 September 1888 at Wandin, Victoria, Australia. She was the daughter of Jacob Clegg and Margaret Bartlett.
Eveline Amelia Clegg was also known as Eva.
Eveline Amelia Clegg married Hugh Philip Brown, son of Hugh Brown and Frances Margaret Ward, on 1 October 1910 at Baptist Church, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
As of 1 October 1910, her married name was Brown.
Hugh Philip Brown's wife Eva reported that c1913 (when child Hugh was a baby) that there were family meetings concerning the Ward family. Hugh Philip Brown would go off to see his family and tell her "it was none of her business". This was possibly concerning Hugh's mother's sister, Jane Mary Skelton (nee Ward) whose husband mysteriously left her on 2 September 1914 and disappeared. He withdrew all his money from their bank accounts but mailed her a bank book with 150 pounds deposited for her. She received no further communication from him and the courts finally pronounced him dead in 1927. The family meetings may have been about helping Jane, either financially or in some other way. Interestingly, Jane died in Toronto, NSW in 1947 which was Hugh Philip Brown's birthplace in 1891.
A notice in The West Australian Nestpaper on 30 Sep 1926 mentions Eva:
CLEGG.-On September 21, at the Grosvenor Hospital, Beaconsfield, Lillian Ann, dearly beloved eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. Barber, of 92 East-street, East Fre-mantle, and loving sister of Eva, Mrs. H. P. Brown, Wally, Percy, Frank, Charlie, Wilfred, Stanley, and Leslie, aged 44 years. Peace, perfect peace.1
Eva was friendly with her brother Stan's wife, Elvy, and would visit and stay with the family in NSW every year.
In 1954 Eveline Amelia Clegg and Hugh Philip Brown lived at Dunsborough, Western Australia, Australia. They retired to their holiday house at the beach.2
Circa 1963 Eveline Amelia Clegg and Hugh Philip Brown lived at Mt Lawley, Western Australia, Australia. They moved into the Air Force Association homes on Alexander Drive.
Eveline Amelia Clegg died on 23 April 1979 at Victoria Park, Western Australia, Australia, at age 90.
Her body was cremated after 23 April 1979 at Karrakatta Cemetery, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

Family

Hugh Philip Brown b. 10 Jan 1891, d. 31 May 1970
Marriage*
Eveline Amelia Clegg married Hugh Philip Brown, son of Hugh Brown and Frances Margaret Ward, on 1 October 1910 at Baptist Church, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Children

Citations

  1. [S305] Webpage The West Australian (http://trove.nla.gov.au/) "1926 'Family Notices.', Western Mail (Perth, WA : 1885 - 1954), 30 September, p. 2, viewed 21 July, 2012, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38026871."
  2. [S305] Webpage The West Australian (http://trove.nla.gov.au/) "1954 'Family Notices.', The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954), 2 December, p. 32, viewed 21 July, 2012, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article52967518."

Hugh Walter Edward Brown

b. 24 April 1913, d. 14 October 1978
FatherHugh Philip Brown b. 10 Jan 1891, d. 31 May 1970
MotherEveline Amelia Clegg b. 10 Sep 1888, d. 23 Apr 1979
Hugh Walter Edward Brown
     Hugh Walter Edward Brown was born on 24 April 1913 at Fremantle, Western Australia, Australia. He was the son of Hugh Philip Brown and Eveline Amelia Clegg.
Hugh Walter Edward Brown married Sheila Margaret Stuart Mackenzie, daughter of Montrose Oscar Stuart Mackenzie and Ellen Louisa Kenward, on 17 December 1938.
Hugh Walter Edward Brown married Trudie Hartmann circa 1977.
Hugh Walter Edward Brown died on 14 October 1978 at Wembley, Western Australia, Australia, at age 65.
Hugh Walter Edward Brown was buried after 14 October 1978 at Karrakatta Cemetery, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

Family 1

Sheila Margaret Stuart Mackenzie b. 25 Dec 1914, d. 23 Jan 1976
Marriage*
Hugh Walter Edward Brown married Sheila Margaret Stuart Mackenzie, daughter of Montrose Oscar Stuart Mackenzie and Ellen Louisa Kenward, on 17 December 1938. 

Family 2

Trudie Hartmann b. c 1925
Marriage*
Hugh Walter Edward Brown married Trudie Hartmann circa 1977. 

Ruth Dunk

b. 27 July 1807, d. 6 November 1873
FatherJoseph Dunk b. 4 Jul 1762, d. 23 Aug 1848
MotherJane Marchant b. 9 Jul 1769, d. 28 Apr 1848
     Ruth Dunk was born on 27 July 1807 at Westham, Sussex, England.1 She was the daughter of Joseph Dunk and Jane Marchant.
Ruth Dunk was baptized on 13 September 1807 at St Mary, Westham, Sussex, England.1
Ruth Dunk married Michael Godden, son of Michael Godden and Lucy Verrall, on 25 September 1830 at Eastbourne, Sussex, England, both of Eastbourne.
As of 25 September 1830, her married name was Godden.
Between 1831 and 1835 Ruth Dunk and Michael Godden lived at Meads, Eastbourne, Sussex, England, as recorded on John, Emma and Lucy's baptisms.
On 7 June 1841 Ruth Dunk and Michael Godden lived at Meads, Eastbourne, Sussex, England.2
On 30 March 1851 Ruth Dunk and Michael Godden lived at Baileys Cottage, Eastbourne, Sussex, England.3
On 7 April 1861 Ruth Dunk and Michael Godden lived at Mill Lane Cottage, Eastbourne, Sussex, England.
In the 1861 census, Michael and Ruth Godden have three grandchildren living with them - Alfred Godden (8 years), George Godden (4 years), and John Godden (1 year) all born in Eastbourne. Alfred is the illegitimate son of daughter Emma Godden. George was baptised 29 Mar 1857 the son of Michael and Sophy Godden (abode South St, labourer) and John William Godden was baptised 10 Jul 1859 son of Sophia Godden (no father given, abode Southbourne). George and John are still living with Michael and Ruth in the 1871 census along with grandchildren Katie Elizabeth Godden (8 years) and Robert Godden (6 years). Katie is the illegitimate daughter of Elizabeth Godden. Robert is likely Frederick Robert Godden baptised 22 Oct 1865 daughter of Elizabeth Godden (single woman). It seems that Michael and Ruth played a major role in raising the illegitimate children of their daughters!4,5
On 2 April 1871 Ruth Dunk and Michael Godden lived at Ballis (Bailey's?) cottage, Willingdon, Sussex, England, next to the Crumble Bridge gatehouse and near the Lodge Inn. Today the area is called Tollgate Gardens, named in the 1960s after the tollgate that stood by the bridge over the Crumbles sewer on the road to Pevensey. Beyond this point the road was administered by the Horsebridge and Horeham Turnpike Trust.
Ruth Dunk died on 6 November 1873 at Union Workhouse, Eastbourne, Sussex, England, at age 66. She died of sloughing legs.6
An article in the St Leonard Observer 8 Nov 1873 reports that Michael Godden left his wife Ruth at the Union as she was so ill and he could not look after her. The case was dismissed and Ruth died within days.7
Ruth Dunk was buried on 11 November 1873 at St Mary, Eastbourne, Sussex, England. The burial record noted that she was 64 years old and from the Eastbourne Union Workhouse.8

Family

Michael Godden b. 10 Feb 1811, d. 11 May 1901
Marriage*
Ruth Dunk married Michael Godden, son of Michael Godden and Lucy Verrall, on 25 September 1830 at Eastbourne, Sussex, England, both of Eastbourne. 
Children

Citations

  1. [S23] Index to Baptisms, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project,.
  2. [S67] 1841 Census for England "HO107 piece 1114 folio 13/35 page 15."
  3. [S16] 1851 Census for England "HO107 piece 1637 folio 164 page 39."
  4. [S69] 1871 Census for England, "RG10 piece 1038 folio 51 page 6."
  5. [S68] 1861 Census for England, "RG09 piece 567 folio 81 page 11."
  6. [S365] Death certificate of Ruth Godden, died 6 Nov 1873, registered 8 Nov 1873 in the Registration District of Eastbourne, Sussex, England (GRO Index Ref: Vol 2b Page 38).
  7. [S599] Webpage St Leonard Observer "8 Nov 1873."
  8. [S25] Index to Burials, 1538 onwards, compiled by Sussex Family History Group, http://www.sfhg.org.uk/, ongoing project, "age 64 years, Union House."

George McKay

b. 16 September 1872, d. 28 September 1953
FatherDuncan McKay b. c 1827, d. 28 Feb 1913
MotherAnn Hall b. 28 May 1837, d. 10 Aug 1915
     George McKay was born on 16 September 1872 at Broadford, Victoria, Australia. He was the son of Duncan McKay and Ann Hall.
George was in Form IV at Brunswick College (Victoria) in 1888 and was awarded a book as a prize in mathematics. The principal was Robert McKay, MA (not known if he was a relation).
He was educated at Scots College Melbourne as a boarder. His family was living in Kilmor, Victoria.
George McKay was a bank clerk in 1901.
In 1901 George McKay lived at 50 Francis St, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
George McKay married Florence Amelia Ward, daughter of Thomas Ward and Jane Little, on 5 February 1901 at The Presbyterian Church, Havelock St, West Perth, Western Australia, Australia. Witnesses: Norman Sinclair Ward and Clara L Ward.1
It is not known how George and Florence came to be in Western Australia given that their origins were in Victoria. The gold boom may have brought George to Western Australia in banking. George McKay and the WARD family were at Coolgardie and Kalgoorlie and the goldfields at the turn of the century.
George and Florence were foundation members of the Christian Science Church in Western Australia. The first Sunday service was held on 9.2.1908 in a small dressmaker's room in Hay St. Rose OCKLEY (who George married after Florence died) was also in this group. George become a second reader, first reader and finally a trustee of the Church. He bid for, and bought the block of land in St George's Place (near the Barrack's Arch) where the Church was built in 1939.
George McKAY worked for the English Scottish & Australian (ES&A) Bank in St Georges Terrace, Perth all his life. It is reported that he became a Bank Manager. He had a small Austin 10 car. He was a very tall (6 ft 3"), thin man, rather gaunt and angular.
He owned a big parcel of land to the left of Canning Highway just after Canning Bridge (Mt Pleasant area) and some other land in Greenmount "on the right as you go up". He also owned the vineyard in Bibra Lake where his son Len and wife Elsie first lived. Some of his money helped Len set up the finance company "Westral Cash Orders.
When Florence & Valmai died George and Leonard went to the Eastern States to see his family and then toured around New Zealand. They often went to the Eastern States to see the family. His father died 28.2.1913 and his uncle John died on 6.2.1913, both in Kilmore, Victoria. So four of his close family died in four years. There was apparently some argument with his brothers over his father's property in Kilmore. His mother died on 10.8.1915 in Brunswick, Melbourne, Victoria.
His son Leonard's family would travel to Church every Sunday by car from Guildford into Perth and then go to Alvan St, Mt Lawley to see George and his second wife Rose ("the mater"). George and Rose went East by train every year to Christian Science "Association" (a meeting of all those who had taken instruction from a particular CS teacher). On these occasions the church would book several carriages of the train.
George McKay married Rose Clorice Ockley in 1910 at Perth, Western Australia, Australia.2
The marriage entry gives Rose's surname as Lodge. Was this a second marriage for her?
Other marriages for George MACKAY were to Rose Clorice OCKLEY (1910) and Mrs Elizabeth KANE (sometime after Rose died in 1942 but before 1949). Rose was said to be the daughter of a Melbourne doctor and born in Victoria. She was called "the mater" by Leonard and family. There was possibly a fourth marriage when he was old.
George McKay married Elizabeth Kane after 1942 at Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
When he was very old he lived with his son Len and his wife Elsie. He would spend his days in Hyde Park which was across the road. He became rather senile towards the end. He spent a short time in St David's Hospital, Mt Lawley and was sent from here to Heathcote Hospital for the insane. He died there a few weeks after admission. The story was told by Elsie Ellen McKay of George towards the end in the hospital for the insane, saying "Ladee (which he often called Len, his son) there is plenty of money left somewhere, I can't remember how to get it." He died leaving very little.
George McKay died on 28 September 1953 at Perth, Western Australia, Australia, at age 81.3,4
His body was cremated. Ashes were placed in the family grave after 28 September 1953 at Grave BA 69 (Presbyterian), Karrakatta Cemetery, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.4

Family 1

Florence Amelia Ward b. 9 Jan 1869, d. 14 May 1909
Marriage*
George McKay married Florence Amelia Ward, daughter of Thomas Ward and Jane Little, on 5 February 1901 at The Presbyterian Church, Havelock St, West Perth, Western Australia, Australia. Witnesses: Norman Sinclair Ward and Clara L Ward.1 
Children

Family 2

Rose Clorice Ockley b. c 1874, d. 11 Aug 1942
Marriage*
George McKay married Rose Clorice Ockley in 1910 at Perth, Western Australia, Australia.2 

Family 3

Elizabeth Kane
Marriage*
George McKay married Elizabeth Kane after 1942 at Perth, Western Australia, Australia

Citations

  1. [S301] Index to Births, Deaths & Marriages, http://www.bdm.dotag.wa.gov.au, 1841-1971, compiled by Deaths & Marriages, WA Registry of Births, Level 10, 141 St Georges Terrace, Perth WA 6000 "Registration No 1116 in Year 1901."
  2. [S301] Index to Births, Deaths & Marriages, http://www.bdm.dotag.wa.gov.au, 1841-1971, compiled by Deaths & Marriages, WA Registry of Births, Level 10, 141 St Georges Terrace, Perth WA 6000 "Registration No 526 in Year 1910."
  3. [S301] Index to Births, Deaths & Marriages, http://www.bdm.dotag.wa.gov.au, 1841-1971, compiled by Deaths & Marriages, WA Registry of Births, Level 10, 141 St Georges Terrace, Perth WA 6000 "Registration No 2296 in Year 1953."
  4. [S418] Website "Metropolitan Cemeteries Board, WA" (http://www.mcb.wa.gov.au/).

Florence Amelia Ward

b. 9 January 1869, d. 14 May 1909
FatherThomas Ward b. 6 Apr 1831, d. 25 Dec 1881
MotherJane Little b. 26 Aug 1831, d. 21 Nov 1893
     Florence Amelia Ward was born on 9 January 1869 at High St, St Kilda, Victoria, Australia. She was the daughter of Thomas Ward and Jane Little.
Florence is said to have come from a Quaker family. She was good at sewing and crafts. She did tatting, bobbin lace, drawn threadwork, tapestry and richelieu work amongst other things. She played the piano and there exists sheet music with her name on them. Julitha has her Victorian jewellery box and several items of jewellery. She was well educated. A book, Alfred Lord Tennyson's complete works, is inscribed with her name and dated 1896. It contains the course outline for a Melbourne University Extension School programme on Tennyson which she must have attended.
In 1901 Florence Amelia Ward lived at 609 Murray Street, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
Florence Amelia Ward married George McKay, son of Duncan McKay and Ann Hall, on 5 February 1901 at The Presbyterian Church, Havelock St, West Perth, Western Australia, Australia. Witnesses: Norman Sinclair Ward and Clara L Ward.1
Both of Florence Ward's parents were deceased when she was married.
As of 5 February 1901, her married name was McKay.
It is not known how George and Florence came to be in Western Australia given that their origins were in Victoria. The gold boom may have brought George to Western Australia in banking. George McKay and the WARD family were at Coolgardie and Kalgoorlie and the goldfields at the turn of the century.
George and Florence were foundation members of the Christian Science Church in Western Australia. The first Sunday service was held on 9.2.1908 in a small dressmaker's room in Hay St. Rose OCKLEY (who George married after Florence died) was also in this group. George become a second reader, first reader and finally a trustee of the Church. He bid for, and bought the block of land in St George's Place (near the Barrack's Arch) where the Church was built in 1939.
Florence Amelia Ward died on 14 May 1909 at Perth, Western Australia, Australia, at age 40.2,3
Florence died of TB although the family was told it was the flu because of the stigma associated with TB (consumption). Daughter Valmai died one month later and was buried in the same grave as her mother.
George McKay purchased burial plots BA 69,70 for himself and Florence. The cost was 3 pounds 3 shillings. He was living at 39 Outrim St, Perth at the time.
The following death notice appeared in the Western Mail on the 22 May 1909:
McKay - On the 14th inst., at 39 Outram-street, Florence Amelia, dearly beloved wife of Geo.McKay, and sister of N. S. Ward, Park-road, Mount Lawley.4
Florence Amelia Ward was buried after 22 May 1909 at Grave BA 70 (Presbyterian), Karrakatta Cemetery, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.3

Family

George McKay b. 16 Sep 1872, d. 28 Sep 1953
Marriage*
Florence Amelia Ward married George McKay, son of Duncan McKay and Ann Hall, on 5 February 1901 at The Presbyterian Church, Havelock St, West Perth, Western Australia, Australia. Witnesses: Norman Sinclair Ward and Clara L Ward.1 
Children

Citations

  1. [S301] Index to Births, Deaths & Marriages, http://www.bdm.dotag.wa.gov.au, 1841-1971, compiled by Deaths & Marriages, WA Registry of Births, Level 10, 141 St Georges Terrace, Perth WA 6000 "Registration No 1116 in Year 1901."
  2. [S301] Index to Births, Deaths & Marriages, http://www.bdm.dotag.wa.gov.au, 1841-1971, compiled by Deaths & Marriages, WA Registry of Births, Level 10, 141 St Georges Terrace, Perth WA 6000 "Registration No 296 in Year 1909."
  3. [S418] Website "Metropolitan Cemeteries Board, WA" (http://www.mcb.wa.gov.au/).
  4. [S327] Webpage Western Mail (http://trove.nla.gov.au/) "1909 'Family Notices.', Western Mail (Perth, WA : 1885 - 1954), 22 May, p. 31, viewed 14 March, 2013, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37579526."

Valmai Florence McKay

b. 15 June 1907, d. 4 July 1909
FatherGeorge McKay b. 16 Sep 1872, d. 28 Sep 1953
MotherFlorence Amelia Ward b. 9 Jan 1869, d. 14 May 1909
     Valmai Florence McKay was born on 15 June 1907 at Perth, Western Australia, Australia.1 She was the daughter of George McKay and Florence Amelia Ward.
A christening mug made of ruby glass exists which is inscribed in gold "Valmai 1908."
A financial account for Valmai's funeral survives and includes an advertisement of the funeral and a death notice in the newspaper. She was buried in the same grave as her mother. Her funeral included the use of a mourning coach with a pair of horses and driver.
Valmai Florence McKay died on 4 July 1909 at Perth, Western Australia, Australia, at age 2.2,3
Valmai Florence McKay was buried after 4 July 1909 at Grave BA 70 (Presbyterian), Karrakatta Cemetery, Perth, Western Australia, Australia, with her mother.3

Citations

  1. [S301] Index to Births, Deaths & Marriages, http://www.bdm.dotag.wa.gov.au, 1841-1971, compiled by Deaths & Marriages, WA Registry of Births, Level 10, 141 St Georges Terrace, Perth WA 6000 "Registration No 825 in Year 1907."
  2. [S301] Index to Births, Deaths & Marriages, http://www.bdm.dotag.wa.gov.au, 1841-1971, compiled by Deaths & Marriages, WA Registry of Births, Level 10, 141 St Georges Terrace, Perth WA 6000 "Registration No 405 in Year 1909."
  3. [S418] Website "Metropolitan Cemeteries Board, WA" (http://www.mcb.wa.gov.au/).

Duncan McKay

b. circa 1827, d. 28 February 1913
FatherWilliam McKay
MotherIsabella McLaren
     Duncan McKay was born circa 1827 at Kincardine, Rosshire, Scotland. He was the son of William McKay and Isabella McLaren.
Duncan McKAY and his brother John arrived at Port Phillip Bay, Victoria, Australia on 13.9.1853 on the ship "Hurricane" which departed Glasgow, Scotland on 8.6.1853. Duncan was aged 26 years, a farmer and John aged 24 years, a farm labourer. They settled in Kilmore. John died on 6.2.1913 in Powlett St, Kilmore, Victoria.
In 1860 Duncan McKay lived at Broadford, Victoria, Australia.
Duncan McKay married Ann Hall, daughter of Angus Hall and Margaret McKenzie, on 16 May 1860 at Campbellfield, Victoria, Australia, according to the rights of the Presbyterian Church. Ann married at age 22 years according to marriage certificate and at age 18 years according to her death certificate.
A letter from their daughter Jessie states that Duncan and Annie used to fight a lot. Apparently Anne was very strict.
Duncan's death certificate (1913) states his occupation as "of independent means". They owned property in Kilmore. He died of heart failure.
Len McKay (son of Leonard McKay & Elsie Hoare) has a bible written in Gaelic. Inside is written "Duncan MacKay 2nd March 1846 Kilmacalmaig" which is in the area of Kilmore in Scotland. The area where they settled in Victoria is also called Kilmore. Is there a link?
Annie, Jean and Jack (John) all lived together in St Kilda in Melbourne. They never married. They went to South Africa at one time and had a restaurant there. They also later ran a restaurant in Perth, Western Australia and then went back to Melbourne. George was the only one to permanently settle in Western Australia. Annie, Jean and Jack sent money to Len and Elsie McKay for music lessons for their daughter Florence.
Daughter Margaret was known as "Maggie". She and husband John had twin children, Marjorie (blind) and Raymond (died 1969) - information from Wendy Deveson (Sydney).
Son William married Katherine Jackson and had children Ann Isobel (b. 14.4.1892), Hilda Doris (b. 15.5.1894) and Frank (b. 29.7.1896) and William Carlisle (b. 2.8.1898). They all lived in Melbourne, Victoria. The first three children never married. Frank went to WW1. We visited him in 1977/78 when he was living alone in Fermanagh St in Melbourne (Mervyn & Florence Brown (nee McKay) and Julitha and Geoffrey Barber (nee Brown). A copy of his will exists.
William Carlisle (known as Lyle) married Sylvia at 42 years of age. They had one child, Sandra Henrietta. She married and lives in Queensland. All were vegetarians. The three of them came to W.A. on the way to England by ship in the 1950's and had dinner (vegetarian) at 14 Robin St.
Their daughter Jessie (known as Hattie) and husband Harold had children Jack, Leonard and Mabel. Mabel married Henry George Box and they had a daughter Wendy who married a Deveson (later divorced). They had one son.
Duncan McKay died on 28 February 1913 at Powlett St, Kilmore, Victoria, Australia.
Duncan McKay was buried after 28 February 1913 at Old Kilmore Cemetery, Kilmore, Victoria, Australia.

Family

Ann Hall b. 28 May 1837, d. 10 Aug 1915
Marriage*
Duncan McKay married Ann Hall, daughter of Angus Hall and Margaret McKenzie, on 16 May 1860 at Campbellfield, Victoria, Australia, according to the rights of the Presbyterian Church. Ann married at age 22 years according to marriage certificate and at age 18 years according to her death certificate. 
Children

Ann Hall

b. 28 May 1837, d. 10 August 1915
FatherAngus Hall b. c 1808, d. 21 Jan 1869
MotherMargaret McKenzie b. 9 Feb 1817, d. 4 Oct 1898
     Ann Hall was born on 28 May 1837 at Dingwall, Rosshire, Scotland. She was the daughter of Angus Hall and Margaret McKenzie.
Arrived Melbourne onboard 'Athleta' with her parents. Calling, Domestic Servant. Religion, Presbyterian. Education, could read and write. Age at time, 16years. Alive in 1915 when Frank Mackay went overseas to 1st.World War.
In 1860 Ann Hall lived at Wallan Wallan, Victoria, Australia.
Ann Hall was a lady in 1860.
Ann Hall married Duncan McKay, son of William McKay and Isabella McLaren, on 16 May 1860 at Campbellfield, Victoria, Australia, according to the rights of the Presbyterian Church. Ann married at age 22 years according to marriage certificate and at age 18 years according to her death certificate.
As of 16 May 1860, her married name was McKay.
A letter from their daughter Jessie states that Duncan and Annie used to fight a lot. Apparently Anne was very strict.
Duncan's death certificate (1913) states his occupation as "of independent means". They owned property in Kilmore. He died of heart failure.
Len McKay (son of Leonard McKay & Elsie Hoare) has a bible written in Gaelic. Inside is written "Duncan MacKay 2nd March 1846 Kilmacalmaig" which is in the area of Kilmore in Scotland. The area where they settled in Victoria is also called Kilmore. Is there a link?
Annie, Jean and Jack (John) all lived together in St Kilda in Melbourne. They never married. They went to South Africa at one time and had a restaurant there. They also later ran a restaurant in Perth, Western Australia and then went back to Melbourne. George was the only one to permanently settle in Western Australia. Annie, Jean and Jack sent money to Len and Elsie McKay for music lessons for their daughter Florence.
Daughter Margaret was known as "Maggie". She and husband John had twin children, Marjorie (blind) and Raymond (died 1969) - information from Wendy Deveson (Sydney).
Son William married Katherine Jackson and had children Ann Isobel (b. 14.4.1892), Hilda Doris (b. 15.5.1894) and Frank (b. 29.7.1896) and William Carlisle (b. 2.8.1898). They all lived in Melbourne, Victoria. The first three children never married. Frank went to WW1. We visited him in 1977/78 when he was living alone in Fermanagh St in Melbourne (Mervyn & Florence Brown (nee McKay) and Julitha and Geoffrey Barber (nee Brown). A copy of his will exists.
William Carlisle (known as Lyle) married Sylvia at 42 years of age. They had one child, Sandra Henrietta. She married and lives in Queensland. All were vegetarians. The three of them came to W.A. on the way to England by ship in the 1950's and had dinner (vegetarian) at 14 Robin St.
Their daughter Jessie (known as Hattie) and husband Harold had children Jack, Leonard and Mabel. Mabel married Henry George Box and they had a daughter Wendy who married a Deveson (later divorced). They had one son.
Ann Hall died on 10 August 1915 at 80 Blyth St, Brunswick, Victoria, Australia, at age 78.
Ann Hall was buried on 11 August 1915 at Melbourne General Cemetery, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Family

Duncan McKay b. c 1827, d. 28 Feb 1913
Marriage*
Ann Hall married Duncan McKay, son of William McKay and Isabella McLaren, on 16 May 1860 at Campbellfield, Victoria, Australia, according to the rights of the Presbyterian Church. Ann married at age 22 years according to marriage certificate and at age 18 years according to her death certificate. 
Children